Where do you look in sparring?

Tez3

Sr. Grandmaster
Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2006
Messages
27,608
Reaction score
4,901
Location
England
Until I started wearing contacts I didn't look anywhere, too short sighted to see! The refs had to watch out because I'd hit anything that moved. I teneded to rely on instinct of when the opponent was moving. It's funny in hindsight but was a nightmare really. Wearing contacts was a whole new thing and I struggled for a bit to know where to look, in the end it seems I look at the chest and face area, except when grappling when I tend to close my eyes as I can feel for arms legs etc better with them shut!
 

Brian R. VanCise

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 9, 2004
Messages
27,758
Reaction score
1,520
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada
I look to the core which allows me to see their shoulders and hips which of course lead to their elbows, hands, knees, feet.. Everything that they do will come from there. Andrew also hit in on the head in that you should un-focus or relax your vision so that you see the big picture and pick things up well with your peripheral vision as well. You will pick up things faster this way. On a side note I absolutely love it when I catch someone watching my eyes. If they are a head/eye watcher then I feed them fakes with my eyes and walla they are in a world of hurt.
 

marques

Master Black Belt
Joined
Jun 7, 2015
Messages
1,187
Reaction score
382
Location
Essex, UK
Maybe around chest area, but without focus. Peripheral vision is "faster", and larger.
 

kravazon

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jun 6, 2015
Messages
22
Reaction score
30
Location
Austin, Texas
I think people's answers will be a good glimpse into whether they are sport or street minded. I look forward to people's answers.
I look at the center of the chest. Unless it's a women. Lol...then I don't know what to do.
I literally lol'd.

I've sparring with a few partners who look in my general center out of the corner of their eyes, but they always look unfocused. And then they reach out and get me good. It's super interesting to watch, since they're using their peripheral vision. It's clearly doing something to help them. I've been playing with it a bit.

I agree with a few people. As long as you're consistent and don't telegraph, I think it's fine. But everyone is different. It's definitely worth exploring how you spar best.
 

Buka

Sr. Grandmaster
Staff member
MT Mentor
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
12,995
Reaction score
10,525
Location
Maui
I think the natural progressions of this question would be - to those that answered, or have yet to answer - do you look at the same place if you were involved in a street situation?

Do you look at the same place if it's dark, or at least in the lower light of night?

Do you look at the same place if it's multiples?

Ain't I the nosey bastard?
 

Kung Fu Wang

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Sep 26, 2012
Messages
14,118
Reaction score
4,565
Location
Austin, Tx/Shell Beach, Ca
do you look at the same place if you were involved in a street situation?

Do you look at the same place if it's dark, or at least in the lower light of night?

Do you look at the same place if it's multiples?
If you are good with "foot sweep", will you use it in both "sport" and "self-defense", "single opponent" and "multiple opponents"?

A friend of mine used his "foot sweep" to save his job. 3 of his co-workers always tried to be bully on him. One day he asked his wife how much money that they had in the bank. After he found out that there were enough money to take care of his family for 3 months. He told his wife that he might lose his job that day. He then met with those 3 guys. One guy tried to punch him on his face, he "swept" that guy down. the hard falling shocked that guy and the other 2 guys. After that day, those 3 guys tried to stay away from him as far as they could. My friend finally retired from that job.

- You watch your opponent's leading leg.
- When he steps in, you step in at the same time, put your leading foot just 1 foot in front of his leading foot.
- If your opponent punches at you, you block it (not showing in the following clip).
- You then use your other leg to sweep him down.

 
Last edited:

Balrog

Master of Arts
Joined
Feb 11, 2007
Messages
1,764
Reaction score
482
Location
Houston, TX
I tend to watch the persons core. That seems to allow me the best view of their entire body. You can't effectively attack without involving your core, so in my experience, this makes me less likely to respond to feints.
This. I train my students to look at the upper chest, just below the jugular notch. Nothing happens without the core being involved; your peripheral vision will take care of the extremities.
 

Shai Hulud

Purple Belt
Joined
Nov 5, 2014
Messages
308
Reaction score
132
Location
St. Petersburg
The nice thing about sparring is that I never need to worry about other people jumping in, or something in the environment that poses either a threat or an opportunity. Because of that I've learned to focus on looking back and forth between an opponent's eyes, and her/his torso.
 

Juanpa Ookami

White Belt
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
11
Reaction score
6
I learnt to do not focus to an specific area, I was teached to have a periferical view, it doen't matter if you are fighting against one or several opponents, if you focus just in one area of the oponent you never will see the other oponents. But if you work on a periferical view, trying that your eyes work as a grand angle objectif in a camera, you will not be limiting your reactions.
 

Danny T

Senior Master
Joined
Sep 5, 2002
Messages
4,258
Reaction score
2,293
Location
New Iberia, Louisiana USA
Depends.
I tend to observe the chest area for the most part unless selling one target area and attacking elsewhere or looking for other opponents, weapons of opportunity, or means of egress.
 

Kung Fu Wang

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Sep 26, 2012
Messages
14,118
Reaction score
4,565
Location
Austin, Tx/Shell Beach, Ca
If your opponent applies "earth strategy", sliding his feet and move forward inch by inch, it's very difficult to detect his intention by watching any part of his body. You can only sense the "distance" between you and him is getting closer and closer.
 

Stac3y

Master Black Belt
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
1,103
Reaction score
40
I teach students to watch center mass with "soft eyes," not staring fixedly, but using peripheral vision and seeing directional changes by center mass and arm/leg movement peripherally. I disagree with the person who says you have to shift weight onto the front foot to move forward, btw; we train to move off of either the front or back foot.
 

Dirty Dog

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
23,406
Reaction score
9,173
Location
Pueblo West, CO
I teach students to watch center mass with "soft eyes," not staring fixedly, but using peripheral vision and seeing directional changes by center mass and arm/leg movement peripherally. I disagree with the person who says you have to shift weight onto the front foot to move forward, btw; we train to move off of either the front or back foot.

I like the description "soft eyes". I'm a center mass person, but if you fixate on any one point, you develop tunnel vision.
As for moving forward... I think it's more accurate to say you can't move forward without shifting your weight forward. If you throw an effective kick with the front leg, you pretty much have to move forward, even if you allow the impact of the kick to move you back to your starting position.
 

ChrisN

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jul 9, 2015
Messages
20
Reaction score
9
I always advise new people to watch the centre line as you can usually tell what people are doing from the shoulders and hips. Later on I say centre line but unfocused trusting your peripheral vision. Lately my coach has been making me work with my eyes closed.
In a street situation I normally look for the way out.
 

Jake104

Black Belt
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
680
Reaction score
244
Location
Gilbert AZ
I look into there soul through there eyeballs. Especially in a street confrontation. But also in sparring. In a self defense situation, I never take my eyes off there's. I can read people this way. You can really see the change if they get scared or if a sucker punch is coming your way. I have found out the hard way a few times. How important it really is.
 

JowGaWolf

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
14,065
Reaction score
5,987
It's easier to judge the distance by looking at your opponent's leading leg than to look at his core. Since your opponent has to pass your "kicking range" before entering his "punching range". To watch for the leg, you can not only sense his weight distribution, you can also sense the distance between each other. Try not to let your opponent to put any weight on his leading leg can make the fight very simple. The nice thing is, after your "foot sweep", you can enter. This way, your opponent's attack will trigger your attack.

Only looking at your opponent's leg means that you are going to get hit with a lot of punches.
 

Latest Discussions

Top