Well THIS is interesting a martial arts for guns!

Deaf Smith

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By Jeffrey Hall

At first glance, the concept of shooting as a “traditional” martial art seems ridiculous. After all, martial arts are steeped in centuries of tradition, mysticism, and superhuman feats of skill; how can shooting a firearm compare with this?

If you consider principles, rather than tools, shooting is clearly a martial art. Stance, balance, focus, execution, and follow-through are the same, whether the hit is from a reverse punch or a pistol. We must master each of these elements of the technique before we can fight effectively.

Jeff Hall a retired Alaska State trooper, former soldier, and NRA instructor, is a life-long shooter and martial artist. He can be contacted at www.hojutsu.com.

Rest of the article can be found here.
 
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ChukaSifu2

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We do something similar in our training circle. I have been a student in Chuka Southern Praying Mantis for 25+ years now, and I have been teaching it for 13+ years. I am ex-military, and had training in light weapons along with prior martial arts training in other styles as well as 18 weapon styles and forms. This being said, some of my military, ex-military and law enforcement students knew of this and wanted to know along with other students of the system of additional training in combat other than the Mantis system. So, I with other instructors, had started a training group where as we would use rifles as staffs, to sweep legs, with bayonet attached as spears as such, rifle slings as Sarongs. Handguns as hooks, kubotans, or just hard focus point objects when striking or too strike with.
It has worked well and grown from some basic disarm techniques to turning the weapons back on the attacker to using the weapons for other than there intended purpose, rifles to clubs, staffs, spears and so on.
At this point it has led to firearm skills training classes.
Long range shooting classes. Close quarters training and others.
But the root of this story has been the kung fu practitioners that started the other weapons training seemed to excel above a student only training in firearms basic courses. Likely because of the prior training in breathing, balance and good stance training.
 
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Deaf Smith

Deaf Smith

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I have no doubt it's true if you train in other weapons, or just H2H, it will help your shooting, especailly defensive shooting where you may move, or your attacker move.

Like I said, interesting!

Deaf
 

Carol

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Very interesting! (Didn't they name a county in Texas after you, Deaf? :) )

I started my martial arts trianing in my 30s and didn't take up marksmanship with a serious interest until after I had been training for about a year. I was surprised at how much my martial arts training helped me with my targeting. Knowing how to establish my body as a good, stable base...having the discipline to slow my heart rate down, it all parlayed in to being a much better shot.

I agree with one of the conclusions...if we had more gun owners or gun users taking a more disciplined approach to the activity, we'd probably have less nutcases out there making the rest of us look bad.
 

Drac

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I agree with one of the conclusions...if we had more gun owners or gun users taking a more disciplined approach to the activity, we'd probably have less nutcases out there making the rest of us look bad.

I could live with that.....
 
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Deaf Smith

Deaf Smith

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Carol,

Did far more than name a county after me!

Deaf Smith was Sam Houston's chief scout. He was in virtually ALL the skirmishes with the Mexican Federal troops except Goliad and the Alamo. Mr. Smith's search party is the one that found Mrs. Dickenson and the other survivors of the Alamo. Mr. Smith's party is also the ones that discovered Santa Anna hiding dressed as a private.

Yes he was hard of hearing, but not deaf. They just called him that. He knew Texas like the back of his hand.

Oh, also the well know sherrif and writer, Skeeter Skelton, or I should say Charles A. Skeeter Skelton who was the sheriff of Deaf Smith county for many a year. He was even born in Deaf Smith County! He served as a city patrolman in Amarillo, Texas, as a U.S. Border Patrolman on the last patrol in Arizona maintained by that agency, as deputy sheriff and then sheriff of his home Deaf Smith County, as a narcotics agent for U.S. Customs, and finally as Special Agent in Charge of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, from which position he retired in 1974.

He was a writer for many a gun rag. And his tales, "Me an Joe" are classics. Tom Sawyer quaility (and they are about his friend, they think Joe Bishop, and himself growing up during the depression.)

His friends included such as Bill Jordan, Charlie Askins, Elmer Keith, and a whole bunch of Texas Rangers.

Now that's a might good name, Deaf Smith, I tell you Carol.

And yes, we could really learn something with a more disiplined approach. Sure wish I had of taken Jeff Coopers courses at Gunsite when I could.

Deaf
 

Andy Moynihan

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Very interesting! (Didn't they name a county in Texas after you, Deaf? :) )

I started my martial arts trianing in my 30s and didn't take up marksmanship with a serious interest until after I had been training for about a year. I was surprised at how much my martial arts training helped me with my targeting. Knowing how to establish my body as a good, stable base...having the discipline to slow my heart rate down, it all parlayed in to being a much better shot.

That and your already being a natural quick study. :)

I agree with one of the conclusions...if we had more gun owners or gun users taking a more disciplined approach to the activity, we'd probably have less nutcases out there making the rest of us look bad.


I too could live with that.
 

Carol

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Carol,

Did far more than name a county after me!

Deaf Smith was Sam Houston's chief scout. He was in virtually ALL the skirmishes with the Mexican Federal troops except Goliad and the Alamo. Mr. Smith's search party is the one that found Mrs. Dickenson and the other survivors of the Alamo. Mr. Smith's party is also the ones that discovered Santa Anna hiding dressed as a private.

Yes he was hard of hearing, but not deaf. They just called him that. He knew Texas like the back of his hand.

Oh, also the well know sherrif and writer, Skeeter Skelton, or I should say Charles A. Skeeter Skelton who was the sheriff of Deaf Smith county for many a year. He was even born in Deaf Smith County! He served as a city patrolman in Amarillo, Texas, as a U.S. Border Patrolman on the last patrol in Arizona maintained by that agency, as deputy sheriff and then sheriff of his home Deaf Smith County, as a narcotics agent for U.S. Customs, and finally as Special Agent in Charge of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, from which position he retired in 1974.

He was a writer for many a gun rag. And his tales, "Me an Joe" are classics. Tom Sawyer quaility (and they are about his friend, they think Joe Bishop, and himself growing up during the depression.)

His friends included such as Bill Jordan, Charlie Askins, Elmer Keith, and a whole bunch of Texas Rangers.

Now that's a might good name, Deaf Smith, I tell you Carol.

And yes, we could really learn something with a more disiplined approach. Sure wish I had of taken Jeff Coopers courses at Gunsite when I could.

Deaf

Wow!

*courtseys to the gentleman*

That is a fine name indeed Deaf, a fine name indeed. You can share my lane at the range anytime ;)
 
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