Training manual?

G

GouRonin

Guest
When I was doing kenpo, a few of the schools I was in did not give their students manuals. Some did. Some encouraged students to make their own training manuals.

What are your opinions? Do you give students manuals to study? Should they make their own? Should it be a mixture of the two?

What have you found to be most effective and why?
:confused:
 
In our class room setting there is only 1 manual. The instructor himself is the only one that owns one. We look at it from time to time if there needs to be a question answered about a move or etc. I'm not quite sure where you can locate an actual kenpo manual. My opinion is that they are a good guide but need some revising to present day time, some things have been changed over the evolution of kenpo that's why I believe they need to be updated. As far as the student goes maybe a small booklet should be put together at each belt level with a breakdown of the techniques they are to learn. This way when their at home practicing (hopefully) they can get the questions answered if there's a problem. I know first hand what it's like practicing at 10 or 11pm with no one to get the right info. to know if your practicing correctly or not. As I've stated before that I was working on one for myself. I find it difficult at times to understand the written versions plus with the new material that is being taught I like to add to the list. I'm in no way going to mass produce the technique list (as it is for myself) besides it could take me years to do. Every seminar I attend I find more info. that I like to place on my list. Hopefully not everyone is rolling their eyes right now but these are my beliefs.
Salute,
Jason Farnsworth
 
Originally posted by jfarnsworth

In our class room setting there is only 1 manual. The instructor himself is the only one that owns one. We look at it from time to time if there needs to be a question answered about a move or etc. I'm not quite sure where you can locate an actual kenpo manual. My opinion is that they are a good guide but need some revising to present day time, some things have been changed over the evolution of kenpo that's why I believe they need to be updated. As far as the student goes maybe a small booklet should be put together at each belt level with a breakdown of the techniques they are to learn. This way when their at home practicing (hopefully) they can get the questions answered if there's a problem. I know first hand what it's like practicing at 10 or 11pm with no one to get the right info. to know if your practicing correctly or not. As I've stated before that I was working on one for myself. I find it difficult at times to understand the written versions plus with the new material that is being taught I like to add to the list. I'm in no way going to mass produce the technique list (as it is for myself) besides it could take me years to do. Every seminar I attend I find more info. that I like to place on my list. Hopefully not everyone is rolling their eyes right now but these are my beliefs.
Salute,
Jason Farnsworth

Dude, come out of the Dark Ages and get some DVD's or videos of the techniques. You can find the written versions of the techniques a few places on the net, why haven't you printed them out yet?

Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde
 
We don't require that our students make their own manuals, but we highly highly recommend it. For me, writing a technique down after I have learned it helps solidify the technique in my head. The writing process forces me to visualize the technique, then I can use that visualization to do mental practice when I'm bored at work.

We don't have an official manual, since we aren't part of an association, and we only have to manage about 13 active blackbelts in our schools. We don't have a "Bible."

Lamont
 
I just started viewing some videos a few weeks ago. At the present time dropping 50 bucks a shot per video isn't possible for me. There are a few others in my house as well that have to come before my martial arts training. As far as just printing out material I've seen on the internet I'd personally feel a little bit like cheating (or stealing) that person out of something. That's just not me. As far as keying my own var. extensions onto the list I have already it helps me remember things better.
Jason Farnsworth
 
I don't think the issue here is how or where to find them but more how do people use them as a resource?
 
we use our respective manuals (we each make our own...some do some don't...from resources on the net) mostly as teaching references. we must also streamline the information in the manuals to fit the schools cirriculum. what i mean is...we have a set way of teaching techniques and forms in the school now because a while back, we were all sort of throwing in our own two sense, each teaching the techniques a little different. now there's absoulutely nothing wrong with that, but when it comes down to beginning and even intermediate students, we found it tends to confuse them. and no matter how hard you try to drill it into someone's head that techniques are just ideas, people would still be asking the same questions over and over about how this person showed us one way and the other person showed us another "which one is right?." thus, at our instructors meetings we cover how everyone in the school will be instructing.


and for personal use...every once and a while you just can't remember a certain technique. i just use it to refresh my memory. i never try to rely on the manuals for my own training very much.
 
Over the past several years I purchased some great tapes on Ebay for reasonable prices. I have a complete library of Mr. Tatums tapes...Outstanding...

All the guys at my school would watch the Tatum self defense tapes and say.... that poor Clyde... and ooh and awh when the thumbing began.. I got a flash back when I saw your post...

Mr. O'briant, Thanks for your Pain, I have gain alot from those tapes
 
When I started training my first instructor had a belt packet and a "dojo sheet" for each belt, the dojo sheet was almost like a checklist for you just as much as your teacher....it was nice to have as a training aid when your getting home at midnight and dont want to bother anyone with a phone call. It was a very good format also because the basics where numbered to the appropriate technique they where demonstrated in. We where also encouraged to take notes in class on our own and notebooks and packets where "subject" to inspection.
I liked it and still do it to this day my opinion is that you develop your brain and the "scholar" much more effectively if it is a tangible process.
 
Originally posted by molson

Over the past several years I purchased some great tapes on Ebay for reasonable prices. I have a complete library of Mr. Tatums tapes...Outstanding...

All the guys at my school would watch the Tatum self defense tapes and say.... that poor Clyde... and ooh and awh when the thumbing began.. I got a flash back when I saw your post...

Mr. O'briant, Thanks for your Pain, I have gain alot from those tapes

You can get a nice glossy 8x10 of clyde getting his head snapped off on Larry Tatums site....Im sure hed autograph it ...I think its pic 1 or 2 cant remember ;)
 
Originally posted by molson

Over the past several years I purchased some great tapes on Ebay for reasonable prices. I have a complete library of Mr. Tatums tapes...Outstanding...


Mr. O'briant, Thanks for your Pain, I have gain alot from those tapes

First, it's Clyde, please.


"All the guys at my school would watch the Tatum self defense tapes and say.... that poor Clyde... and ooh and awh when the thumbing began.. I got a flash back when I saw your post..."


I hear that alot and I'm glad you enjoyed the tapes, they were fun making and I still get publicity out of the deal LOL. There were only a few techniques that really got my attention as Locking Horns comes to mind really quickly. It definitely shows you how the tek is supposed to work in the ideal phase.

Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde
 
Originally posted by GouRonin

When I was doing kenpo, a few of the schools I was in did not give their students manuals. Some did. Some encouraged students to make their own training manuals.

What are your opinions? Do you give students manuals to study? Should they make their own? Should it be a mixture of the two?

What have you found to be most effective and why?
:confused:

I refer my students to an assortment of on-line ,material as well as material they can purchase, both video and written material. I remind them this is ONLY reference material to help refresh their memory on previously learned material. I also point out that because the "techniques" are in reality "training Exersizes" to help in learning a "system" of self defense rather than individual techniques that different instructors and associations may teach each "exersize" slightly differently and still be able to teach the "system". So if the technique used as reference by another source is slightly different than the way it is learned in class... not to worry, you might want to write the technique "as taught in class" as well for an additional source of reference. There is no reference material that can replace live instruction (in my opinion at the beginner level), but all material can add to one's overall base of knowledge.
:asian:
 
Originally posted by jfarnsworth

,,,As far as just printing out material I've seen on the internet I'd personally feel a little bit like cheating (or stealing) that person out of something. That's just not me,,,

The only reason they put their material on the net is to help other people out, so it is not actually stealing. Stealing would be claiming the work as your own. What I do is print it out, maybe type it out in my own words and then I give credit where it's due.
 
Have their own training manuals .......... each specific for their unique organizations. Many are not available unless you belong to each respective organization.

:asian:
 
I have one of the manuals that Mr. Parker Jr. sells on his website. I love it. Its got all the techs written out in great detail, plus space for my own personal notes.

I write my own notes and things to jog my memory in the "notes" space next to the technique.
 
Originally posted by GouRonin

When I was doing kenpo, a few of the schools I was in did not give their students manuals. Some did. Some encouraged students to make their own training manuals.

What are your opinions? Do you give students manuals to study? Should they make their own? Should it be a mixture of the two?

What have you found to be most effective and why?
:confused:

Hey, D. I know you aready know the answer for me but for others:

The Course Book is required study material for each student. They may not participate without one in their posession every session. You must have the Course Book of your current class, and every previous Course Book available during class with your personal notes.

Additionally, in the classroom and on the floor, available on computer to the instructors and students are all of the first level material to black belt. This is to insure consistency of instruction and interpretation of complex material.

The Course Books we use are not available anywhere else and are specifically written for our classes. Older versions of Course 101 are available to persons not in the associated student body. Beyond that is not available and probably would be difficult to understand anyway for anyone not actively studying.
 
Originally posted by GouRonin
I don't think the issue here is how or where to find them but more how do people use them as a resource?


I have found them an invaluable resource. To have record of techniques learned, and even those on the way. Worked very well for me. I don't know about anyone else here, but it really was'nt feasable for me to take any notes in class. Besides blood,sweat, and paper don't really mix ALL that well.

Salute in Christ,
Donald :asian:
 
I have read through different versions of Parker's techniques, but really, I have never written anything down, nor do I consistently bring my written material to class. I remember it because I constantly study it through the physical act of training.

Yes, I think that there are some great historical reasons to write everything down, even put material on video or computer capability (as Clyde O. and Ron C. have mentioned), but really...if you haven't learned it from a physical body, I don't believe you are ever going to really learn it.

Respectfully,

WI, HI
UKS

p.s. for those who live out of reach of good instruction...I empathize with your plight.
 

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