kicks..... from wikipedia

Manny

Senior Master
Joined
Apr 30, 2007
Messages
2,563
Reaction score
125
Location
Veracruz,Mexico
The following is from wikipedia... just for the record.......

Manny.

Practicality of kicks

The usefulness of kicks in self-defense and actual combat has been debated. Some, like Bruce Lee, have commented that the leg, thanks to its size and weight, is a more powerful weapon than the arm. Because the leg is longer than the arm, kicks tend to keep an opponent at a distance and to surprise him or her with their range. Many have reported successfully using kicks in real-life self-defense situations, intended primarily for self-defense and combat, have incorporated kicks. On the other hand, the high kicks practiced in modern martial arts or the flying/jumping kicks performed in synthesis styles are primarily performed for conditioning or aesthetic reasons. The proponents has viewed that some high front snap kicks are effective for striking the face or throat, particularly against charging opponents, and flying kicks can be effective to scare off attackers. Some contrasting views have stated that high kicks are completely ineffective as it would be much quicker and more probable to be able to strike the throat, nose or face with a palm strike for the face or a claw hand to strike at or choke the throat. It has been noted that high kicks (and other complicated kicks for that matter) can be almost impossible to perform in an actual confrontation due to the adrenal shock that one experiences in a stressful situation. This "adrenal dump" as it is called by some experts, causes the body to lose the ability of fine motor control, which is what many modern high kicks require to perform. Compromised balance is another concern with high kicks. Additionally, high kicks nearly always expose the groin, inviting a swift kick to the area from an agile opponent. As a result, the use of high kicks in defensive situations is considered risky at best for anyone but highly skilled martial artists. It should be further noted, that many styles use a more vulnerable stance (circular stance) that exposes the groin constantly (as noted by Bruce Lee for example in his defense manuals) since attacks to the groin are no longer a concern in most martial arts. Linear stance such as in Shotokan Karate, Wado Karate and most other original forms of Karate and Te fighting do not expose the groin. Taekwondo, Jeet Kune Do, and Shotokan Karate share nearly identical stances in terms of the initial attack and even after basic attacks(roundhouse, front kick, etc.).
The general consensus is that for most defense and combat applications, simple kicks aimed at vulnerable targets below the chest (self defence experts such as author and teacher Marc Macyoung claim that kicks should be aimed no higher than the waist/stomach) may be highly efficient, but should be executed with a degree of care. Thus, the fighter should not compromise their balance while delivering a kick, and retract the leg properly to avoid grappling. The front kick could be aimed at the groin/pelvis area when attacking, or to the waist/stomach area when being used defensively, knees and shins, inflicting respectable damage. The defensive side kick is a great move for stopping a blitzing opponent. The roundhouse kick performed at low level may be effective due to its power, and the vulnerability of many of its targets ( knees, ribs etc.) since attacking leg muscles will often cripple opponent's mobility, however the technique still throws a fighter's balance off and leaves them vulnerable. It is often recommended to build and drill simple combinations that involve attacking different levels of opponents. A common example would be distracting an opponent's focus via a fake jab, following up with a powerful attack at the opponent's legs and punching. Further, since low kicks are inherently quicker and harder to see and dodge in general they are often emphasized in a street fight scenario by Karate, Taekwondo, and Muay Thai practitioners.
[edit]
 

d1jinx

Master Black Belt
Joined
Jun 13, 2009
Messages
1,390
Reaction score
17
Location
all-ova
where I'm from, Kicks are shoes.....
icon10.gif
 

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
14,720
Reaction score
2,814
Location
Michigan
Isshin-Ryu teaches kicks no higher than the obi. I am personally rather fond of them.
 
OP
Manny

Manny

Senior Master
Joined
Apr 30, 2007
Messages
2,563
Reaction score
125
Location
Veracruz,Mexico
Isshin-Ryu teaches kicks no higher than the obi. I am personally rather fond of them.

When practicing one steps or ho shi sul I like to kick low and belive it's quite efective, there is one step sparring where I kick directly the bladder and believe me is quite efective so then use a cup of greace in a bend oponent. Also to break a double wrist grasp I use a groing kick to ease the grip and break loose from a strong person.

I think Isshin-Ryu must have a good arsenal of low kicks I would like to see some of them.

Manny
 

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
14,720
Reaction score
2,814
Location
Michigan
When practicing one steps or ho shi sul I like to kick low and belive it's quite efective, there is one step sparring where I kick directly the bladder and believe me is quite efective so then use a cup of greace in a bend oponent. Also to break a double wrist grasp I use a groing kick to ease the grip and break loose from a strong person.

I think Isshin-Ryu must have a good arsenal of low kicks I would like to see some of them.

Manny

Basically, there are just a few kicks in the entire system, but they are used in many imaginative ways as 'bunkai' in the various kata. In fact, it's so amazing to me as I progress through the system to find how many kicks there actually are 'hidden' in the kata.

But the basic kicks are these:

http://www.southfieldmartialarts.com/html/Kicks.html

Isshin-Ryu kicks are characterized by being generally chambered kicks. That is, we draw the leg up to the buttocks, 'cocking' it before delivering the kick and returning to the same position before returning the foot to the floor. We deliver the kicks, as noted, to the obi (belt) or lower.

Here is a video that shows the 'lower body exercises' that encompass the kicks, but not how they are delivered in self-defense situations or inside the kata or bunkai for the kata:

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Rumy73

Black Belt
Joined
Jan 25, 2011
Messages
588
Reaction score
10
Location
Washington, DC
In self defense, the answer depends on the situation. A wise person knows that every one of his actions creates opportunities and exposes him/her to threats. Surviving an assault is a process that requires split second decisions. Only through training, we can hope to be even half prepared (as most training isn't really like real life -- argue all you want, it isn't). Kicking low is a safe bet and can cause enough damage for someone to escape an attack. Kicking high may deliver a crushing blow, but it also leaves a person vulnerable to counter attack or falling. Herein, we must separate martials arts as a sport and as a self defense method. What works in one setting is not always the best choice in another. A good teacher should emphasize this to his/her students.
 
Top