WHAT is the BEST SWORD for HOME DEFENSE??

Gordon Nore

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frankieus

I just scanned Canadian and US travel advisories for Spain. I had heard street crime was bad. My dad got mugged there in the late eighties -- not hurt, fortunately, but he was carrying multiple credit cards and hundreds of dollars in a small hand-held case. In the rush of the moment, he chased the attacker down an alley. According to the police, he was fortunate not to have caught him. As Carol pointed out, and you already know, street criminals seem to be organized. If there's one or two in your house, perhaps there's someone outside watching door.

I'm not a weapons guy -- I've had a little practice with the Korean short staff, some work with the tanto. My son, however, is very well versed in kali. One or two rattan sticks in his hands will raise welts and smash bones. Everything he learned with the sticks informed his practice of bladed weapons. Now, his empty-handed fighting is pretty devastating. His hands are are like a brick-layer's. It hurts beyond description.

What I like about his weapons stuff is that he's got reach over someone with a knife.

If you can get someone to teach you how to handle one or two sticks well, that can make your machete, if you really want it, a very effective tool. They way my son's school trains, they look at 'destroying' the hand. No hand, no weapon. The hand injuries are quite painful and debilititating.

Two weapons in this scenario is risky. Drop one blade, and you've given it to your opponent. Drop a stick, maybe not so bad. You may need that extra hand to grapple, or just get doors open and get out. With the FMA stick training, you get really good hand arm conditioning.

This documentary clip of Guro Dan Inosanto is a bit dramatized, but it does show how many strikes you can land and keep your range if the guy wants to stick you with a blade. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qH309YwzxsY&feature=related

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1024.html?css=print
http://www.voyage.gc.ca/dest/report-en.asp?country=274000
 

Carol

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Well... I don't want you to get the picture that this happens to everybody everyday in Spain, the same way that accidental fires do not happen to everybody everyday... But they do certainly happen.

I bought a fire extinguisher just after I survive to a fire at my home... The bottom line is that I don't want to survive to an intruder to take precautions.
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Understandable. :)

There are some excellent traditions of blade-making in Spain, particular in the region of Andalusia. Something you may want to consider is having one or two blades, even a folder (navaja), in every room...preferably where only you know where they are...so if trouble strikes you can easily find one.

For a ranged weapon, you may want to also consider a suburito. It is a long, heavy wooden training sword that is most typically used for the students of sword arts to develop their arm and upper body strength. Especially if you practice with this and build up your strenght to where you can use it easily (this is always easier for men to do ;) ) This can make for a very damaging impact weapon.
 

thardey

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frankieus

I just scanned Canadian and US travel advisories for Spain. I had heard street crime was bad. My dad got mugged there in the late eighties -- not hurt, fortunately, but he was carrying multiple credit cards and hundreds of dollars in a small hand-held case. In the rush of the moment, he chased the attacker down an alley. According to the police, he was fortunate not to have caught him. As Carol pointed out, and you already know, street criminals seem to be organized. If there's one or two in your house, perhaps there's someone outside watching door.

I'm not a weapons guy -- I've had a little practice with the Korean short staff, some work with the tanto. My son, however, is very well versed in kali. One or two rattan sticks in his hands will raise welts and smash bones. Everything he learned with the sticks informed his practice of bladed weapons. Now, his empty-handed fighting is pretty devastating. His hands are are like a brick-layer's. It hurts beyond description.

What I like about his weapons stuff is that he's got reach over someone with a knife.

If you can get someone to teach you how to handle one or two sticks well, that can make your machete, if you really want it, a very effective tool. They way my son's school trains, they look at 'destroying' the hand. No hand, no weapon. The hand injuries are quite painful and debilititating.

Two weapons in this scenario is risky. Drop one blade, and you've given it to your opponent. Drop a stick, maybe not so bad. You may need that extra hand to grapple, or just get doors open and get out. With the FMA stick training, you get really good hand arm conditioning.

This documentary clip of Guro Dan Inosanto is a bit dramatized, but it does show how many strikes you can land and keep your range if the guy wants to stick you with a blade. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qH309YwzxsY&feature=related

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1024.html?css=print
http://www.voyage.gc.ca/dest/report-en.asp?country=274000

All good points, but I would like to point out one thing that I don't agree with -- that is that "If you can get someone to teach you how to handle one or two sticks well, that can make your machete, if you really want it, a very effective tool." A bladed weapon strikes differently that a blunt-force weapon. You need to learn to incorporate a "draw" into the strike, otherwise the machete becomes an unbalanced blunt weapon.

Axes and the like are actually "blunt force weapons," since they "cleave" and smash what they hit -- they're heavy enough to not require a draw. (which is why they are more instinctive to use) But machetes are too light to make use of the edge effectively, unless used in a slicing motion.
 

Carol

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All good points, but I would like to point out one thing that I don't agree with -- that is that "If you can get someone to teach you how to handle one or two sticks well, that can make your machete, if you really want it, a very effective tool." A bladed weapon strikes differently that a blunt-force weapon. You need to learn to incorporate a "draw" into the strike, otherwise the machete becomes an unbalanced blunt weapon.

Axes and the like are actually "blunt force weapons," since they "cleave" and smash what they hit -- they're heavy enough to not require a draw. (which is why they are more instinctive to use) But machetes are too light to make use of the edge effectively, unless used in a slicing motion.

It depends on how sticks are trained. Filipino stylists generally do stickwork in ways that represent the stick as an impact weapon, as well as the stick as a (representative) bladed weapon...training on cuts and blade alignment instead of just impact strikes.
 

Gordon Nore

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All good points, but I would like to point out one thing that I don't agree with -- that is that "If you can get someone to teach you how to handle one or two sticks well, that can make your machete, if you really want it, a very effective tool." A bladed weapon strikes differently that a blunt-force weapon. You need to learn to incorporate a "draw" into the strike, otherwise the machete becomes an unbalanced blunt weapon.

Axes and the like are actually "blunt force weapons," since they "cleave" and smash what they hit -- they're heavy enough to not require a draw. (which is why they are more instinctive to use) But machetes are too light to make use of the edge effectively, unless used in a slicing motion.

Fair enough. I'm speaking as an observer of my son's FMA training. They train in much the way Carol describes.
 

Kembudo-Kai Kempoka

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One long knife. Something like a Bowie or a Divers knife. Then develop the skill set necessary to BE the thing that goes bump in the night.

Boxing, so you can absorb blows with your free arm that are aimed at your head, while launching a simultaneous counter: You can take some shots to the body, and still have vital seconds in which to operate. To the head? Notsomuch. Lights go out, and you're done. So's your family.

Parrying, trapping, pinning, countering. Quick dispatch cuts to arteries and veins, stabs in multiples sequences to vital organs and soft spots (not one stab, but 5 stabs in one count of time. One beat of the song, so to speak).

Don't worry about the 12 - 6 thing; it ain't gonna happen. Only one at a time will reach you. And should you find yourself somehow, miraculously, in that unique dilemma? Bum rush the 12:00 with multiple dispatch strike and slash flurries, and as he goes down under your rush, you can turn to face the second guy. Chances are slim, though, as he sees his buddy go down in a gushing pile of a dozen slices, that he'll do anything but change his mind and run. Most crooks prefer easy targets.

Tactial Planning Advantage: You can stash multiple knives all over the house, so that no matter where you are, you are within 2 long steps of a blade. That will give you more than enough time to respond to the first sounds of an axe head chopping down your door, even in the dead of night.

Training Note: Get over blood. Yours, and theirs. Survival in combat is a case of choosing to sustain injury in exchange for coming out the survivor. That means don't be afraid to take your shots, but remember that if you take one, be sure to give three while his attacks are still in the moment of opening your flesh or breaking your bones. And don't quit until it's done. Don't ever quit. You can always go to the hospital and get sewn up and casted later, but you have to be alive to do so. Emergency room bills are better than undertaker bills. Money spent on defense lawyers is easier to replace than the lives of ones you love.

D.
 

Brian King

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I was watching a couple of thirty year old kids playing a video game the other day and as they prepared their on screen fighters they chose certain weapons that they hoped would give them advantage and as they played the games they would hunt for weapons that would allow them to defeat their gaming enemies and proceed to the next level of the game. It is an interesting phenomenon and one in my opinion that should be guarded against even if it is in our nature. I am referring to the urge of focusing on a weapon as some kind of magic shield. If I have this particular weapon I shall be safe and more powerful than the one who has that weapon type of thinking. This type of thinking can be clearly seen when you talk to people who have bought for instance a firearm thinking that now that they have this shiny black equalizer that they are now safe, never mind that they have not taken lessons on its effective use nor practice more than once or twice actually using the weapon. They gain a confidence and a security from the mere procession of the weapon…until they hear of a firearm that has more rounds than theirs, or some magazine writer tells of a newer shinier whiz-bang and when hearing about this the feelings of insecurity and wants often return until the new ‘better’ weapon in processes. It can become an almost endless circle. This can also be seen in those martial artists that learn a perfect technique for a particular situation. They feel good that they can now survive and overcome this situation…until… they find somebody that knows the counter to their technique. So they now must learn the counter to the counter. This works great until they meet somebody faster than they are and with that speed the technique is beaten. So the martial artist works on getting faster and faster and this now works until they meet somebody much stronger than they are so they now have to work on getting stronger and stronger before they again feel that confidence that having the perfect xyz will protect them. It is my opinion that no decision should be based on fear. This goes for weapon selection as well as focusing on your assailant (or possible assailants) weapon(s). Focusing on the axe or whatever misses the fact that there is some creep attached to it. That is more the danger not the type of weapon. Fight the man/men not the weapon.

Theorizing about the weaknesses of your home, the routes you take to and from work can be an interesting exercise. Theorizing about the strengths of those thugs that would rob rape and kill can also be a worthwhile exercise. But for all the interest, all the theory, all the worthwhile considerations to become more than cerebral stealers of time a person must be willing to put the theory to test and to practice. Merely having the advantage of a ‘stronger better shinier’ weapon is not enough, knowing your enemy is good but in my opinion also not enough. Looking about and seeing your weaknesses and strengths, learning about those that wish you harm are steps towards wisdom but in my opinion the first step is realizing that security is an illusion, no matter how strong, how smart, how fast, how sharp, how accurate it will not be enough. Realizing that you will never have all the answers is the first step. Arming yourself is wise but it is just one of many steps a person may face. Worrying to much what arms with just delays the journey.

Just some random thoughts your mileage may vary
Regards
Brian King
 
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frankieus

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First I'd like to thank everybody for their help, really, I've learn a lot from all your post and I have summarized your advices in a way that I think most of us would agree:

1- There is no best sword but best sword for every situation and person! I mean, given a particular situation, like home defense, nearly every possible weapon have been advised, and all this choices are not just based on personal taste but probably on the individual being short, tall, slim, fat, weak, strong...

2- Since we don't know what room we're gonna be when the intruder breaks in, we'd better have a weapon in each room that fits that room layout. Which is kind of fine if you intend to have a collection, we just have to place our staff nicely... and wisely.

3- Whatever the collection of weapons we choose, we have to practice in its usage. Which is cool cause that means lots of fun!
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So we better choose weapons not only because they're good but because we fancy them, this way we will probably practice more.

4- We should remember that the combat attitude is even more important that the weapon we use, so we not only have to make sure we have our weapons ready but so our minds.

Said so, those guidelines let us lots of room to decide what and how, and in my personal case the first thoughts about the what and how is going to be something like:

1- Dooway - Gladius
2- My Bedroom - Katana
3- Guest Bedroom - Dao / DaDao
4- Dinning Room - Longsword / Dane
5- Bath Room - Stainless Steel Folded Knife & Anti-Wasp Spray
6- Corridor - Butterfly Swords / PuDao


The only thing annoying me is that crooks will have a sword in every room too, that is why I am thinking about some sort of sea cadet knot that I can attach to the scabbard so that if you know the knot it can be easily untied but if you don't it will take you a while to figure it out... Or any other sort of measure that would not make it easy for them to draw the sword but only for those that know the "trick", besides this will stop visitors kids to draw the sword and play with it.

In fact the winning trick that, so far, I have figure out so far is to attach a rope to the sword and to a metal puzzle (http://www.maxpuzzles.co.uk/metalpuzzles.html) If you already tried to solve one of these you already know that is not that easy, and even paying close attention it can take you long to solve it and separate the two metal pieces... till you learn the trick, then it just take you a split of a second to solve it ans separate the two pieces.

So if I attach one of these to the sword and the intruders won't have time, nor patience, nor the peace of mind necessary to solve the puzzle and draw my swords against me... And as for kids, well it will take them long enough to solve the puzzle so that I can wonder where the hell they are AND...
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I just thought up that I could add some little bells on the rope so that kids can't mess with the puzzle without me noticing :p hahaha... geee... this is fun! And again, thank you all!:asian:
 

dewey

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Without reading all 5 pages of this thread...I'd suggest the following:

machete

It will pass as a garden tool (e.g. chop up tree limbs) and not as a weapon. No legal issues to contend with.

Nix the blade in every room arrangement...that'll provide home intruders with equal access to your home defense weapons. Plus, that's just too damned expensive! I don't know about you, but I don't have that kind of money. You only need one...and keep it in your bedroom. Why? Because that's the only place in your home that you'll most likely be caught off guard (i.e. while you're sleeping).

Keep the machete in your bedroom, tucked under your mattress with just the handle sticking out. Place it by the head of the bed with the handle facing whatever direction it is natural to grap while lying in bed. That way, easy deployment in an emergency.

The machete is a perfect home defense weapon in that it is rapidly deployable, short length so no concerns about use in restricted spaces. Also, it's a hacking weapon...which means the more you panic and start swinging wildly...the more damage you'll do. Swords with fine edges must be "swung" at a specific trajectory (depending upon design) in order to be the most effective. Sure, they'll still cut or slice, but not as well if you don't get the angle & trajectory correct.

It's what I use for home defense.
 
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frankieus

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Nix the blade in every room arrangement...that'll provide home intruders with equal access to your home defense weapons.

Yeah well, that is why I plan to use a metal puzzle to lock the blades to the scabbard. I 'll do that in all blades but the one in the bedroom since chances are that bedroom is the last room intruders will have access to and, if they catch me sleeping, I don't even have to unlock the blade.

Plus, that's just too damned expensive! I don't know about you, but I don't have that kind of money.

Hahaha... Yeah, yeah.. it is, specially if you buy fine blades but that list is more a wish list for the future, I perhaps can afford to buy one good blade every one or two years.

You only need one...and keep it in your bedroom. Why? Because that's the only place in your home that you'll most likely be caught off guard (i.e. while you're sleeping).

Yeah, I agree, that is why the first blade I buy will be placed in my bedroom or close to it.
 
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