Why I Write by Bob Hubbard

Bob Hubbard

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Why I Write
by Bob Hubbard


Why do I write the articles that I write? That is a very good question. Over the years, my comments have led to my being called a racist, a bigot, an anti-Semite, anti-Indian, and more. I've been threatened, and had my family threatened. All because of such serious and world shaking things as an argument on the Internet.

I'm not a fan of sloth, of ignorance by intent or of stupidity by design. I have no time for sacred cows, and in fact I very much agree with author Robert Kriegel that they make the best burgers. I consider myself an iconoclast, or someone who attacks cherished ideas or traditional institutions. Politically I fall into Libertarianism, and consider myself a Jeffersonian favoring a strict limited view of the US Constitution. I'm not a fan of big government, nor the corruption, bloat and inefficiency that follows it. I am not bigoted or racist, but I have nothing but contempt for members of any group, including my own, that fall into stereotypical behaviors, or who think the universe or my wallet somehow owe them anything.

Take the example of the late President Abraham Lincoln. His memory is something on kin with a Saint or deity in the US. You learn in school how he saved the nation, freed the slaves, and reunited the country after a long and bloody war. The reality however is that he freed no one, violated the spirit and letter of the Constitution and probably set back race relations in the nation by at least a hundred years after fighting a long and vengeful illegal war against an independent nation, who left the US legally. This position, supported by numerous documents and well researched books, is not popular, as you can imagine.

Or, take another position. One where you can succeed in this country, if you only work smart and hard enough. I'm told constantly that this isn't possible, that you need to know the right people, have money already, to be connected, and that even then, the deck is stacked against you. My insistence that you can succeed, is met with disdain, despite countless examples of people rising from obscurity to success. People like Col. Harland Sanders, who had little more than a chicken recipe and a lot of perseverance, who went on to found a little known company called Kentucky Fried Chicken, or a guy names Dave Thomas, who worked for KFC, and later launched another little known company called Wendys. I hear garage and basement start ups on shoe strings don't work, but tell that to Apple who was 3 hippies in a garage with an idea that no one wanted and everyone said would fail. Or maybe tell Ashley Qualls that she can't do it. I don't think this 17 yr old will listen to you, being the head of a million dollar business that she started when she was 14 with 8 bucks to do Myspace custom profiles for friends. How about letting Fraser Doherty know he's going to fail. This 19 yr old jam maker is worth around $2 million dollars. Not bad for a business he started at 14. The list goes on, yet I still hear how you just can't win today with the big corporations stacked against you.

Gods help me if I dare to blame black America for causing it's own problems. Far easier to blame some mythological "man" for ones problems. But slavery ended in 1865, 143 years ago from when I'm writing this. In that time, equal rights laws have been passed, schools forcibly desegregated, affirmative action enforced, special grants and scholarships created, as well as reserved enrollment in collages despite academic ability. But should you point out the obvious, that to get ahead one must want to work for it, and that too often it's easier to take the easy route, and you are called a racist, a bigot or worse. But I only echo the words of Dr. William Cosby who said repeatedly that Black America's to blame for Black America's problems. He was of course, soundly booed when he did this in 2004. Or have you heard about Samuel B. Fuller? He started a company in 1928 with $25 at the height of the Great Depression. By the 1950s, Fuller was probably the richest African American man in the United States. His cosmetics company had $18 million in sales and a sales force of five thousand (one third of them white). His comments in 1963 that "If the Negro had the amount of initiative, courage and imagination required, he could control the retail selling in his own community. Since he represents 10% of the population of America today, he would be able to employ 1,065,000 people. There are 1,788,325 retail establishments in America and yet in New York City, where there are over 1,000,000 Negroes, they do not own over 15 businesses which employ over 10 people." caused a huge outcry. Today, he is a footnote in history, all but forgotten. Or, should we mention Les Brown, motivational speaker who sacrificed in poverty, until he clawed his way out, or a dozen others who came from the same inner cities, the same underfunded schools, faced the same wall of hate and distrust, yet today are successful, and giving back to their communities? Of course not, they don't count because all of them are "sell outs". Just ask retired General Colin Powell, or even President-Elect Barack Obama. But remember, to point to this, is to be racist.

I'm told repeatedly by friends and family, not to rock the boat. That by presenting these views, I cost myself greatly, and put myself at great risk, both physical and career. My views, often aren't those shared by the average person, my passion for some of the issues that I argue worrisome to some. Much of what I present, is unpopular at times. As I stated at the beginning of this piece, I've been threatened with physical harm over some of my comments, and it's quite possible someday I might "annoy" the right person, and find my presence in this plane of existence at an end. But what is life without risk, what honor is there in the silence of the coward, where is the valor in the fight run from? I have lost because of my views, this is true. But in my heart, in my mind, in my spirit, I know that all men are truly equal. That all are worthy and capable of greatness. That all deserve of the rights to life, liberty and the opportunity to pursue happiness, and greatness. I may offend some as I continue to place more sacred cows on the grill. For this, I am truly sorry. I am always open to correction should I be wrong. I welcome the new knowledge and embrace it.

But I refuse to simply follow the herd, accept the official truths without question, or coast along meekly and accept what meager scraps I'm tossed. I want to win, or die in the attempt. Anything less, is a waste of what I could be.


Resources:

http://www.forbes.com/2008/02/09/teen-millionaires-startups-ent-success-cx-ml_0211millionaires.html

Revisiting the Past : Part 1 - An examination of the concept of Secession
Revisiting the Past : Part 2 - The Road to War : Causes
Revisiting the Past : Part 3 - An re-examination of the concept of Secession
- Bob Hubbard

The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
- Thomas Dilorenzo

Lincoln Unmasked
- Thomas Dilorenzo

U.S. Department of Interior, National Park Service
http://www.nps.gov/archive/gett/gett...03-lesson1.htm
http://www.civilwarhistory.com/slavetrade/causes.htm

Wedges of Separation In The Civil War
http://www.civilwarhome.com/sectionalism.htm

33 Questions about American History
-Thomas E. Woods Jr.

Politically Incorrect guide to American history
- Thomas E. Woods Jr

Bill Cosby: Poor blacks can't speak English
NAACP leaders stunned by remarks of prominent comedian
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=38565

Cosby Defends Criticism of Black Community
Actor Urges Better Parenting At Education Forum in D.C.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A6615-2004Sep8.html

Samuel B. Fuller
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_B._Fuller
http://www.issues-views.com/index.php/sect/1000/article/10031

====

Bob Hubbard is
the CEO of SilverStar WebDesigns Inc, a web design and hosting company specializing in martial arts sites, as well as an administrator on the popular martial arts communities MartialTalk.com, Kenpotalk.com and FMATalk.com. He is also a respected professional photographer specializing in martial arts event, nature and portrait photography. His martial arts photography can be found there as well as at his martial arts photography web site, martialphotos.com. He may be reached through these sites.
Copyright
2008 - Bob Hubbard - All Rights Reserved
This article may not be reprinted in any format without the expressed, written permission of the author.
 

Cryozombie

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Or, take another position. One where you can succeed in this country, if you only work smart and hard enough. I'm told constantly that this isn't possible, that you need to know the right people, have money already, to be connected, and that even then, the deck is stacked against you. My insistence that you can succeed, is met with disdain, despite countless examples of people rising from obscurity to success. People like Col. Harland Sanders, who had little more than a chicken recipe and a lot of perseverance, who went on to found a little known company called Kentucky Fried Chicken, or a guy names Dave Thomas, who worked for KFC, and later launched another little known company called Wendys. I hear garage and basement start ups on shoe strings don't work, but tell that to Apple who was 3 hippies in a garage with an idea that no one wanted and everyone said would fail. Or maybe tell Ashley Qualls that she can't do it. I don't think this 17 yr old will listen to you, being the head of a million dollar business that she started when she was 14 with 8 bucks to do Myspace custom profiles for friends. How about letting Fraser Doherty know he's going to fail. This 19 yr old jam maker is worth around $2 million dollars. Not bad for a business he started at 14. The list goes on, yet I still hear how you just can't win today with the big corporations stacked against you.

Bob, this was an excellent article and it's probably a discussion for another thread... but While what you say here in this quoted section is true, it's not always that easy.

You can't just start a buisness for 8 bucks WITHOUT some mad crazy plan or to exploit someone else's... Take Ashley Qualls... she had a mad crazy Idea that exploited Myspace...did great, But she also got lucky that Myspace wasn't sue happy and didn't take her to court. With no Incorporation and no insurance to protect her... she took a risk that a kid would take, and won. Excellent. It seems to me, MOST of the self starters that got going in the past with little or no money did so at a time when that was easier to do... struggled and clawed their way up. My uncle did it. He started his coffee business with the money he had in his pocket... but nowadays can you imagine doing that where just one "Oww the coffee burned me" lawsuit and you lose everything? Your buisness, house, car... because you weren't properly incorporated and insured? Not on pocket money. Nevermind the regulation on things like this nowadays. Lets look at Ashley again; I'm also betting when she started with that 8 bucks she didn't exactly do it "legally" but more in line with the Lemonade stand format. (Did she post her legal notice in the paper that she was doing buisness? For 8 bucks I doubt it... but here at least that's a legal requirement) I know what it costs to do that RIGHT, because I'm planning to sometime after the first of the year.

But, yes their are mad genius ideas available if you can think of them first. The Guy who sold 1 pixel hyperlinks for a dollar a pixel, made a million availible and sold out. One Red Paperclip. Odd Todd. (and Odd Todd DID get busted, but had made enough to cover the fines, hehe) Craigslist. But most of that stuff takes 1 important thing... Imagination... something we seem hell bent on quickly stamping out of mainstream America.
 

MA-Caver

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Bob, you write what you write because you have something to say of the matter at hand or there's something at forefront of that busy mind of yours that needs to be said :D ... You write because it is (so far still) your constitutional right to do so. You write because you're unafraid of what others think of what you think or say.
You write because of that burning need inside says you got to say something about this -- whatever it may be.
Your sense of rightness and wrongness about a thing (whatever) prompts you to write and speak out and you have a hope that someone will listen, contemplate and then finally nod and say... "you're damned right!" or at least say "you're wrong" and hopefully will add -- peacefully -- "and here is why..." and a civil discourse is begun where two minds (or more) will learn from each other.
Every one has something to say about everything. Even those lurkers here on MT. --wink wink wink NUDGE!
(sigh)

You write, Bob H because it's the right thing to do. You do it well I might add. Keep at it.
:asian:
 
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Bob Hubbard

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This started as a discussion on why black America has all the problems we hear about, based in part from the cop thread, and some other discussions. Problem is, I'm not black, and I scrapped alot of what I had, and switched gears. Each part could be a topic starter, and maybe the sections could be cut and pasted to launch some new threads.

Cyro's right, it's not easy. I've been self employed for 8 years, and it's a struggle. Lots of misteps, lots of lost opportunities, and I sure ain't rich, despite the quality of my work, care for my customers, etc. Annoys me, but I still think I can win, otherwise, why else play this game? Hell, give me 10 writers who can turn out good articles regularly, and I could attack BlackBelt and Inside Kung Fu. MT has more readers than both of them combined for example.

But I got asked "Why do you keep writing?". I never set out to write, to be honest, I hate it. Avoided doing it in school, but here I am, admin and owner of 3 forums, 4 blogs, and now turning out 30+ articles a month. LOL!
 

MA-Caver

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This started as a discussion on why black America has all the problems we hear about, based in part from the cop thread, and some other discussions. Problem is, I'm not black, and I scrapped alot of what I had, and switched gears. Each part could be a topic starter, and maybe the sections could be cut and pasted to launch some new threads.

Cyro's right, it's not easy. I've been self employed for 8 years, and it's a struggle. Lots of misteps, lots of lost opportunities, and I sure ain't rich, despite the quality of my work, care for my customers, etc. Annoys me, but I still think I can win, otherwise, why else play this game? Hell, give me 10 writers who can turn out good articles regularly, and I could attack BlackBelt and Inside Kung Fu. MT has more readers than both of them combined for example.

But I got asked "Why do you keep writing?". I never set out to write, to be honest, I hate it. Avoided doing it in school, but here I am, admin and owner of 3 forums, 4 blogs, and now turning out 30+ articles a month. LOL!
So, has a book deal been struck?
 
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Naw. But I'll be self publishing a couple e-books in 09.
 

grydth

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Naw. But I'll be self publishing a couple e-books in 09.

The reason you write is that you have something to say and wish to share it..... and if "it" rocks the boats of society, so much the better. We're too complacent and lazy in general, and we are better off every time somebody makes us recheck once again why some things are right and others evil.... and rethink our positions totally on some things. With all the "PC" pollution stifling our thoughts and expressions, too many are afraid to do that anymore.

I self published a book in 2001, and it was a terrific experience. It has become the standard reference in the field - very small field, though.:idunno: I got everything I was looking for - had to push myself to do the extra research and writing, was able to provide a reference for collectors, made a few bucks as well. People I'd never met before wrote me and came up to me at shows, some even asking for a sequel. That book is now almost done....

You can't please everyone and some will hate you. Too bad.
 

elder999

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Why do I write the articles that I write?

I’m just going to second what everyone has to say about this, but in my own way.

You write because you have to. Like any artist, or any other calling, it’s a compulsion-one you have a talent for. Talent, though, as I’ll point out later, isn’t everything.

Doesn’t mean you should stop. Or that you can-and, I’d add that this is America-or, at least it used to be. It’s still a place where I’d certainly agree with very little the "Dr." David Duke has to say, or anything the folks over at the Stormfront White Nationalist Forum ("White Pride all the Time") have to say, but I’d defend their right to say every bit of it with my life.

You, Bob, are no David Duke, and should keep on saying what you have to say-you say it pretty well, too.....

One where you can succeed in this country, if you only work smart and hard enough. I'm told constantly that this isn't possible, that you need to know the right people, have money already, to be connected, and that even then, the deck is stacked against you. My insistence that you can succeed, is met with disdain, despite countless examples of people rising from obscurity to success.

Like I said, talent, or a good idea, and even will aren’t everything. Knowing the right people, having money already, being connected-and, since you brought the "deck" into it, luck, have a lot to do with it. How many of us know extremely talented musicians, or artists, or writers who toil in obscurity, and probably always will? And, simply for the lack of these things: connections, money or luck- in spite of all who hear them or see their work, or read their words saying, Jeez, you really should be a star! or, Golly, you should get that published!, or That should be hanging in a gallery somewhere selling for thousands!

I’m going to skip to part of your closing, because it’s more relevant to what I’m trying to express here:

in my heart, in my mind, in my spirit, I know that all men are truly equal. That all are worthy and capable of greatness. That all deserve of the rights to life, liberty and the opportunity to pursue happiness, and greatness.

We all deserve those rights, and opportunity-true, but, outside of that we are not all truly equal.

Or else I’d be able to golf like Tiger Woods, swim like Michael Phelps, play basketball like Kobe Bryant, fight like Randy Couture, invent like Steve Jobs, and sing like Frank Sinatra.

Okay, I’ve invented a few things, fight pretty well, swim okay, and used to be an okay golfer. I can sing like Sinatra, but I nearly starved to death trying to earn a living with it! :lol:

In any case, not everyone is meant for the kind of success you’ve described here. We always will need people to pick apples and cut grapes-those things can’t be done by machine. Some of us will always be willing to hire people to clean our homes. There have to be people to do these things-though one of them may have the talent to achieve in another field, or start a business like "Merry Maids," the rest of them will continue to earn their living thusly, and some may even be content. Not everyone is "created equal." We may be equal in the eyes of the law, and equal in the eyes of the Creator, but-well, frankly, not everyone here has my "brainpower," though some may exceed it. Not everyone is going to have good looks-though, this is relative, women seem to think I’m pretty good looking, but I don’t-, or athletic talent-though, while not relative, this is, for some, attainable in spite of whatever. I know; I’m a congenital klutz, and I did okay......Or musical talent. Okay, I pretty much struck out there. Okay, I’m lying, I’m told I’m pretty talented in that regard, but it hasn’t gotten me much except hours of enjoyment. And, maybe, laid a few times.......:lol:

Not everyone can write as well as you do, Bob, though they may try.

Conversely, when I went to boarding school, my first year there I tutored my hall proctor-that’s a senior who basically "babysat" us underclassmen-in my case,m "preps," what most call freshmen. I tutored him in trigonometry, which, well-even at 13 I was good at, and, perverse as it may seem, liked-I was a sailor, after all, and my dad had taught me some trig for navigation. Anyway, someone else tutored him in French, though from what I heard, his French wasn’t nearly as shaky as his trig. In any case, the consensus was that the guy was about as dumb as a box of tire chains-okay, maybe not quite that dumb, but certainly not the brightest bulb on the porch.Probably as dumb as the tow hitch on a Ford Explorer :lol:. Of course, his father was chairman of a major corporation, and his family had BIG bucks and history with the school-they’d donated money to build a library, as well as a few other high dollar items-and the school’s primary purpose was to make sure guys like him got to go to Ivy league schools, like Princeton, which is where he went. Sounds sort of like Mr. "he got into Yale and graduated so he can’t be that dumb" Bush, but I know first hand that this guy is not too bright. This will be important later on, but for now, suffice to say that even without talent and will, money and connections can stack the deck in one’s favor-time and again.

Not all are capable of greatness-though worthy of it, perhaps. Some of us may never find the place where we might have achieved greatness- I was never permitted to play football, who knows how good-or bad!- I would have been at it :lol:. Luck-or fate- might have something to do with that. Some of us really might not have it in us, though, and just have to be content with where we are, or have our own definitions of success.

Gods help me if I dare to blame black America for causing it's own problems. Far easier to blame some mythological "man" for ones problems.

Causing some of its own problems-sure. Let me say here and now that I’m as removed from most of what people think of as "those problems" as you are, or even my more rich "friend" from boarding school. In this, though, I’m more than somewhat atypical. It’s also afforded me a few perspectives on the situation that both sides of the divide, in that I’ve been subjected to the same sort of judgments all of my life (from both sides) but completely distanced from them internally-my sense of self is such that no "man" is going to keep me down. A frequently cited example: when I was 8 we moved from the city to the suburbs-Westchester County. Ours was the first and for years only "family of color" in my neighborhood-which is another (mostly good!) story in itself. In any case, I came from a high dollar Manhattan private school to a very decent public school that, after a while, wasn’t quite sure what to do with me: I’d been taking French since kindergarten, , read at a 7th grade level-or, at least, what they were calling a "7th grade level," back then- and was quite comfortable with 5th grade math-of course, they didn’t figure these things out right away. At one point, I actually had a teacher-Mrs. Marantz-tell me that when I grew up, I’d have to be a janitor. This wasn’t in the south, back in the 30’s or something. This was in New York-southern New York, in 1968.

Of course, I laughed at her, and told her-as my parents had been telling me since I was 2-that I was going to college, and before the end of 3rd grade, I was in 5th grade......again, though, my sense of self had a great deal to do with my response, and was reinforced by my parents coming to the school and reading Mrs. Marantz the riot act.

So, just to begin with, I’d point out that in addition to talent, and will, one has to have a well-developed sense of self, self-confidence and a sense of independence to "succeed"-and all those things are instilled by one’s parents, usually-and that if they didn’t have those things, they usually can’t give them to you. If they aren’t around, they can’t give them to you. One might find them elsewhere-and, on occasion, possess them innately, but without parents to back you up, with the means to back you up, you’re usually just not gonna get anywhere.
I’d also point out that sometimes, sometimes "the man" isn’t a myth. Sometimes "the man" is someone you’re supposed to trust. Hell, it’s been my experience that sometimes , sometimes "the man" has boobies...:lol:

But slavery ended in 1865, 143 years ago from when I'm writing this.

Not....quite. "Slavery" as an institution may well have ended 143 years ago, legally, but there are two factors at work here, to my way of seeing things, anyway. One is that a sort of de facto slavery existed for black people for many years. In addition to not being permitted to vote, and basically forced to live with substandard conditions, and go to separate-and not equal-schools, there were the institutions of tenant farming and debt peonage .Black farmers of the south were often (usually) indebted to such a crippling extent that they often may as well have been slaves. Additionally, since you read almost as much as I do it seems, you should take a look at Douglas Blackmon’s, Slavery by Another Name. Mr. Blackmon is a Bureau Chief for the Wall Street Journal, and his book grew out of his efforts researching another story for the Wall Street Journal-on how U.S. Steel used forced labor-black forced labor-to mine coal in Alabama.. In it, he details how , under laws specifically legislated to intimidate blacks, tens of thousands were arbitrarily arrested, hit with outrageous fines, and charged for the costs of their own arrests. With no means to pay these ostensible "debts," prisoners were "sold" as forced laborers to coal mines, lumber camps, brickyards, railroads, quarries and farm plantations. Thousands of other African Americans were simply seized by southern landowners and compelled into years of involuntary servitude. It’s a system that Blackmon found carried on into WWII.

"Involuntary servitude," BTW is slavery

Add to that the rather extensive role that segregation, substandard treatment, and lack of voting rights had in the South, and you have an institution just as damning and oppressive as slavery. This led to migrations to the north, of course, where blacks were also often not necessarily welcome, though they did wind up being able to exercise more freedom.

In that time, equal rights laws have been passed, schools forcibly desegregated, affirmative action enforced, special grants and scholarships created, as well as reserved enrollment in collages despite academic ability.

Yes, equal rights laws were passed- against strong resistance. Mr. Blackmon, again, in the Wall Street Journal, detailed how J.P. Morgan & Co. funneled money from a northern white supremacist to segregationists fighting against civil rights in the south.Ironic name,btw,"Blackmon" he’s a white guy from the south :lol: There was also, of course, dramatic resistance against their implementation. Ditto desgregation.

Affirmative action is a troubling thing. I don’t think it’s necessary anymore, though it may well have been, but I also don’t think it costs anyone a job-though, with the changing economy, that may well change. In any case, we’re probably more in agreement about affirmative action than I really care to discuss here.

On the other hand, I have to point out that special grants and scholarships exist for a variety of people, of various ethnicities. There are even scholarships and grants for people who usually turn out to be pretty rich, like Mayflower descendents. As far as "reserved enrollment in colleges despite academic ability," I’d like you to show me where this has happened. In the meantime, I’ll point out that my corridor proctor from boarding school went to Princeton, despite his lack of academic ability,as do other "legacy brats," as do many athletes. I’ll also point out that scxhools like those in the Ivy league can typically find plenty of black people who qualify academically to fill any "reserved slots" they might have.

But should you point out the obvious, that to get ahead one must want to work for it, and that too often it's easier to take the easy route, and you are called a racist, a bigot or worse.

Well, no Bob, you’re not a racist. You see some things you don’t understand, as well as a few that you maybe can’t understand. You express yourself, and what you do understand, and don’t get understood in return. It’s the human condition, I guess.

But I only echo the words of Dr. William Cosby who said repeatedly that Black America's to blame for Black America's problems. He was of course, soundly booed when he did this in 2004.

First off, Bill wasn’t booed by everyone-some of us rather publicly pointed out that someone has needed to say those things for a very long time. On the other hand, the things he was booed for-a so called "airing of dirty laundry" have been an embarassment to the black community for years, and are part and parcel of what’s least understood about the legacy of slavery.

The institution of slavery in what would become the U.S. went through a variety of changes. In colonial America, even in the south, it was one where slaves were permitted to own property, families were often kept together, and there was a possibility of slaves buying their freedom. That’s what my ancestors did, back in the 18th.century. Shortly after that, the 1808 Transatlantic Slave Trade Act made the transport and import of slaves into the United States illegal. Of course, some illegal trade did go on, but the character of slavery started to change. No longer were slaves permitted to own property or buy their freedom. Families were no longer kept together, and, between 1808 and 1860, the population of slaves in the southern states tripled. Turns out, Jimmy "the Greek" was right-blacks were bred, traded and bred again like cattle. What this did was, within three generations, create a culture where husbands and wives didn’t stay together, or expect to. Where fathers and children didn’t stay together, or expect to. Where impermanence was the watchword, and where stealing, and subterfuge were a way of getting by, if not a way of life. After they were "freed," though, these cultural traits persisted-often, fathers would not stay with their families, maybe because they didn’t even know how, and so the trait was perpetuated beyond slavery into other generations.

Remember what I said about parents instilling confidence.? If all the evidence around you tells you that you’re worthless, and your father isn’t there to tell you otherwise, what hope is there for rising above that? And yes, through their will, or desire, some families did and do stay together, and some fathers did and do raise their children., but that, as much as anything else, is how you get a Fuller, or a Bill Cosby, or an Eddie Murphy, Tiger Woods or a Chris Rock-all men who were raised in intact families, and I’d venture that their fathers were as well.

In any case, while slavery no longer exists as an institution, its legacy lives on. So many are slaves in their upbringing-slaves in their minds, and those chains are probably hardest of all to break.

Keep writing and putting your ideas out there,Bob-discussions like these are the only way we all get to break our chains.
 
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I know too many people who are enslaved in their minds, sadly. :(

Thank you for that perspective and your thoughts. I appreciate it. :)
 

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First off, Bill wasnt booed by everyone-some of us rather publicly pointed out that someone has needed to say those things for a very long time. On the other hand, the things he was booed for-a so called "airing of dirty laundry" have been an embarrassment to the black community for years, and are part and parcel of whats least understood about the legacy of slavery.

The institution of slavery in what would become the U.S. went through a variety of changes. In colonial America, even in the south, it was one where slaves were permitted to own property, families were often kept together, and there was a possibility of slaves buying their freedom. Thats what my ancestors did, back in the 18th.century. Shortly after that, the 1808 Transatlantic Slave Trade Act made the transport and import of slaves into the United States illegal. Of course, some illegal trade did go on, but the character of slavery started to change. No longer were slaves permitted to own property or buy their freedom. Families were no longer kept together, and, between 1808 and 1860, the population of slaves in the southern states tripled. Turns out, Jimmy "the Greek" was right-blacks were bred, traded and bred again like cattle. What this did was, within three generations, create a culture where husbands and wives didnt stay together, or expect to. Where fathers and children didnt stay together, or expect to. Where impermanence was the watchword, and where stealing, and subterfuge were a way of getting by, if not a way of life. After they were "freed," though, these cultural traits persisted-often, fathers would not stay with their families, maybe because they didnt even know how, and so the trait was perpetuated beyond slavery into other generations.

Remember what I said about parents instilling confidence.? If all the evidence around you tells you that youre worthless, and your father isnt there to tell you otherwise, what hope is there for rising above that? And yes, through their will, or desire, some families did and do stay together, and some fathers did and do raise their children., but that, as much as anything else, is how you get a Fuller, or a Bill Cosby, or an Eddie Murphy, Tiger Woods or a Chris Rock-all men who were raised in intact families, and Id venture that their fathers were as well.

In any case, while slavery no longer exists as an institution, its legacy lives on. So many are slaves in their upbringing-slaves in their minds, and those chains are probably hardest of all to break.

Keep writing and putting your ideas out there,Bob-discussions like these are the only way we all get to break our chains.
True, it doesn't help that there are still narrow-minded whites out there who still feel that blacks are less than intelligent human beings despite tons of evidence to the contrary. Racism is diminishing but it's still there festering in the psyche of the blacks and whites of America, Hispanics as well in their predominate part(s) of the country. I include them (and other races though I may speak of only two at this point).
Amen to the statements that well to do/successful black Americans have become so because of the stable family life... though this isn't always true with every case. I know several well-to-do (but not famous) black men who came from the stereotypical broken single parent poverty stricken home. They succeeded because they were empowered, either by themselves or by someone who refused to see them than anything less than what they are -- equals among men/women.
That I think is the key that the young are reared in environments where they are seen as equals in mind and spirit and abilities and that the only differences is the pigment of their skin which is inconsequential. This should be the key, the same vein and heart of thought spoken by MLK Jr. in Washington D.C. all those years ago.
It has to be a cooperative effort all around. The treatment that both races give to each other and the nurturing/teachings at home of the young of both races.
Those sacred documents that we hold so dear which provide us with the freedoms that we have state "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness." should carry on to this and future days.

:asian:
 
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Bob Hubbard

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Actor Avery Brooks who played Capt. Sisko in Star Trek Deep Space Nine, seems to feel similarly.

http://memory-alpha.org/en/wiki/What_You_Leave_Behind_(episode)
  • Originally, the episode was to end without any ambiguity as to whether or not Sisko was going to return to his corporeal life - the answer was a definite 'no'. The idea was that Sisko had become a Prophet, and that was how it would remain for all time, thus confirming the Sarah Prophet's warning in "Penumbra" and "'Til Death Do Us Part" that if he married Kasidy Yates, he "would know nothing but sorrow." The sorrow was that he was going to have to leave his unborn child behind, and would never get to be with her after her birth. Indeed, the final scene between Sisko and Kasidy was shot this way, with Sisko telling Kasidy he would never be back. However, a day or two after the shoot, Avery Brooks called Ira Behr and told him he wasn't happy with the scene. He felt that having a black man leave his pregnant black wife to raise their child alone carried certain negative connotations that he wasn't comfortable with. As Terry J. Erdmann puts it in the Companion; "In the 24th century, the situation conveyed only sorrow. However, in the 21st century, there was a secondary social issue that had particular resonance." As such, the scene was rewritten and reshot so as to clarify that Sisko will return some day.

When I was in school, there were all sorts of free programs available. Mind you, I went to a school that was 80+% black. The ones I saw in the library, the ones I saw reading, the ones I saw staying after school for extra stuff not sports related, were the white and asian kids.

Buffalo has or had, one of the -best- library systems in the nation. Library card is free, and anyone who can behave can walk in and sit and read for a while. They used to have a number of free programs to help anyone who wanted it. When budget cuts were discussed a few years back, the library in the primarily black neighborhood that's named after Dr. King reported the lowest use of those programs. The white sub burbs, the highest.

My opinion is, if Johnny can't read, it's his own damn fault. At least in WNY, it's his choice to be an ignorant and illiterate person, and I have no sympathy for him.

Johnny needs to want to read.

I stopped doing retail because I got tired of the ignorance, rudeness and arrogance, and the attitude of superiority and hostility I got from people. The most common were the dumb people. Dumb blacks, whites and indians. People who choose to be this way.

Cases in point. While working at Picture People, (which isn't a budget photo studio like Walmart), I had the "pleasure" of getting my head chewed off by a 400 lb woman, for whom speaking english was not easy, after I asked her to reign in her child, who was hitting me with a prop. I got the lecture on how and I quote, "don't chew be tellin me hows to raise my chillin you damn cracker." On another case I caught the white trash couple I'd shot taking camera phone pictures of their proof shots. We had an employee colapse, crack her head. Blood was everywhere. This piece of **** mother kept demanding her pictures, demanded we drag the injured person (who was being treated by EMT's) out of her way, etc. Ignorant, Illiterate, Uneducated, Rude, Obnoxiouos, need I go on.
Pointing out that 2 of the 3 cases involved non-whites will cause some to label me racist, bigoted, biased.

I've read too many stories of people who came from nothing, who had nothing, who were writen off, who made it, despite a stacked deck and a world that counted them out, to give up.

I can be as good a golpher as Tiger. All I have to do is practice, find great coaches, and learn the game in and out.

I can be as good as Sinatra. Just have to practice, find great coaches, and learn the game in and out.

Fame and wealth however, are fickle, and fleeting, and while developing talent is hard work, fame can be as much luck and connection as skill and talent.

Look at my photography, then goto the book store and look through those coffee table photo books. Tell me if I'm good after you compare the 2.

As for Black America....I don't understand much of it, I admit it. From the fringes here, it's my opinion that it needs to solve it's own problems, build itself up, encourage education, and achievement, and police itself. There's nothing wrong with being proud of who you are, but arrogence should be discouraged.


Hope that makes sence, I'm nursing a headache.
 
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I went searching for a quote I vaguely recalled, and instead found that the person i was seeking had recently died. My original thoughts are lost in a feeling of sadness at the moment. But, here is the quote, and one other of his.

"Obstacles are what you see when you take your eyes off your goals"

"You have to want something bad enough that its harder to do without it than it is to do what it takes to get it."
---George Halsey


Rest in Peace George. :(
 

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I can be as good a golpher as Tiger. All I have to do is practice, find great coaches, and learn the game in and out.

Not if you don't have arms. Not if you're confined to a wheelchair. Not if you don't have legs. Not if you're blind. Not if you have an inner ear disorder. Not if your spine won't allow you to rotate properly.

Not if it's not in you, even if you have all your physical faculties, training and practice. You may become as good a golfer as you can-hell, I was a scratch golfer at 15, but that was as good as I was gonna get, I think-but you may not become as good as Tiger Woods-in fact, you probably won't.


I can be as good as Sinatra. Just have to practice, find great coaches, and learn the game in and out.

Not if you're born to have a voice like Kermit the Frog. Not if you have a voice like William Hung-not if you can't carry a tune to save your life, like so many people who embarass themselves auditioning for American Idol (admittedly, this is an inexplicable thing to me-the one truly God-given talent I do have, I don't understand how anyone can't sing, but there it is....)

Not even if you have a voice like Robert Goulet, would you be just as good as Sinatra-you'd be as good as Goulet, and that's just a little better than mediocre, really. :lol:


Look at my photography, then goto the book store and look through those coffee table photo books. Tell me if I'm good after you compare the 2.

Yeah, you're that good.
 
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Good points. But there are often, not always, but often ways around things like physical issues. Now, being aware of them, being able to obtain them, and then to use them, those too are challenges. But I believe it's possible for someone with incredible balance issues, no arms and no legs to hit a golf ball like Tiger. Might take em 50 years mind you, but I think it can be done. I won't argue the singing point....kermit told me to shut up and stop croaking once....really hurt my feelings. ;)

Reason I mentioned the photography....guys with the books told me I wasn't any good. My opinion is different, but they think a blurry nude girl standing in a shattered toilet in a neon painted disaster is art. I try to focus things, and avoid busted toilets myself. LOL!

What does black America generally, and America specifically need really, to fix itself? Are our roll models wrong, are our leaders wrong, are our values, our goals, our systems, wrong?

Because to me, it seems the answer is out there, solutions right under our fingers, but too many people are walking around so angry, so discouraged, that they can't see what's in front of them sometimes.
 

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Originally Posted by Bob Hubbard
Look at my photography, then goto the book store and look through those coffee table photo books. Tell me if I'm good after you compare the 2.
Yeah, you're that good.
Agreed and that is only having seen a small sampling of your work throughout your sites.
An artist is their own worst critic... hell I should know, being an graphic artist, photographer, sketcher, painter I've never liked any of my work except for a few pieces... ironically... folks like my OTHER stuff.

Talent is something indeed we are born with. Sometimes it can be nurtured out of nowhere and developed but it's lots of hard work and lots and lots of practice. Some folks just pick up a pool cue for the first time and never miss a shot.
It's tough to say it but some folks are born with a predisposition to be good at this or great at that. Some races it seems have that but look at where their ancestors come from?

There are a lot of people who can't sing worth a damn but they got record contracts, some people can't act but they get an a tony or an academy award.
Finding talent is something many people must do on their own. We all have at least one that we're exceptionally good at and at least a half dozen others that we would be very good if we nurture them and still a half dozen more would be decent if we work hard enough at them. Key I think is finding them.

As far as races and their self-application. Elder you went to a school that was 80% black... naturally you're going to see more of the bad eggs than the good ones. It may SEEM that the only ones occupying the library were just the whites and the Asians... did you find out? Did you think maybe some of the black kids were going to a part time job after school to help make ends meet at home? Or some had to be at home to watch their younger siblings so their single parent can go to their second (or third) job?
I've grown up and lived around predominate white neighborhoods and schools... I've seen just as many not applying themselves and the minorities applying themselves.
I've seen the lazy blacks and lazy mexicans and lazy asians and I've lived among the lazy whites. That affliction seems to know no color boundaries or preference.
It's only the few that truly succeed in our societies and it doesn't matter who they are or what they are... what matters is that they truly applied themselves and reached the goals they had in mind. Throughout history you will find those who were the brightest and smartest of all and gather them up together and I'll betcha you'll find the racial numbers to be spread out rather evenly.

IMAGINE the possibilities if everyone was given the chance to apply themselves (positively) all across the planet?
 

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Look at my photography, then goto the book store and look through those coffee table photo books. Tell me if I'm good after you compare the 2.
.

I'd say yes, but I just got done looking at the Pics in Caver's post with the Three Part history of the year in photos, and I'm still kind of in awe of some of those shots.
 

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As far as races and their self-application. Elder you went to a school that was 80% black... naturally you're going to see more of the bad eggs than the good ones. It may SEEM that the only ones occupying the library were just the whites and the Asians... did you find out? Did you think maybe some of the black kids were going to a part time job after school to help make ends meet at home? Or some had to be at home to watch their younger siblings so their single parent can go to their second (or third) job? ?

THat was Bob-I pretty much went to schools that were more than 90% white......:lol:
 
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Those shots in Cavers post were fricken phenomenal, IMO. Those guys caught some great stuff. I'm in awe over some of them. Mind you, I'm describing the quality of the shot, the color, etc. The content, that's another discussion in itself.


Elder you went to a school that was 80% black... naturally you're going to see more of the bad eggs than the good ones. It may SEEM that the only ones occupying the library were just the whites and the Asians... did you find out? Did you think maybe some of the black kids were going to a part time job after school to help make ends meet at home? Or some had to be at home to watch their younger siblings so their single parent can go to their second (or third) job?
Actually I think that was me who said that, but I could be mistaken. Library was during school hours, study halls, etc.

IMAGINE the possibilities if everyone was given the chance to apply themselves (positively) all across the planet?

Right now, I'm saving for a wedding reception, 3 trips, a relocation, a house purchase, and a photo studio/office launching. Ball park amount needed to do all that is about $200,000. My credit is crap, my car non-existent, and my savings nil. The weddings in May, trip 1 is May, trip 2 is August and trip 3 is October with the relocation/house planned the same month. Studio is planned for spring 2010 somewhere between Austin and San Antonio TX.
Uphill battle, against overwhelming odds, with the deck stacked against me, and most people telling me I can't do it.

NYS has a 5cent deposit on soda. I'm collecting pop bottles and putting every nickle into the kitty. Despite numerous demotivators, I'm inching forward. Despite a bad back, and medical restrictions, I'm doing what I need to do and working through the pain, to inch forward.

I might miss my deadlines, but I'll be alot closer to them than if I listen to the nay sayers (many of them family).

Heck, I got told that MT, KT and a few other sites I launched would never take off, were redundant, etc.
 

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That was Bob-I pretty much went to schools that were more than 90% white......:lol:
Thanks for the correction. :asian:

I might miss my deadlines, but I'll be alot closer to them than if I listen to the nay sayers (many of them family).
:idunno: I think you already know this... don't listen to 'em :uhyeah: That you're inching FORWARD is the difference. Wish you luck and the persistence to keep going.
Heck, I got told that MT, KT and a few other sites I launched would never take off, were redundant, etc.
Thank god they were wrong!! :D
 
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