TKD proper kicking techniqoes

AceHBK

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How important is proper kicking techniques in your training? Does this same vphilosophy important to be street effective with your kicking?

How much real wieght is enough when you shift from front to back while proformimg the kicks?

Is proper hip posistion enough or do we need center balance more?

Like to hear everyone view on this.

Hey I am waiting on your instructional video so I can be the 1st to buy it. :)


Very good points mentioned in here..some i have forgotten and need to focus on myself.
 

matt.m

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Gee, Z......you took one of my tricks......lol. Being cut from the same school cloth is not a bad thing my friend.
 

newGuy12

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And you can also practice kicking over something, like a table. Stand next to the table, and kick an object that is on the table with a side kick.

Or for that matter kick the air over the table. In this way, you must chamber the side kick nicely before kicking out. That way, you do not touch the table.
 

Laurentkd

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And you can also practice kicking over something, like a table. Stand next to the table, and kick an object that is on the table with a side kick.

Or for that matter kick the air over the table. In this way, you must chamber the side kick nicely before kicking out. That way, you do not touch the table.


We do this drill at the dojang over chairs. Works well for roundhouse, side kick, spin hook, just about any linear kick really.
 

exile

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I'm trying to work my students up to the following routine:

Get in fighting stance;

Bring rear leg forward onto high chamber position; hold it for 10 seconds;

Rotate chambered leg so the `line' from knee to foot is now parallel to the floor; hold for 10 seconds (call this the secondary chamber);

Snap out roundhouse kick perfectly parallel to floor, return to secondary chamber;

Snap out second roundhouse kick in the same way; return to secondary chamber;

Continue pivot so the balance leg foot is now rotated 180繙 from the original fighting stance direction, bringing kicking leg in secondary chamber along with it; thrust out side kick slowly; keep in fully extended position for 10 seconds;

Return to secondary chamber;

Return to fighting stance by reversing the chambering motions.​

If you can get students to do this exercise a couple of times, you need have no worries about whether they'll be using correct technique when they kick. The trick is getting them to do it slowly enough that they actually feel the sensations associated with correct execution of each phase of the kick. One thing I've noticed about students (in skiing, in MAs, in calligraphy) is that they tend to rush things and not develop `body-sense' of what the motion should feel like. There's a particular physical awareness you have of when you do a technique involving motion correctly; once you've got that nailed down, you can speed the tech up almost any amount and still have good form, because you can feel yourself doing the form correctly, but until you get that sense internalized, you really don't have much of a clue about what it is you're doing. The kind of drill I've described above seems to get people—especially kids, who have the biggest problem with concentrating on technique—to slow down and focus on what it is they should be doing, and get the balance/coordination skills they need to kick in good form.
 

newGuy12

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I had a chance once to spend some time learning from a really good American Kenpo Teacher. He had us do motions at slow speed. He said that this "hard wired" the motion into the brain, so that it was second nature. He said that doing the motions in slow speed was the most efficient way of getting the "hard wiring" done.

I have complete confidence that this Man was correct. He was totally adept at American Kenpo and one of the smartest people I have ever met, so it must be true.
 

IcemanSK

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I learned a drill that I use that helps a lot with chambering & balance. It's called 10-10-20-10 (Like the old phone comercial). I think this is a Bill Wallace drill, although I'm not sure.

2 partners face each other & grip oposite hands (Think a "brother" hand shake). One is the kicker & the other is used for balance. The kicker chambers a leg in roundhouse position & slowly kicks out 10 RH kicks: chambering it back each time without touching the floor. Then another 10 kicks, then 20, then ten. Ideally, the kicker wouldn't drop the leg completely. But only bring it to the "knee up" position in between sets.

It's easier said than done, but it helps with balance & the idea of the chamber.
 
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terryl965

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This is turning out to be a great bit of info.

Here is how we teach a Backleg Roundhouse from the beginner point of view.

We have six steps

Fighting stance

1 Bring knee up to the proper position while turning front foot to 12 o'clock

2 turn hip and rotate the chamber leg even with the floor while turning front foot to 9 o'clock position

3 extend kick though target while turning fron foot to 6 o'clock position

4 re-chamber kick parrallel to floor and turning front foot tback to 9 o'clock

5 bring knee back to position one with front foot in 12o'clock again

6 back to the original fighting position.

Exile you was at the meet and greet when we went over this, hopefully I type well enough to explain the proper kicking techniques.
 

AceHBK

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excellent advice in this thread...

I learned the same way Terry teaches...

As I improved though my teacher put a chair in front of me with the back of the chair facing me to make sure that I each step was done properly. Chair must not have been more than a foot or 2 in front of me. After hurtin yaself on the chair a few times u learn to do it correctly.
 

exile

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This is turning out to be a great bit of info.

Here is how we teach a Backleg Roundhouse from the beginner point of view.

We have six steps

Fighting stance

1 Bring knee up to the proper position while turning front foot to 12 o'clock

2 turn hip and rotate the chamber leg even with the floor while turning front foot to 9 o'clock position

3 extend kick though target while turning fron foot to 6 o'clock position

4 re-chamber kick parrallel to floor and turning front foot tback to 9 o'clock

5 bring knee back to position one with front foot in 12o'clock again

6 back to the original fighting position.

Exile you was at the meet and greet when we went over this, hopefully I type well enough to explain the proper kicking techniques.

Right, Terry, and the point you made at the M&G was that this is the way to train the kick so that both balance and power are at max. The crucial points I remember from your session at the training workshop were that (i) you must be completely balanced on the standing leg, or you have no secure platform to `push off from' in launching the strike with the kicking leg, (ii) you must come in to the target at as close to perpendicular as possible if you want the full force of the strike to go into the target, rather than being split with some going `in' and some going `up', and (iii) the standing foot must be correctly aimed to give the `widest' possible balance platform. This last point is something I'm always trying to pay very close attention to. If your foot is aimed in a somewhat different direction than you're projecting your bodyweight toward in the kick, you're going to be at a balance disadvantage no matter what&#8212;because your foot isn't placed properly to counteract the movement of your bodyweight in that direction and reestablish your equiliibrium at that point. But if your foot is correctly positioned, then no matter how far off your vertical axis you project your weight, your foot can push back with the proper amount of force, in the correct plane, to stabilize you. So the `clock position' of the long axis of your foot is all-important in maintaining your balance dynamically and helping damp down the small shifts in where your bodyweight is going that can destabilize you...

I'll say this: careful detailed attention to the fine-grained mechanics of delivering effective kicks is probably one of the sure diagnostics for separating a McDojang from a serious, high-quality MA school...
 

foot2face

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I'm trying to work my students up to the following routine:
Get in fighting stance;
Bring rear leg forward onto high chamber position; hold it for 10 seconds;
Rotate chambered leg so the `line' from knee to foot is now parallel to the floor; hold for 10 seconds (call this the secondary chamber);
Snap out roundhouse kick perfectly parallel to floor, return to secondary chamber;
Snap out second roundhouse kick in the same way; return to secondary chamber;
Continue pivot so the balance leg foot is now rotated 180繙 from the original fighting stance direction, bringing kicking leg in secondary chamber along with it; thrust out side kick slowly; keep in fully extended position for 10 seconds;
Return to secondary chamber;
Return to fighting stance by reversing the chambering motions.
Slow static exercises such as this are an excellent method for teaching the proper technique for each kick, emphasizing fundamental movement, but they should be combined with similar dynamic drills. Even someone with seemingly perfect technique suffers from degradation due to speed and its at speed were these kicks count. I liken it to when I learned how to play guitar. When I would begin studying a new scale or a particularly difficult lick, I grabbed my metronome and dial it way down focusing on playing each note and executing every technique cleanly. Once I had flawless execution at a slow tempo I would gradually dial up the metronome, increasing the speed until I was able to play the piece very quickly without flaw.

One thing I've noticed about students (in skiing, in MAs, in calligraphy) is that they tend to rush things and not develop `body-sense' of what the motion should feel like. There's a particular physical awareness you have of when you do a technique involving motion correctly; once you've got that nailed down, you can speed the tech up almost any amount and still have good form, because you can feel yourself doing the form correctly, but until you get that sense internalized, you really don't have much of a clue about what it is you're doing.
I completely agree with you that inexperienced practitioners tend to rush and not develop body-sense, that particular physical awareness that you speak of which I believe is essential for excellent technique and effortless, fluid movement. I do, however, disagree with your assertion that once you've got that nailed down, you can speed the tech up almost any amount and still have good form. Ive seen too many people with otherwise perfect form break under pressure and loose so much technique when they try to perform it quickly. Being able to perform a technique slowly with ideal form does not instantly translate into fast execution. One needs to practice specific drills that emphasize proper form at full speed, but not before they develop correct technique and have acquired body-sense by practicing exercises like you have recommended.
 

DArnold

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How important is proper kicking techniques in your training? Does this same vphilosophy important to be street effective with your kicking?
How much real wieght is enough when you shift from front to back while proformimg the kicks?
Is proper hip posistion enough or do we need center balance more?
Like to hear everyone view on this.

Proper kicking techniques is paramount to kicking. However, to look at your question it implys that people train not to be affective. Unusual concept! I was taught that there is no difference between the way you practice in class and what you do on the street. If you do your wasting your time!

The old saying has always held true:

Practice makes perfect or...
Practice crap, perfect crap.

As for weight shifting there is no absolute to this question. It would be dependent on many variables: Stance, target, purpose, intent...
(For example, if I am in an L stance there is no weight shift as my weight is on the back leg. But if the target is farther distance I may need to shift my weight foreward for distance...)

Is proper hip posistion enough or do we need center balance more?

Depends, I rember working with Bill Wallace and he only used his right leg when he was 100% sure he would make contact. (Because of a bad knee - NEVER go outside of your range!) on the other hand he taught me how to use a speed bag with my feet!

Four points,
  1. My instructor taught me proper joint position and hip rotation for power, and after 29 years I have never had joint problems (Unlike many Japanese styles that work against the joints)
  2. I once watched a 1st Dan do a turning kick wrong (Did not piviot all the way over on the supporting foot) She produced so much power (torque), that she broke her own supporting ankle. So I know proper technique is important if you plan on doing this when you get old. However, many of us rember when we were 18 and bullet proof.
  3. As my instuctor taught me: A bad kick will hurt you!
  4. Many juniors ask qustions looking for one right answer, like:
  • Should I lean when kicking
  • Should I kick fast or slow
  • How much hip should I use
Much as you may ask what the tempo of a song is? As you learn more, these are all just variables that can be changed, depending on what you want to do/accomplish.

CHEERS,
 
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