What would be the best secondary martial art ?

TKDJUDO

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Well guys, I've been training in taekwondo for more than 7 years and the thought of learning a secondary martial art has been coming up lately and I don't really know which art to choose. I'm looking for an art that gives me a taste of Grappling, throwing, striking (hand), and self-defense but not too sure which one would be benificial for me. My conditioning is up to par given the fact that i've been training in taekwondo for a while but not too sure if my body would adapt to the throwing aspect of an art. Here's some arts i've been looking into, hope someone can give me a quick description of each art, and which one would benefit me


Hwa Rang Do
Hap Ki Do
Judo
Kuk Sool Won
Muay Thai
Jeet Kune Do
Krav Maga
Systema
Wing Chun
 

Doc_Jude

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Well guys, I've been training in taekwondo for more than 7 years and the thought of learning a secondary martial art has been coming up lately and I don't really know which art to choose. I'm looking for an art that gives me a taste of Grappling, throwing, striking (hand), and self-defense but not too sure which one would be benificial for me. [...]

Hwa Rang Do
Hap Ki Do
Judo
Kuk Sool Won
Muay Thai
Jeet Kune Do
Krav Maga
Systema
Wing Chun

Well, if you're looking for decent grappling at any level, you're probably going to have to go for Hapkido, Judo, or Krav, though as far as Judo goes, very few schools teach the combat forms from the higher dan grades. You'd be better off doing some BJJ, but if stand-up grappling is what you're looking for, go for Hapkido, since it's not so far from your base art.
 
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Jeet Kune Do should cover everything you're interested. Since you have been involved in a TKD so long Hapkido would probably be a good choice as well.
 

Big Don

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Marksmanship, with a firearm you can stop your attacker without having to lay hands on him. Generally speaking, you can become a proficient marksman in far less time than is required for any other martial art.
 

tellner

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Well guys, I've been training in taekwondo for more than 7 years and the thought of learning a secondary martial art has been coming up lately and I don't really know which art to choose. I'm looking for an art that gives me a taste of Grappling, throwing, striking (hand), and self-defense but not too sure which one would be benificial for me. My conditioning is up to par given the fact that i've been training in taekwondo for a while but not too sure if my body would adapt to the throwing aspect of an art. Here's some arts i've been looking into, hope someone can give me a quick description of each art, and which one would benefit me


Hwa Rang Do
Hap Ki Do
Judo
Kuk Sool Won
Muay Thai
Jeet Kune Do
Krav Maga
Systema
Wing Chun

Find the best teacher in a school you will be comfortable staying with for a long time. Specific styles are a bit less important.

That said, you seem to be looking for a more practical and well-rounded martial art.

Systema, JKD and Krav Maga are closest to your stated goals. There is a lot there that will cause you cross-training issues specifically because it ventures into territory that is unfamiliar to you.

Hapkido, its descendant Kuk Sul Won and KSW's descendant Hwa Rang Do have a lot of TKD in them and will probably be easier to pick up in the early stages.

Judo and Muay Thai concentrate on more specific parts of the martial arts. But they are always good, solid choices. It's hard to go wrong with either of them.

There is a very good chance that one of them will end up as your primary system. I've seen a lot of people go from Japanese or Korean Karate to one or another of these styles. I have seen very few go the other way.
 

Mark Lynn

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I'd first think about what you want to get out of the school/style, which it sounds like you have done, however I would try and narrow it down some more.

Then check out which schools are within your drive time. And check out your schedule and see if these fit.

Then check out the schools that meet your desires, narrow your list some more.

Then check out the instructors and the students, which to be honest is to me one of the most important things to do.

Weigh it out and and then decide.

Hapkido is an art that is practiced in many TKD schools, as a serperate art or addtional instrcution often times at BB levels. So it will blend well with your current system.

HwaRang do or KSW are a little further away from your primary art but again there isn't a huge problem I believe with crossing over.

Muay Thai I don't think would be a problem either, but the kicks are different and the boxing aspect is different. But depending upon your system of TKD (how tradtional it was) the boxing aspect may or maynot be a cross over issue.

The JKD is moving further away from your art and this can be a cross over issue. The concepts and techniques are real different, the sparring is different. The grappling will be pretty good, and depending upon the school there might be weapons training as well. Which can be good for self defense training if you haven't done any grappling or weapons work before. However with the schools that teach a multitude of different arts (JKDC schools) you really need to check out the instruction because many times they will excell in one area and lack in others.

Time to gather the kids and go to grandmothers house so I'll finish my comments later.

Mark
 

searcher

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TKD is my secondary art, but if it was my first and I had the lis of styles available that you stated, I would go with KM. I have limited experience with KM, but I am thoroughly impressed with what I have seen so far.
 

TrainHardFightEasy

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Considering you're coming from a Korean MA background alaready and Hapkido has what your'e looking for It seems logical to me to go with that. Thats how we kinda do things where I'm from. You know what I mean, you're either a Jap MA guy, Korean Ma guy etc etc Well sorta.
If you do go with hapkido and want to advance your hands a bit more I'd just do a bit of boxing in my own time. Doisn't have to be anything to heavy.
 

Doc_Jude

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Marksmanship, with a firearm you can stop your attacker without having to lay hands on him. Generally speaking, you can become a proficient marksman in far less time than is required for any other martial art.

It's useless if you can't take it with you wherever you go.
 

Mark Lynn

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Had a great trip to the grandparents (my in laws) so I'll try and finish my post.

Not trying to bad mouth the JKDC schools in my last post, I was only pointing out that generally the instructors/schools will be strong in one area and sometimes weaker in others (which is just like any other school) so make sure they are strong in the area you want to improve in.

But back to the list.

Judo great sport, great grappling skills if this is what you are looking for. But this is pretty far away from TKD on the crossover scale, except for the competition aspect.

Krav Maga great system for self defense. I'm not knocking KM here
as a system as an art etc. etc. BUT make sure they have what you are looking for and you can get good instruction for what you are looking for. KM was set up on a system where a school was licensed to teach up to a certain point (say intermediate level), so with 7 years of training in any striking based martial art you will probably blow through the intermedaite material pretty quickly.

Wing Chun is as a striking art pretty different from TKD, and this could be a hard cross over.

I do believe you will do your self a favor to really sit down and try and decide what you are looking for in changing arts or systems. And then seek out only styles and schools that will help you meet those goals. And then check out the instructors and students of those schools and pick the best.

Seven years in any system is something of an accomplishment, you have begun to get a good sense of how to move your body, body mechnaics, proper techniques, ranges, feints, strategy etc. etc. So you will pick up pretty easily any other striking martial art system as long as you in a sense "empty your cup" and try and learn it. The grappling could be good to make you more well rounded but do you want to learn a sport form or a more self defense oriented form? And with your experience you should be able to pick out qualified instructors or be able to properly evaulate their students.

IMHO style wise, I would stay with something that compliments your TKD and this way it can enhance your training in both.

No offense intended towards any style or system and please forgive my mispellings in my previous post, I got off before I could proof read it.

With respect
Mark
 

arnisador

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Hwa Rang Do
Hap Ki Do
Judo
Kuk Sool Won
Muay Thai
Jeet Kune Do
Krav Maga
Systema
Wing Chun

Hapkido is a common self-defense adjunct to TKD. I like WC but don't know how well it'd fit with TKD. Judo and JKD may give you the breadth for which you are looking.
 

still learning

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Hello, My first vote for the best secondary martial art to consider? ....JUDO

That would be my third choice...fourth choice too...It is more than you think. Useful and not deadly....anytime you are off balance...by a Judo throw....the Judo person has ALL the advantages.

Best is to try it and see for yourself.....Aloha ( very challenging )
 
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TKDJUDO

TKDJUDO

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From all that is said here, Hapkido would be my choice as a 2nd Art for what you are interested in.


How beneficial would Hapkido be for me when I am already proficient in the striking aspect of a martial art ? I've been thinking of going with Hapkido for quite a while now, but my knowledge of this art is very limited. I've already checked out most of the Hapkido schools in my area and what I found to be very interesting is that some throwing and grappling is taught.

Come to think of it, seeing that I have no grappling or throwing experience whatsoever, how difficult would it be for me to adapt to the training style of Hapkido, BJJ, KM, Judo, or even Aikido where they stress the throwing and grappling. As The Boar Man said, which art would be the easiest to "crossover" into where the instrucors will be able to teach me quality grappling or throwing? I've already visited some schools, and the training atmosphere is no problem for me.
 

arnisador

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TKD comes from Shotokan Karate, while Hapkido comes from aikjutsu jujutsu. Hence, they are in principle very complementary. But over the years the two Korean arts have moved somewhat toward the middle, with HKD moving much more so than than TKD, so that some orgs. teach a version of HKD that ends up looking like TKD plus a few locks. You need a version of HKD that emphasizes the jujutsu aspect.

As to crossing over, the grappling systems are different enough that it'll be no problem at all--you won't feel many urges to use your TKD training as it just won't apply to the techniques. Grappling is something of an equalizer! Even KM and JKD aren't too bad as they're flexible--not technique-free like Systema but more toward that end. You'll hear people say "Relax" to you a lot no matter what way you go.
 

ejaazi

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How beneficial would Hapkido be for me when I am already proficient in the striking aspect of a martial art ? I've been thinking of going with Hapkido for quite a while now, but my knowledge of this art is very limited. I've already checked out most of the Hapkido schools in my area and what I found to be very interesting is that some throwing and grappling is taught.

Come to think of it, seeing that I have no grappling or throwing experience whatsoever, how difficult would it be for me to adapt to the training style of Hapkido, BJJ, KM, Judo, or even Aikido where they stress the throwing and grappling. As The Boar Man said, which art would be the easiest to "crossover" into where the instrucors will be able to teach me quality grappling or throwing? I've already visited some schools, and the training atmosphere is no problem for me.

You may want to check out Aikido!
 

Gentle Fist

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Judo is a great option and so is BJJ. BJJ will bring your other training to life since it focuses on problem solving and creating.
 

Remi Lessore

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Well guys, I've been training in taekwondo for more than 7 years and the thought of learning a secondary martial art has been coming up lately and I don't really know which art to choose. I'm looking for an art that gives me a taste of Grappling, throwing, striking (hand), and self-defense but not too sure which one would be benificial for me. My conditioning is up to par given the fact that i've been training in taekwondo for a while but not too sure if my body would adapt to the throwing aspect of an art. Here's some arts i've been looking into, hope someone can give me a quick description of each art, and which one would benefit me


Hwa Rang Do
Hap Ki Do
Judo
Kuk Sool Won
Muay Thai
Jeet Kune Do
Krav Maga
Systema
Wing Chun

Don't look for a secondary art, but rather study your own in a different way.
Studying and teaching krav maga has given me a renewed respect for taekwondo which I teach. Also, reading work by Iain Abernethy has opened my eyes to the real combat value of the karate patterns (... lets not pretend that TKD is not karate). Abernethy makes the point that if karate had not been a complete fighting system then it could not have survived as a combat system given that the Okinawans had to defend themselves against pirates, bandits and even samurai. In fact single kata were themselves complete fighting systems with multiple applications for given moves, many moves could be strikes throws locks, ground defences, etc.

To find this complete system within the TKD with which you are already familiar you might do one of three things:
Find someone (a karateka or taekwondoka) who has researched and teaches the locks, throws, ground work, inherent to your art and study with him/her,

or study a more general art - krav maga, JKD, military comabtives, etc and try to relate what they teach you to moves you already know from TKD. You will quickly see just how much more there is to TKD than you thought and how incredibly complete and art it really is.

or go to another art such as judo. Again, compare their moves to the poomsae you already know - they will teach the same move but for a different application. For example, what we in tkd see as a change of direction for striking, judoka learn as the footwork for throwing.

If you want examples and details of what I mean, email me at remi.lessore@yahoo.com
 
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