What is Ninjutsu?

Bob Hubbard

Retired
MT Mentor
Founding Member
Lifetime Supporting Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Aug 4, 2001
Messages
47,249
Reaction score
767
Location
Land of the Free
I'm opening the door here to a serious crapstorm.

Wikipedia defines Ninjutsu as thus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ninjutsu
Ninjutsu (忍術?) sometimes used interchangeably with the term ninpō (忍法?) is the martial art, strategy, and tactics of unconventional warfare and guerrilla warfare as well as the art of espionage purportedly practiced by the shinobi (commonly known outside of Japan as ninja).[1]
While there are several styles of "modern ninjutsu," the historicity and lineage of these styles is disputed.
Wiki also defines Shinobi or Ninja as: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ninja
A ninja or shinobi (忍者 or 忍び?) was a covert agent or mercenary of feudal Japan specializing in unorthodox arts of war. The functions of the ninja included espionage, sabotage, infiltration, and assassination, as well as open combat in certain situations.[1] The ninja, using covert methods of waging war, were contrasted with the samurai, who had strict rules about honor and combat.[2]
Going by a very strict interpretation of this, we can reason that there are no ninja around today, since Japan is no longer a feudal nation, nor are there currently warring families in need of such agents.

Their arts however do continue to exist, though some branches are controversial and surrounded by much disinformation and misunderstanding.

The modern Ninja would be someone who trains in the arts, skills, strategies and tactics of Ninjutsu.

But what is Ninjutsu today?

Some would argue that it is simply a name, that lends itself to whatever you want it to fit, from modern covert skills, to running around the back yard in black pj's kicking tires and trees.

For the sake of opening debate, I submit these simple terms.

To be considered Ninjutsu an art must:
- Have a verifiable connection to Japan.
- Have a verifiable connection to a legitimate ninjutsu family

To date, only 3 systems have fit this definition here: Bujinkan, Genbukan, Jinenkan. We do not consider Ashida Kim, Count Dante, Frank Dux or Rick Tew's arts as Ninjutsu.

But what of these?
Some are additional splinters from the 'Xkan's. Others claim different connections.

So, what should a style have as credentials to be "real"?
 

Bruno@MT

Senior Master
Joined
Feb 24, 2009
Messages
3,399
Reaction score
74
You assessment is correct in my opinion. No ninja today, but the arts continue to exist. And in order for something to be taught as ninjutsu, it should be a legit transmission of the art as it was transmitted by the ninja themselves. Otherwise, there is not really a point to using that moniker, is there?

Of course, the reason for unjustly using that moniker is to gain popularity or mystery by playing to the stereotype.

Now, from the list above, I am on the fence about Banke Shinobinoden, for a couple of reasons. It is true that there is very little 'proof' that what they do is actual ninjutsu. However, it is at least possible for the following reasons: they are Japanese and have a possible connection to actual practitioner, and more importantly: what they do has the look and feel of a genuine system, transmitted in an authentic manner.

The last part was mentioned By Meik Skoss. Arguably, he is not an authority on ninjutsu, but he is an authority on general koryu issues. If he says that what they do has the look and feel of a genuine system, then it is not a far leap to say that they do have something authentic. And if they call it ninjutsu and if it resembles ninjutsu, it is at least possible that it actually is authentic ninjutsu.

As for the splinter orgs: to call what they do ninjutsu, there are 3 criteria
1) off shoot of an X kan
2) the person starting the org should have gotten a complete transmission in the Xkan.
3) the teaching in the off shoot should remain true to the teachings from the original Xkan

Anything else, and it is a safe bet to say that 'ninjutsu' is just their buzzword and not related to authentic ninjutsu at all.
 
Last edited:

Archangel M

Senior Master
Joined
Dec 5, 2007
Messages
4,555
Reaction score
154
I wonder. Would modern special ops guys like Delta with all of their skills have qualified as a "way" if they could step in a time machine back to feudal Japan? Besides their antiquity, their novelty and their mysteriousness, what makes the ninja/ninjutsu somehow more kick *** than modern military/espionage operatives?
 

Bruno@MT

Senior Master
Joined
Feb 24, 2009
Messages
3,399
Reaction score
74
That is easy: the draw of the ninja ways are the myths and legends, as well as ancient weaponry.

Would spec ops have been recognized as a way... I don't know. You have to keep in mind it is more than just the techniques. Ninjutsu was a way of life, secrecy, traditional transmission, ... Ninjutsu was the combination of all those things, including the underlying concepts that define the fighting and survival skills.

Would your spec ops guys be recognized as ninja? I don't know. But given that all spec ops teams around the world are made up of people for whom their 'art' is a way of life, have ways of transmitting their teachings in a uniform way, have an underlying philosophy to their art.... I think that they would fit in under a distinct moniker, be it 'ninjutsu' or something else.
 

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
14,712
Reaction score
2,796
Location
Michigan
Since I began posting on MT, I have learned a lot about the martial arts generally termed 'ninjutsu'. I have a much more open mind about practitioners than I did before. Still don't know much, but I get the general idea. My hat is off to serious practitioners; they must have cast-iron self-confidence to be able to endure both the giggle-factor from the general public as well as the endless questions from overly imaginative but enthusiastic would-be ninjer pimple-faced 'youts' who never dated a woman that didn't have to be inflated.
 

Omar B

Senior Master
Joined
Nov 6, 2007
Messages
3,687
Reaction score
85
Location
Queens, NY. Fort Lauderdale, FL
Interesting Bill. Though I don't see the whole ninja thing as that separate from karate in most of the public's eyes. Usually someone hears karate and they start making Bruce Lee noises and bouncing around, most people don't even know the difference between karate and kung fu.

That reminds me, I once read this hilarious review of the GI Joe movie where the author clearly knew nothign about martial arts. He constantly talked about Snakes Eyes learning ninjutsu from some old "Kung Fu guy." There's a lot of ignorance when it comes to the martial arts, within the community yes, but a heck of a lot more without.
 

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
14,712
Reaction score
2,796
Location
Michigan
Interesting Bill. Though I don't see the whole ninja thing as that separate from karate in most of the public's eyes. Usually someone hears karate and they start making Bruce Lee noises and bouncing around, most people don't even know the difference between karate and kung fu.

Most of the people I know seem to equate 'karate' with TKD. Not a few of them tell me "Oh yeah, I took TKD as a kid!" However, they seem to think of 'ninjas' as movie stuff of teenage mutant turtles.

In my own experience here on MT, I have seen an awful lot of serious discussion of what it clearly the 'real' art of ninjutsu, as well as a lot of posts by what appear to be kids or adults with maturity issues looking for the most awesomest ninja sword or tattoo or asking if ninjas can really climb walls, jump backwards into trees, or become invisible. In support of that, I note "Ask a Ninja" is not "Ask a Karateka."

That reminds me, I once read this hilarious review of the GI Joe movie where the author clearly knew nothign about martial arts. He constantly talked about Snakes Eyes learning ninjutsu from some old "Kung Fu guy." There's a lot of ignorance when it comes to the martial arts, within the community yes, but a heck of a lot more without.

It's all good. I sincerely mean no offense. This has just been my observation and opinion.
 

Bester

<font color=blue><B>Grand UberSoke, Sith-jutsu Ryu
Joined
Jan 11, 2004
Messages
848
Reaction score
55
Location
Everywhere
You can compare the functions of a special op team to the role of the historical ninja. But just because someone does the same job in a similar way, it doesn't mean they deserve the same title. Ninjutsu is a Japanese art, with Japanese roots, period.
 

Archangel M

Senior Master
Joined
Dec 5, 2007
Messages
4,555
Reaction score
154
Well, Im not saying that they "are ninja". That would be silly. But what is it that the ninja did that our modern "warriors" can't do now? And what makes their "way" so much more advanced or desired than what can be offered in modern times?
 

Brian R. VanCise

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 9, 2004
Messages
27,758
Reaction score
1,515
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada
Well, Im not saying that they "are ninja". That would be silly. But what is it that the ninja did that our modern "warriors" can't do now? And what makes their "way" so much more advanced or desired than what can be offered in modern times?

If you look at modern spec ops, etc. they have in general far less hand to hand combat skills. Of course they have great weapon skills that are current with today's standards. That is one of their specialities. Mental fortitude, working behind enemy lines, etc. create for a lot of similarities. Yet in the end the ancient Japanese warriors were just that ancient Japanese warriors and today's military elite are today's military elite. There are similarities and yet lots of differences!
icon6.gif
 

Archangel M

Senior Master
Joined
Dec 5, 2007
Messages
4,555
Reaction score
154
I know that line troops get almost useless H2h training, but some of the alphabet soup guys do get some pretty extensive combative training. Enough to build a system? Well no, but much like the "real Ninja" probably were. They concentrate on accomplishing their mission. All the skills and weapons are just tools. I guess my question is why do we modern people tend to think that Ninjutsu is something that has no modern equivalent?
 

Archangel M

Senior Master
Joined
Dec 5, 2007
Messages
4,555
Reaction score
154
The question I am trying to get to is why would a modern man/woman want to learn "Ninjutsu" instead of finding training in H2H, modern weaponcraft, espionage tradecraft etc? If Im not mistaken, even the Soke himself isnt teaching "Ninjutsu". Can any modern person really become a "ninja" these days anyway? I think you would have better odds at becoming a Delta Operator or a SEAL.
 

Bruno@MT

Senior Master
Joined
Feb 24, 2009
Messages
3,399
Reaction score
74
The question I am trying to get to is why would a modern man/woman want to learn "Ninjutsu" instead of finding training in H2H, modern weaponcraft, espionage tradecraft etc? If Im not mistaken, even the Soke himself isnt teaching "Ninjutsu". Can any modern person really become a "ninja" these days anyway? I think you would have better odds at becoming a Delta Operator or a SEAL.

Would you 'want' to learn ninjutsu instead of the modern equivalent?
That really depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you want to be active as a professional in the field of spec ops, then I would encourage you to seek out the modern equivalent because the problems that need solving today are not the problems that had to be solved yesteryear, and the skills which were valuable then are not the skills which would be valuable now.

And if you would want to make ninjutsu useful for today, you would have to make quite a lot of changes to it in order to be relevant to the field of spec ops. Even if you want to apply the arts to self defense, you need to make changes to the way it is trained because the assumptions and attacks of today are different from those a couple hundred years ago in feudal Japan.

However, there are also people who want to learn the art for the sake of learning the art. People like me for example. I learn the traditional JMA because I love them. Because they teach me a specific approach towards fighting, because they teach me things about myself, ... because I get things out of them that I find valuable.

It's a bit like people wanting to learn archery like it was practiced a long time ago. I did that as well. I learned to shoot a wooden bow without stabilisers, sights or any of the dozen other things that are used in modern bows. I did that because I loved doing it like that, not because I cared about getting the smallest possible arrow grouping that is achievable by using the best modern technology. And while I was quite good and sometimes my grouping was as tight as 2 inches on 25 yards, on average the guys with modern compound bows would shoot a -much- tighter grouping over a larger distance.

The same applies to the original art of ninjutsu imo.
 

Chris Parker

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Feb 18, 2008
Messages
6,163
Reaction score
1,006
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Hey Bob,

I'm opening the door here to a serious crapstorm.

Ha, cool. Let's have some fun, then, shall we?

Wikipedia defines Ninjutsu as thus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ninjutsu
Wiki also defines Shinobi or Ninja as: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ninja
Going by a very strict interpretation of this, we can reason that there are no ninja around today, since Japan is no longer a feudal nation, nor are there currently warring families in need of such agents.

Well, far be it from me to challenge wiki as a source.... but to be frank, that is a limited definition. For example, it is currently thought, or believed, that many who were classified as Shinobi no Mono, Ninja, Rappa, Suppa, or some other variant, were Samurai themselves, either deposed in some way, or simply acting in a less-than-romantically-idealised way. That said, there also seems to be quite a bit of evidence of factions not necessarily related to the Samurai who lay some claim to that legacy as well. Hmm, a little complicated, isn't it?

Of course, the last comment about there being no "ninja" around these days, that is absolutely correct. There are people practicing the arts, but that, honestly, doesn't make them (or me.... aw, sad, my little ideal is all burst....) "ninja", any more than training with a sword makes you a Samurai (a distinct social class that was abolished with the Meiji Restoration of 1862).

Their arts however do continue to exist, though some branches are controversial and surrounded by much disinformation and misunderstanding.

The modern Ninja would be someone who trains in the arts, skills, strategies and tactics of Ninjutsu.

Er, no. That would be a practitioner of Ninjutsu, not a Ninja. Subtle, but important difference.

But what is Ninjutsu today?

Some would argue that it is simply a name, that lends itself to whatever you want it to fit, from modern covert skills, to running around the back yard in black pj's kicking tires and trees.

They may, but that is the same as arguing that my Mazda is a Maserati. Doesn't make it so (although one day....). And, uh, "kicking" tyres?

For the sake of opening debate, I submit these simple terms.

To be considered Ninjutsu an art must:
- Have a verifiable connection to Japan.
- Have a verifiable connection to a legitimate ninjutsu family

To date, only 3 systems have fit this definition here: Bujinkan, Genbukan, Jinenkan. We do not consider Ashida Kim, Count Dante, Frank Dux or Rick Tew's arts as Ninjutsu.

You have learned much, young Bob.... Although I may question the last one. For that, you need to define "ninjutsu family", and that I don't think is that easy. A connection to a legitimate Ninjutsu Ryu-ha, on the other hand, is what I would look for. For clarity, a family is "ke", a clan is "gumi", and a Ryu is "style", although the best way to understand it is to realise that the character for "ryu" is also pronounced "nagashi", and means "flow". In other words, a Ryu is the flow of the teachings that make up it's character and approach, passing (flowing) from one generation down to the next, and down from the Ryuso (founder) to the current students and teachers of the knowledge.


But what of these?
Founded by Steven Hayes, who got his schooling from Hatsumi Masaaki, and Tanemura Tsunehisa (Shoto), providing a link back to Japan and the Ryu associated with the traditions of Ninjutsu. Removed from the Japanese approach, but still within reach to make a claim.
Ah, my favourite. Has that become apparent? Sorry... Right, Katori Shinto Ryu is a Sogo Bujutsu (composite martial art school) focusing on the use of the sword, but including many other areas, including higher level teachings in esoteric studies such as Ninjutsu. However the approach to Ninjutsu here is very different, it is used more to refer to counter-espionage than actual use of Ninjutsu skills. You may almost think of it as anti-Ninjutsu, really. The Ninjutsu portion of the curriculum makes up very little of the teachings from all accounts, and is taught by direct transmission via word of mouth (Kuden, oral tranmission). Not a Ninjutsu system, but a system that incorporates knowledge of Ninjutsu within it's teachings.
Originally bases it's approach on the teachings of Doron Navon, the first Western instructor under Hatsumi Masaaki. These days it incorporates a number of other sources and influences (such as Judo and TKD), removing it from the original Ninjutsu aspects. However, the connection to the established Japanese art is definately there. Gets a pass, but be aware that just because the Ninjutsu traditions are taught, doesn't make everything there related to these Japanese systems.
Ah, interesting. My instinct is no, honestly. There's just too much that doesn't "feel" right in the actions of the systems, despite them being able to give an approach that is very akin to the way such a system would be passed down. But the best evidence they have presented so far includes that they don't claim to be an old system (koryu), they have the support of the Museum they are honorary curators of, and they have a vocal supporter in Spain (although his claims tend to disagree with the claims of Kawakami Jinichi and the Banke Shinobinoden themselves). Oh, and to break it down, Banke is "Ban family (ke)", a famous old Ninja family, and Shinobinoden is simply "Shinobi/Nin(ja) transmissions (no den)". Without being able to demonstrate why their traditions are related to the Ban family (which I have heard a few different explainations of, including a reference to the Bansenshukai, a classic treatise on the subject, not related to the Ban family at all), I'm left less than convinced.
Hmm. While Carlos has an old link to Tanemura and Bo Munthe (himself not without controversy, by the way...), he has gone more and more to unsubstantiated "Koga" style teachings. My feeling is that this group has long left any links to anything close to legit, so I'd go with no again.
The Bansenshukai guys certainly have the links back to the Japanese traditions, so they're in the same kind of boat as Toshindo. A pass, to my mind.
South African Koga Ninjutsu? Uh, no.
Ah, these guys. Don't know them personally, but from the clips I watched with their "rescue of muggers" publicity, they actually seem to be an offshoot from my schools. There's a fair amount of fantasy in their approach, but it seems to have links back to Japan through us (when they left, judging on their syllabus and class approach) we were still part of the Bujinkan.

While I'm here, I'll add us as well www.ninjutsuaustralia.com Well, I'm going to give us a pass here, as well. The link is back to Japan through Hatsumi Masaaki and Nagato Toshiro, and the teachings for the traditional approach we take is based on the Bujinkan Ryu-ha as we understand them (Gyokko Ryu, Koto Ryu, Togakure Ryu, Kukishinden Ryu, and the Ten Chi Jin Ryaku no Maki. We do sometimes bring in the more "samurai" systems as well, but the focus for us is on the Ninjutsu-related systems).

Some are additional splinters from the 'Xkan's. Others claim different connections.

There are a few other Koryu who have Ninjutsu aspects in their teachings, but if there is not a connection to one of those, or directly to Takamatsu via Hatsumi, Tanemura, Manaka, then it doesn't get a pass.

So, what should a style have as credentials to be "real"?

The above listed connections, really. To give my definitions, though, a Ninjutsu system is more defined by it's historical connections and usage than it's physical technologies (although those techical approaches must be congruent with the claims, and the less-legit simply aren't). As a result, it is impossible to create a "new" Ninjutsu system, the same way you cannot create any new Baroque music outside of the Baroque period. You can create Baroque-inspired music, but that is different.

I wonder. Would modern special ops guys like Delta with all of their skills have qualified as a "way" if they could step in a time machine back to feudal Japan? Besides their antiquity, their novelty and their mysteriousness, what makes the ninja/ninjutsu somehow more kick *** than modern military/espionage operatives?

Would spec. ops guys be considered the equivalent of Ninja? Bluntly, no. Not at all. This supposition has a lack of understanding of what the Ninja were, as well as what the Special Forces are today, they are both very different. To begin with, it's really a mistake to get caught up in "all their skills". Most evidence indicates that the "average ninja field agent" was probably about 16 years old (same as Samurai being considered men at 15, and often on the battlefield before that), and would not really be skilled in anywhere near as many areas as shown in modern media, or even as taught in schools these days (frankly, I mean that to refer to the Ninjutsu schools, but they wouldn't be as schooled in as wide a range of subjects as a modern Western High School student).

The next thing to consider is the underlying reasons for why these skills are developed. For the Spec. Forces guys, it's part of a career, a military speciality. This is more in line with high ranked Samurai than Ninja.

As to whether or not their skills would be considered a "way", well, a "way" can be found in anything. But the concept there is an Asian one, so a Western military professional probably wouldn't think that way. And again, the "skills" are less important here, the "way" aspect is seperate from that. Oh, and Ninja are more kickass because, um, er.... can I get back to you on that one?
 

Dean Whittle

Yellow Belt
Joined
Feb 28, 2005
Messages
36
Reaction score
1
Just to add a little more to the Ninja Senshi ryu part ... this school is taught by Kaylan Soto, a gentlemen who trained with me in 2001 for 12mths, achieving a 6th kyu rank. He then trained in the Bujinkan for some years gaining a Sandan (3rd degree) under Andrew Beattie. He may have undertaken more training since then, but 'google-jutsu' doesn't reveal anything further :)

He operates his school as an independent dojo, unaffiliated with any of the larger x-kans.

With respect
 

Vulcan

Orange Belt
Joined
Jun 22, 2010
Messages
64
Reaction score
0
*golf clap* Excellent post Chris. Your scholar bu came in really handy here.


I would like to hear what's missing from the conversation and definition. Namely, the cultural, spiritual, and anthropological aspects of Ninpo, which I consider more relevant to the uniqueness of their way (or the legend thereof) .

Taijutsu has a lot of parallels in other hand to hand combat styles (was hand to hand combat the essence of Ninjutsu anyway?...not sure about this), but (my understanding) of the Ninpo approach to Mikky&#333; (&#23494;&#25945;) seems to be different from the way it is approached in other schools of thought that incorporate martial arts, Buddhism, Chinese philosophy/Tai Chi/Tao Te Ching/Kung Fu (yes, these things heavily influenced/inspired Ninjutsu it seems from the parallels ) such as S&#333;hei and Yamabushi (or even Samurai with Zen teachers, such as the Yagy&#363; clan ).




It's quite early for me to drag out the tomes, but later I will contribute more.

Flame away.*takes cover in a cloud of metsubishi smoke*
 
Last edited:

Chris Parker

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Feb 18, 2008
Messages
6,163
Reaction score
1,006
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Hi James,

*golf clap* Excellent post Chris. Your scholar bu came in really handy here.

Thanks.

I would like to hear what's missing from the conversation and definition. Namely, the cultural, spiritual, and anthropological aspects of Ninpo, which I consider more relevant to the uniqueness of their way (or the legend thereof) .

Ah, now here is where it all gets a little muddy... One thing to remember is that you are dealing with a range of disparate groups all under this umbrella heading here, and different groupings would be influenced by different things and aspects in different measures. For example, Togakure Ryu is said to have been highly influenced by the Shugendo practices of ascetics on Togakure Yama, but that doesn't mean that it was a major, or even minor influence on other groups and systems.

Taijutsu has a lot of parallels in other hand to hand combat styles (was hand to hand combat the essence of Ninjutsu anyway?...not sure about this), but (my understanding) of the Ninpo approach to Mikky&#333; (&#23494;&#25945;) seems to be different from the way it is approached in other schools of thought that incorporate martial arts, Buddhism, Chinese philosophy/Tai Chi/Tao Te Ching/Kung Fu (yes, these things heavily influenced/inspired Ninjutsu it seems from the parallels ) such as S&#333;hei and Yamabushi (or even Samurai with Zen teachers, such as the Yagy&#363; clan ).

Ah, Mikkyo.... that has been a cause of some consternation in the Ninjutsu community for many years now. Essentially, Steven Hayes has been the biggest promoter of this idea, coming from his own personal journey, and loosely supported by any other evidence. In fact, there are many stories about Western students asking the Japanese Shihan about Mikkyo and it's importance in Ninpo, only to get the rather illusion shattering "What's that?" in reply.

In regard to your influences to Ninjutsu, well, let's go through those, shall we? Japan is unusual (particularly from a Western point of view) in that a person can be said to have various religious following, in other words, it's considered perfectly fine and normal to be multi-theistic. You can be a Buddhist, and Shintoist at once, with no contradiction whatsoever. So most people have a fair amount of exposure to each of the traditions and belief systems, so that will be an influence on pretty much everything. Add to that the way that China was looked to for much of early Japans history as the source for knowledge and refinement, and the way that a person was considered learned was that they knew the 5 Chinese Classics, which included the Tao Te Ching and Sun Tzu, and we see that what you're really saying here is that Buddhism, Confusionism, Chinese Philosophy, along with Shinto, were influences on most things Japanese, including Ninjutsu and other martial arts. Yep, agreed. Tai Chi and Kung Fu being an influence though? Uh, no. There you're stretching things a little far (for one thing, Kung Fu is an overall term, not a specific thing, and can be used to apply to anything, a street sweeper could be said to have good street-sweeping Kung Fu, and Tai Chi came along later).

The myth of Sohei was debunked a few years ago, and Yamabushi was used as a term for again quite a range of groups, ranging from farming Samurai groups, to Shugenja ascetics, to Sennin practitioners, and so on.

Oh, and with regards to your comments on Taijutsu, well, yes. But it should also be remembered that Taijutsu is not an exclusive term to Ninjutsu-related systems (Asayama Ichiden Ryu refer to their unarmed system as Taijutsu, and Sugino Yoshio of the Tenshinsho Den Katori Shinto Ryu refered to his early training in Judo and Aikido as giving him the basis for his studies of the sword, and refered to it as Taijutsu as well). A number of other systems have also used it, or variants of it, over the centuries. But no, I feel that unarmed combat was never the essence of the Ninjutsu-related arts, and that that is just one expression of them. In fact, evidence suggests that systems such as Koto Ryu and Gyokko Ryu had extensive weaponry syllabus', but only the unarmed have survived to be passed down. And if we are going to get technical in the systems that have survived, Togakure Ryu is the most "ninja" of all of the systems, and it is far more focused on escape and armed combat than on unarmed, which is really only a small part of it's teachings. It's far more concerned with avoiding conflict, really.
 

Vulcan

Orange Belt
Joined
Jun 22, 2010
Messages
64
Reaction score
0
[snip] Togakure Ryu is the most "ninja" of all of the systems, and it is far more focused on escape and armed combat than on unarmed, which is really only a small part of it's teachings. It's far more concerned with avoiding conflict, really.



That's awesome. Reflects my mind's eye view.



Glad I didn't spread too many misconceptions with my post.:uhyeah:


Thank you for your teaching.
 
Top