Think lighter...?

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Mou Meng Gung Fu

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When I was younger, I saw a Shaolin fighting monk do something I never thought possible. From a complete standstill, he took one step and then lept on top of the roof of a building. The rooftop was about 10-feet-high. The monk I witnessed couldn't be more than 5'5" tall and he wasn't wearing any wires but yet it still looked like something from out of a wuxia film. When I asked him how he was able to leap like that, he simply smiled and said "Think lighter." For years I have pondered what he was saying, but I've never been able to jump 10-feet in the air up on top of a roof. The highest I've ever kicked was 7-feet in the air. How did he get his entire body to do that? Has anyone else ever experienced seeing or doing something like this? If so, could you explain how to do this in layman's terms? Thank you. :)
 

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Mou Meng Gung Fu

Mou Meng Gung Fu

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轻功。if you can read Chinese you can learn how to do it.

Qing Gõng?

Qing meaning something akin to light, soft, easy, simple, or less in number. Gõng meaning skill, work, achievment, etc. So basically what you just said is "soft training" or something to that effect. Could you explain what you mean by that (in layman terms)?
 
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Mou Meng Gung Fu

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"Javier Sotomayor (Cuba) is the current men's record holder with a jump of 2.45 m (8 ft 0 1⁄4 in) set in 1993"

So there is that small snag in the story...

That's an amazing feat. However, it presents no snag in my story. I like how immediately minds are closed to what I'm saying. That's cool though, my mind was closed too at one time. But not everyone on the planet is recorded in history books. I know what I saw, and I wasn't on drugs. Oaktree just said that if you can understand Chinese then you can do it. I highly doubt that reading Chinese will help, though. Oaktree appears to be fluent in Chinese, but has yet to demonstrate this high jumping ability. I understand a little bit, but I'm not fluent in Chinese and I myselfcan not jump that high. There are people in this world that nobody ever hears about who can do things which seem superhuman. But you must try to keep an open mind. It is possible because I have seen it. I have never lied about anything since I joined this forum, so why would I lie now? That wouldn't make any sense. Skepticism and criticism is perfectly fine. But I know what I witnessed. Chances are I'm not the only one in the world with this knowledge, either, since it is real. Other people must have witnessed it too, and perhaps someone out there even knows how its done. In meantime, I'll leave this thread open to discussion and opinion.
 

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Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. As noted, the current world record, set by someone whose goal is to jump high, working hard at it, is less than 10 feet. I might buy claiming that the monk ran up the wall in a couple of steps. Claiming that he effortlessly leaped almost twice his height? I'm more than slightly skeptical. What was his name? Where did you see this happen? If such a feat is available -- why wouldn't it be regularly featured in the traveling monk shows?
 
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Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. As noted, the current world record, set by someone whose goal is to jump high, working hard at it, is less than 10 feet. I might buy claiming that the monk ran up the wall in a couple of steps. Claiming that he effortlessly leaped almost twice his height? I'm more than slightly skeptical. What was his name? Where did you see this happen? If such a feat is available -- why wouldn't it be regularly featured in the traveling monk shows?

I can not say for certain that he did not run up the wall. But from where I was standing, it most certainly did not look like he ran up the wall. He was wearing brown and grey robes with a bright yellow belt, not the stereotypical bright orange and black robes associated with the other Shaolin monks. He was wearing brown trousers and had a shaved head like most of the other Buddhist monks I've seen. He didn't have any dots on his head. He did have a tattoo of a turtle on his right hand, though. I couldn't tell you his name because I'm not good at Chinese, but in English his name sounded to me like "Shi Zheng" or "Xie Xiang" or something similar (with the sh- prefix and -ng suffix). He was probably in his late-40's or early-50's, with yellow sun-bronzed skin and a silvery white hairline. Besides leaping on to a rooftop in China, he also balanced a bo-staff vertically off the ground with his entire body positioned at a 90° right-angle at the top of the bo-staff. He also balanced a wooden bowl above his head while juggling five flaming pebbles of various sizes with his bare hands. I know it sounds impossible to most people, but I witnessed all of these events first-hand in person during my trip to China in 2006.

I will try to provide evidence once I find it. I have a lot of things in storage right now, as there's just not enough room at my house for everything. I have years of unorganized paperwork, old photographs, and junk from when I was younger. I just have to find time and the motivation to get around to it. It's literally going to take a while. I apologize for any delay.
 

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When I was younger, I saw a Shaolin fighting monk do something I never thought possible. From a complete standstill, he took one step and then lept on top of the roof of a building. The rooftop was about 10-feet-high. The monk I witnessed couldn't be more than 5'5" tall and he wasn't wearing any wires but yet it still looked like something from out of a wuxia film. When I asked him how he was able to leap like that, he simply smiled and said "Think lighter." For years I have pondered what he was saying, but I've never been able to jump 10-feet in the air up on top of a roof. The highest I've ever kicked was 7-feet in the air. How did he get his entire body to do that? Has anyone else ever experienced seeing or doing something like this? If so, could you explain how to do this in layman's terms? Thank you. :)
Yeah I've seen that to...it was a damm good movie
 

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Qing Gõng?

Qing meaning something akin to light, soft, easy, simple, or less in number. Gõng meaning skill, work, achievment, etc. So basically what you just said is "soft training" or something to that effect. Could you explain what you mean by that (in layman terms)?
Google it.
 

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That's an amazing feat. However, it presents no snag in my story. I like how immediately minds are closed to what I'm saying. That's cool though, my mind was closed too at one time. But not everyone on the planet is recorded in history books. I know what I saw, and I wasn't on drugs. Oaktree just said that if you can understand Chinese then you can do it. I highly doubt that reading Chinese will help, though. Oaktree appears to be fluent in Chinese, but has yet to demonstrate this high jumping ability. I understand a little bit, but I'm not fluent in Chinese and I myselfcan not jump that high. There are people in this world that nobody ever hears about who can do things which seem superhuman. But you must try to keep an open mind. It is possible because I have seen it. I have never lied about anything since I joined this forum, so why would I lie now? That wouldn't make any sense. Skepticism and criticism is perfectly fine. But I know what I witnessed. Chances are I'm not the only one in the world with this knowledge, either, since it is real. Other people must have witnessed it too, and perhaps someone out there even knows how its done. In meantime, I'll leave this thread open to discussion and opinion.
I am not interested in Qinggong though I have books in Chinese. The monk did it you saw it you asked how he could do it I said Qinggong, the monk even told you how in English.
If you understood what Qinggong was and could read Chinese then you would know how it is done. It is a special skill developed through special training nothing mystical about it.

Things are not as extraordinary as they appear to be.
 

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They are springy little buggers.


 
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I can not say for certain that he did not run up the wall.
If you weren't in a position to see for sure whether he "ran up" the wall, then you weren't in a position to tell exactly what he was doing, the exact height of the roof, and so on. From your description of the rest of his demonstration, he wasn't a monk, he was a street performer dressed as a monk - doing an act combining acrobatics, juggling, and stage (street) magic. Just because you couldn't tell how the magic trick was performed doesn't mean it was real.

"Javier Sotomayor (Cuba) is the current men's record holder with a jump of 2.45 m (8 ft 0 1⁄4 in) set in 1993"

So there is that small snag in the story...

Sotomayor's record was for the high jump event where the athlete runs up and clears his body over a bar. MMGF describes something closer to a standing high jump. The current world record for that is 1.9 m/ (6 feet 2 & 3/4 inches).
 

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He did have a tattoo of a turtle on his right hand, though
oh well see now we know......it was the tattoo. the tattoo is done by a Himalayan shaman. if you want to jump high you need to get a turtle tatoo by the Himalayan shaman
 

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I can not say for certain that he did not run up the wall. But from where I was standing, it most certainly did not look like he ran up the wall. He was wearing brown and grey robes with a bright yellow belt, not the stereotypical bright orange and black robes associated with the other Shaolin monks. He was wearing brown trousers and had a shaved head like most of the other Buddhist monks I've seen. He didn't have any dots on his head. He did have a tattoo of a turtle on his right hand, though. I couldn't tell you his name because I'm not good at Chinese, but in English his name sounded to me like "Shi Zheng" or "Xie Xiang" or something similar (with the sh- prefix and -ng suffix). He was probably in his late-40's or early-50's, with yellow sun-bronzed skin and a silvery white hairline. Besides leaping on to a rooftop in China, he also balanced a bo-staff vertically off the ground with his entire body positioned at a 90° right-angle at the top of the bo-staff. He also balanced a wooden bowl above his head while juggling five flaming pebbles of various sizes with his bare hands. I know it sounds impossible to most people, but I witnessed all of these events first-hand in person during my trip to China in 2006.

I will try to provide evidence once I find it. I have a lot of things in storage right now, as there's just not enough room at my house for everything. I have years of unorganized paperwork, old photographs, and junk from when I was younger. I just have to find time and the motivation to get around to it. It's literally going to take a while. I apologize for any delay.

He does not have a name.

He is a Tibetan monk that fulfilled the prophecies made of him (fighting for justice while cranes circled overhead, fighting for love under a palace of jade, and rescuing friends he never met with family he never knew he had) which include forgoing his name. He was then entrusted by his master with the protection of a Scroll which contains knowledge by which the reader becomes the most powerful of living things, a protection that keeps him youthful and immunize him to injury until, at the close of 60 years, he must pass the knowledge to an heir.
 

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"Shaolin fighting monk"
Hmm...

"he took one step and then lept on top of the roof of a building. The rooftop was about 10-feet-high."
He leapt 'up' to a rooftop about 10 feet above where he was standing? He, unassisted using only his one step, leapt straight up to a 10 foot rooftop? This means he would have had to get his body and feet higher than 10 feet from his standing point in order to land and maintain his balance. Sorry but I strongly question the validity of that physical feat.
 

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He does not have a name.

He is a Tibetan monk that fulfilled the prophecies made of him (fighting for justice while cranes circled overhead, fighting for love under a palace of jade, and rescuing friends he never met with family he never knew he had) which include forgoing his name. He was then entrusted by his master with the protection of a Scroll which contains knowledge by which the reader becomes the most powerful of living things, a protection that keeps him youthful and immunize him to injury until, at the close of 60 years, he must pass the knowledge to an heir.
And passed the tradition to the guy who coined the term milf.
 
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