Which sword art do you study?

Which sword arts do you study?

  • Western (European Long/Short sword)

    Votes: 23 10.3%
  • European Fencing (Eppe, Foil, Saber, Rapier)

    Votes: 27 12.1%
  • Chinese sword arts (Taiji Sword, BroadSword, Shaolin Sword, etc)

    Votes: 44 19.7%
  • Japanese sword arts (Kenjutsu, Kendo, Iaido, Iaijutsu, Battojutsu)

    Votes: 134 60.1%
  • Korean sword arts

    Votes: 32 14.3%
  • Arabian Sword Arts

    Votes: 3 1.3%
  • Other (Please post and specify)

    Votes: 22 9.9%

  • Total voters
    223
  • Poll closed .

Tswolfman

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I Study Koryo Gumdo At the Present Time However I would like to Expand my Horizons with Another More Developed Sword Art, I live In North Central Ohio Does Anyone know of any Instructors in that area.
 

Ojiisan

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Modified Mugai Ryu is that I can not do seiza waza. So sensei has given me standing versions.
 

Charles Mahan

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Ahh. I suspect that the term "modified" is misapplied here. The ryu has not beem modified. Some of the waza have been rearranged to make them more suitable to your training predicament, but that hasn't changed the ryu. If I do the Seiza waza of MJER standing, I'm still doing MJER. It isn't modified MJER. Waza are quite flexible.
 

Ojiisan

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Domo arigato for your clarification Charles.

Ojiisan
 
S

Shane Smith

Guest
I am competent with European Longsword, sword and shield, sword and buckler and armoured longsword.
 
S

Shane Smith

Guest
Kane said:
A few years ago I did fencing for about 1 year but I would much rather study classic fencing with the true rapier. However, there is no schools in the US it seems that teaches that stuff.

There are no schools that even teach European Straightsword Arts it seems which I would want to learn the most.
We do.Have a look around at www.thearma.org
 
S

Shane Smith

Guest
loki09789 said:
Look for Society for Creative Anacronism (SCA) groups as a starting point. Theatrical fencing is usually taught with 'authentic' or 'non competative' handle and blunted blade designs that are close to 'true.' I would still work with a sabre mask and fencing jacket. A sabre helmet has added protection from overhead slashing cuts because of the addition of a leather piece on top...well it isn't really 'personal protection' per say. It does more to protect your partners blade from getting nicked and scarred on your metal helmet:)
I must disagree. SCA role-play is NOT a martial art based on the true fighting methods of medieval and Renaissance Europe. It may be fun, but it isn't historically accurate nor is it martial in the practical or absolute sense.
 
M

Matt Anderson

Guest
Shane Smith said:
I must disagree. SCA role-play is NOT a martial art based on the true fighting methods of medieval and Renaissance Europe. It may be fun, but it isn't historically accurate nor is it martial in the practical or absolute sense.
Hi Shane!

Yes, I must agree, time spent doing SCA "fighting" will do little to advance knowledge or skill in the real martial arts of medieval and Renaissance Europe. What they do is a game, with a very restrictive rule set and "armour" requirements. I'm sure it's a really fun game, and there are those who are very skilled at it and have taken it to a very competitive level. It is not however, a martial art IMO.

This is something that those involved in historical European fencing really have to be honest and introspective about. Are you practicing a martial art or playing a game? Here's a pretty good article on the subject in general:

http://www.thearma.org/essays/MartialArtorCombatSport.htm
 
K

Keith Jennings

Guest
Shane Smith said:
I must disagree. SCA role-play is NOT a martial art based on the true fighting methods of medieval and Renaissance Europe. It may be fun, but it isn't historically accurate nor is it martial in the practical or absolute sense.
I agree, the SCA is a martial sport. This not being insulting, asthere are many SCA members who are skilled at handling weapons, and many of them are also practicing martial artists. Also, many of the top researchers in the Western Martial Arts community come from an SCA background. Still, it doesnt qualify the SCA as a martial art.

One troubling trend Ive noticed is at a number of WMA classes, that many SCAdians dont understand how to drill properly. Many times, they are too competitive to allow someone else to "win" a drill, and start fighting back or going outside of the scope of what they are supposed to be practicing. This can potentially lead to injury, and in fact someone very close to me was nearly killed in an accident involving an SCA member who wanted to "beat" his training partner while drilling. So, this has become a very big pet peeve of mine, and whether Im teaching or drilling, it really enrages me when I see this kind of behavior from students, SCA or otherwise.

 

pgsmith

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To answer the original question, I practice Shin Shin Sekiguchi ryu battojutsu and Kobu Shin ryu battojutsu with a little Toyama ryu under the US Battodo Federation thrown in.

Keith wrote ...
One troubling trend Ive noticed is at a number of WMA classes, that many SCAdians dont understand how to drill properly. Many times, they are too competitive to allow someone else to "win" a drill, and start fighting back or going outside of the scope of what they are supposed to be practicing. This can potentially lead to injury, and in fact someone very close to me was nearly killed in an accident involving an SCA member who wanted to "beat" his training partner while drilling. So, this has become a very big pet peeve of mine, and whether Im teaching or drilling, it really enrages me when I see this kind of behavior from students, SCA or otherwise.
That behaviour is not restricted to WMA. I have had several people like that come through the dojo. They don't understand the concept of training, and want to win. The only way to cure that is to have them practice with the instructor personally. Then, when they try and break out of the prescribed drill, you bean them one where you know it won't do any permanent injury and tell them to stick to the drill. I've found that it only takes two or three good bruises before they either stick to the drill, or quit the class. Either way, the problem is solved.
smile.gif
 
K

Keith Jennings

Guest
pgsmith said:
Keith wrote ... That behaviour is not restricted to WMA. I have had several people like that come through the dojo. They don't understand the concept of training, and want to win. The only way to cure that is to have them practice with the instructor personally. Then, when they try and break out of the prescribed drill, you bean them one where you know it won't do any permanent injury and tell them to stick to the drill. I've found that it only takes two or three good bruises before they either stick to the drill, or quit the class. Either way, the problem is solved.
smile.gif
Very true, I have seen this sort of behavior in many martial art classes, not just WMA. As the saying goes: no one knows more about Karate than a green belt; just ask one :ultracool

If they arent being a jerk about it, then I prefer to give them one chance, but then their gone. IMO, there is absolutely no excuse for injuring your training partner. Bruises are to be expected, but not injuries. Of course, it bother me even more when an instructor injures his students, but thats another story.
 

pgsmith

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Of course, it bother me even more when an instructor injures his students, but thats another story.
I've left bruises on students on several occasions. They can be quite instructive. :) I've never actually injured anyone though, either accidentally or on purpose.
 

Flying Crane

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I practice Chinese sword, both Jian and Dao (straight sword, and broadsword), both within the context of external arts, and Tai Chi Chuan.

michael
 

Cyber Ninja

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Ninja Biken...I am interested in several other styles but have no time at the moment. I would love to experience Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu and Yagyu Shinkage Ryu, as well as Fencing. If there is anyone out there who currently trains in any of the above mentioned styles, I would love to hear from you.
 
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