The Influence of Kenpo On Modern Arnis

DrBarber

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DrBarber said:
Edited and deleted a portion of original post:

My instructor, Sifu Don Zanghi, mixed Tracy System Kenpo and Modern Arnis from white through black belt, with the expressed acknowledgement and encouragement of both Professor and GM Al Tracy. ...I can attest to the effectiness of Tracy Kenpo techniques and principles of motion when blended into Modern Arnis.

People should also consider the significance of the American Modern Arnis video clips as produced by Sifu/Guro Tom Bolden. Sifu Tom was trained in CHA-3 Kenpo and Pancipanci Eskrima in Hawaii during the 1960's and 70's before he met Professor. When you watch his videos, there is little doubt as the effectiveness of blending Kenpo (Kajukenbo) and Modern Arnis. Speed, power and precision are the hallmarks of the AMAA program. There is no doubt in my mind regarding Kenpo as an influence on Professor and in Modern Arnis.

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I dug up some of my old training notes from Sifu Don Zanghi and he also mailed me an old IMAF newsletter from 1986 so I can add some material about the Kenpo Connection to Modern Arnis. Some of the Kenpo trained people who were very actively involved with Professor Presas during the middle to late 1980's were Fred King, Joe Breidenstein, Dennis Toston, Barbara Bones, Janesa Kruse, Lee Lowery, Jim Clapp, Judy Clapp, Bodden Sween, Joe Foster, Tom Bolden, Rick Mitchell and Don Zanghi.

I have deliberately omitted John Bryant from the above list because even though he was trained in Tracy Kenpo under Sifu Don Zanghi, he chose to omit any and all Kenpo techniques from his Modern Arnis program at the Filipino Martial Arts Academy, in Amherst NY. Since we both trained under the same instructor, Don Zanghi, and I retained plus added more Kenpo in the form of advanced Tracy through the Sandan level with some CHA-3 Kenpo from PG Tom Bolden, my Modern Arnis has some significant differences from what one would experience from Dave Smith, Tammy Wilson and Tim Hartman, all of whom were students of John.

A significant comment is in order here because if one reviews the orignal 5 video tapes made by Professor in 1984 & 1985, the primary assistants are Jim Clapp, Judy Clapp and Lee Lowery. And all are Kenpo trained black belts prior to meeting Professor. The dye is clearly cast and the picture is quite clear, Modern Arnis and Kenpo are connected.

A couple of pieces of information that some of you will find interesting are as follows: in 1986 there were 9 underbelts in Modern Arnis and the gradings ranged from Antas Isa to Lakan. That's right, Lakan is an underbelt, part of the "rainbow". Since the newsletter is an official IMAF publication, it has to be considered as an accurate reflection of Professor's thinking at that point in time. This piece of information gives the contention by some folks that the "Lakan" grading is akin to being a probationary title some serious support.

However, in my opinion, "Lakan" Is Not the first level of the black belt rankings, it is last grade of the underbelt rankings and has no other value. The black belt sequence begins with a seperation in the ranking column from the underbelt titles and has a seperate heading with the titles Lakan Isa, Lakan Dalawa, Lakan Tat-lo and Lakan A-pat. There only the four ranks listed in the 1986 document. One can assume that the highest ranked USA Modern Arnis person would hold the rank of Lakan A-pat. However there is no statement as to who that might be.

I also noticed that there was a reference to Dan Anderson as an IMAF Senior Instructor. Gad zooks, a documented reference to Dan as a long time IMAF member and senior instructor, so some of the guff about Dan being a "Johnnie-come-lately" to the art is without merit.

If anyone would like to have a copy of the newsletter, send me your s-mail address and I will forward you a copy.

Jerome Barber, Ed.D.

Independent Escrima-Kenpo-Arnis



 

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DrBarber said:
I dug up some of my old training notes from Sifu Don Zanghi and he also mailed me an old IMAF newsletter from 1986 so I can add some material about the Kenpo Connection to Modern Arnis. Some of the Kenpo trained people who were very actively involved with Professor Presas during the middle to late 1980's were Fred King, Joe Breidenstein, Dennis Toston, Barbara Bones, Janesa Kruse, Lee Lowery, Jim Clapp, Judy Clapp, Bodden Sween, Joe Foster, Tom Bolden, Rick Mitchell and Don Zanghi.

I have deliberately omitted John Bryant from the above list because even though he was trained in Tracy Kenpo under Sifu Don Zanghi, he chose to omit any and all Kenpo techniques from his Modern Arnis program at the Filipino Martial Arts Academy, in Amherst NY. Since we both trained under the same instructor, Don Zanghi, and I retained plus added more Kenpo in the form of advanced Tracy through the Sandan level with some CHA-3 Kenpo from PG Tom Bolden, my Modern Arnis has some significant differences from what one would experience from Dave Smith, Tammy Wilson and Tim Hartman, all of whom were students of John.

A significant comment is in order here because if one reviews the orignal 5 video tapes made by Professor in 1984 & 1985, the primary assistants are Jim Clapp, Judy Clapp and Lee Lowery. And all are Kenpo trained black belts prior to meeting Professor. The dye is clearly cast and the picture is quite clear, Modern Arnis and Kenpo are connected.

A couple of pieces of information that some of you will find interesting are as follows: in 1986 there were 9 underbelts in Modern Arnis and the gradings ranged from Antas Isa to Lakan. That's right, Lakan is an underbelt, part of the "rainbow". Since the newsletter is an official IMAF publication, it has to be considered as an accurate reflection of Professor's thinking at that point in time. This piece of information gives the contention by some folks that the "Lakan" grading is akin to being a probationary title some serious support.

However, in my opinion, "Lakan" Is Not the first level of the black belt rankings, it is last grade of the underbelt rankings and has no other value. The black belt sequence begins with a seperation in the ranking column from the underbelt titles and has a seperate heading with the titles Lakan Isa, Lakan Dalawa, Lakan Tat-lo and Lakan A-pat. There only the four ranks listed in the 1986 document. One can assume that the highest ranked USA Modern Arnis person would hold the rank of Lakan A-pat. However there is no statement as to who that might be.

I also noticed that there was a reference to Dan Anderson as an IMAF Senior Instructor. Gad zooks, a documented reference to Dan as a long time IMAF member and senior instructor, so some of the guff about Dan being a "Johnnie-come-lately" to the art is without merit.

If anyone would like to have a copy of the newsletter, send me your s-mail address and I will forward you a copy.

Jerome Barber, Ed.D.

Independent Escrima-Kenpo-Arnis





The Lakan Ranking has been discussed by a lot here over the years.

The General concensus is that it was a mistake taken from a list for the Michigan Summer Camps. The first was 1987, and the source for the material was a book, where it read Lakan at the top of the list then Isa, Delawa, etcetera underneath. So, having a flyer form before, is good to know. This means that Terry W. was not the only one to misunderstand.

I have a booklet from "Arnolds Martial Arts". The person who gave it to me told me he got it in 1977.

The first page has Acknowledgements:
Acknowledgments - Love - Peace

TO:

Remy Amador Presas - Founder of Modern Arnis.

Choi Hong Hi - Founder of Tae Kwon Do.

James M. Mitose - For his gift of True Self-Defense to man kind.

Bruce Juchnick - For his Sharing of his Kenpo with me so Freely.

My Students - For there undying loyalty to my teaching's and training.

So I see here, and from your post, that many of those who did Kenpo in one form or anther trained with GM Remy Presas. What was the influence back to him if any? As mentioned the forms tapes and Jim and Judy Clapp have a kenpo flavor when executed by them, but not by The Professor.

As to the tapes in general, I know form talking with many of those who were training as black belts then, that those in Michigan, such as Rocky P, Jeff Fields, Jeff Owens, Jim Power, and Joe Dorris, were all expected to travel to do the tapes. Yet for some reason at the last minute, they were not called to go down, and the tapes were made without some of them. So, I would not place the importance of who as in the tapes, as I believe it was more of who was at hand when the Professor was ready to tape.


Back to the handout from Arnold's, the Martial Arts Ranks are as follows:
Yellow
Green I
Green II
Blue I
Blue II
Red I
Red II
Black Belt (* All those promoted at the time were Lakan Isa's no one got the Lakan rank until the Mid 80's time frame. *)

Note: Only 7 colored ranks. Even the Pink Book has from the PI 6 whites and 3 browns, for nine ranks to map up with the predominate Korean and Japanese arts.

If you will notice this looks a lot like Tae Kwon Do, which the rest of the booklet discusses as well.
Yellow Stripe
Yellow
Green Stripe
Green
Blue Stripe
Blue
Red Stripe
Red
Black Stripe
Black Belt


On a side note: These requirements I have only mention the Cane (anyos) forms and nothing is said about empty hand at all.

This correlates with the Pink book so it seems that as time progressed and people wanted more of what they were used too, The Professor, gave them the empty hand forms from Shoto-kan. (* Which we have had a few Shoto-kan people train with us, and they swear the forms are almost the same patterns. Maybe a different turn here or there just enough to be different. *)
 

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I believe that this is where the Art Within Your Art is evident. Most of the Kempo people that I am familiar with that cross train in Modern Arnis have added Modern Arnis techniques to their training. I do not see it going the other way. Professor would rarely finish off a Modern Arnis technique with kicks and punches. He showed you how to execute the strike, lock or trap and left finishing off the opponent to the individual and their preferred style. In this way, Professor's Modern Arnis did not exclude what you already knew from your primary art.

Sal
 
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DrBarber

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Rich Parsons said:
The Lakan Ranking has been discussed by a lot here over the years.

The General concensus is that it was a mistake taken from a list for the Michigan Summer Camps. The first was 1987, and the source for the material was a book, where it read Lakan at the top of the list then Isa, Delawa, etcetera underneath. So, having a flyer form before, is good to know. This means that Terry W. was not the only one to misunderstand.

I have a booklet from "Arnolds Martial Arts". The person who gave it to me told me he got it in 1977.

The first page has Acknowledgements:


So I see here, and from your post, that many of those who did Kenpo in one form or anther trained with GM Remy Presas. What was the influence back to him if any? As mentioned the forms tapes and Jim and Judy Clapp have a kenpo flavor when executed by them, but not by The Professor.

As to the tapes in general, I know form talking with many of those who were training as black belts then, that those in Michigan, such as Rocky P, Jeff Fields, Jeff Owens, Jim Power, and Joe Dorris, were all expected to travel to do the tapes. Yet for some reason at the last minute, they were not called to go down, and the tapes were made without some of them. So, I would not place the importance of who as in the tapes, as I believe it was more of who was at hand when the Professor was ready to tape.


Back to the handout from Arnold's, the Martial Arts Ranks are as follows:
Yellow
Green I
Green II
Blue I
Blue II
Red I
Red II
Black Belt (* All those promoted at the time were Lakan Isa's no one got the Lakan rank until the Mid 80's time frame. *)

Note: Only 7 colored ranks. Even the Pink Book has from the PI 6 whites and 3 browns, for nine ranks to map up with the predominate Korean and Japanese arts.

If you will notice this looks a lot like Tae Kwon Do, which the rest of the booklet discusses as well.
Yellow Stripe
Yellow
Green Stripe
Green
Blue Stripe
Blue
Red Stripe
Red
Black Stripe
Black Belt


On a side note: These requirements I have only mention the Cane (anyos) forms and nothing is said about empty hand at all.

This correlates with the Pink book so it seems that as time progressed and people wanted more of what they were used too, The Professor, gave them the empty hand forms from Shoto-kan. (* Which we have had a few Shoto-kan people train with us, and they swear the forms are almost the same patterns. Maybe a different turn here or there just enough to be different. *)
Hi Rich,

You have a very nice find in the Arnold book. I didn't know that it existed, but I also take heart in knowing that there is another publication out there that adds a bit more information to the larger perspective that already exists.

The empty hand forms are definately Shotokan. The direct influence of Kenpo/Kajukenbo was that these folks were used to forms and wanted to have some for practice purposes in terms of their Modern Arnis studies... or so I was told by Sifu Zanghi and recoded this idea in my notes dated in 1983.
Perhaps the most significant influence on Modern Arnis from the Kenpo
/Kajukenbo groups was that they were the involved in the inital formation/structuring of the US version of the IMAF. These folks dominated the IMAF leadership positions in the mid 1980's. The Parker, Tracy and Kajukenbo players were also among the Professor's leading exponents of the art of Modern Arnis. When talking about the Kenpo influences on Modern Arnis, it is not necessary for there to be a profound difference in what Professor did in terms of physical techniques, although that is what most people would want to see detailed. In this case the influences were most profound in hosting Professor at seminars, making networking links to other instructors for seminars, camps and introducing the art into new schools as well as establishing the intial IMAF/US organizational structure. These influences are far more important than whether or not Professor actaully adapted some Kenpo technique and added it to Modern Arnis. Without the Kenpo/Kajukenbo connections it would have been much harder for Professor to grow the art in the US and Canada.

The fact that Kajukenbo, Parker Kenpo and Tracy Kenpo are Hawaiian based systems in which there was already a blending of Chinese, Japanese, Samoan and Filipino martial arts, made the transition to Modern Arnis by these people so much more natural than for some other karate based systems such as Shotokan, Isshin Ryu and Shorin Ryu. The fact that Professor could study Shotokan and blend it into the Filipino based arts is a testiment to his individual skills. However, please note that even he could not and did not "round off" the linear movements of the anyos from their original karate format.

Since the orginal question deals with what is Modern Arnis, the inclusion of Kenpo/Kajukenbo influences can not be ignored or minimized simply because Professor himself did not mimmic or adopt some movements out of these arts.

Jerome Barber, Ed.D.
 

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DrBarber said:
The fact that Professor could study Shotokan and blend it into the Filipino based arts is a testiment to his individual skills. However, please note that even he could not and did not "round off" the linear movements of the anyos from their original karate format.
Though I never had the opportunity to meet or train with the late Professor, I do find the above difficult to believe.

There seems to be a lot of talk of "empty hand" anyos and "cane anyos". There's a difference? I have learned 3 anyos, and they are done with either one cane, 2 canes, empty hand, with one blade, 2 blades, cane and blade, or with the sibat. The "form" of the anyos is the same throughout. When I do the anyos emptyhanded, the movements are "rounded" and flowing. There is no "karate" influence in them, and these are the only forms that I have ever learned. These anyos were taught to me by my instructor, who learned them directly from Datu Kelly Worden. The only time I have seen Datu do them is on tape, and his interpretation of them does not seem to be karate influenced.

Now, having said that, I can easily adapt the movements to take on more of a JKD flavour, and demonstrate the linear trapping applications within them. This works really nicely with the blade in a reverse grip.

Since the orginal question deals with what is Modern Arnis, the inclusion of Kenpo/Kajukenbo influences can not be ignored or minimized simply because Professor himself did not mimmic or adopt some movements out of these arts.
This is a peculiar statement. Who developed and codified this art? I don't think we can appeal to a higher authority on Modern Arnis than the Professor, can we? I think the question is, did Modern Arnis exist as a firm concept before Professor began teaching outside of the Phillipines? I believe that it probably did. With that in mind, is it correct to say that Kenpo exits within Modern Arnis, or that Modern Arnis exists within Kenpo? I can say this much: there is no Kenpo in my Modern Arnis.

Cebu West said:
I believe that this is where the Art Within Your Art is evident. Most of the Kempo people that I am familiar with that cross train in Modern Arnis have added Modern Arnis techniques to their training. I do not see it going the other way.
This is a good point. The art within your art concept shouldn't be forgotten here. As I pointed out above, the movements can and likely will be flavoured by the way the practitioner's body knows how to move. Given the way the art was marketed, there are tons of people all over the world with a base in some other art(s) that are adapting these principles to fit within their structure.

Please bear in mind, I haven't seen enough practitioners from different influences move to formulate a global opinion on this; all I can really contribute is what my own experiences have been.
 

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Flatlander said:
Though I never had the opportunity to meet or train with the late Professor, I do find the above difficult to believe.

Dan I recommend you try to meet as many of those who did train with the late Professor. Not to change your training or who you train with, just to see.

Flatlander said:
There seems to be a lot of talk of "empty hand" anyos and "cane anyos". There's a difference? I have learned 3 anyos, and they are done with either one cane, 2 canes, empty hand, with one blade, 2 blades, cane and blade, or with the sibat. The "form" of the anyos is the same throughout. When I do the anyos emptyhanded, the movements are "rounded" and flowing. There is no "karate" influence in them, and these are the only forms that I have ever learned. These anyos were taught to me by my instructor, who learned them directly from Datu Kelly Worden. The only time I have seen Datu do them is on tape, and his interpretation of them does not seem to be karate influenced.

There were four cane forms in the Pink Book and from those in the PI. Once in the States the Professor added in first 5 "empty hand" forms. Later he added in another three over time. The first five made his video tape series in the mid 80's.

As to how you can do the forms, it is true you can do any of the forms with any weapon, as you stated.

Also in the late 80's there were the translations of the forms, so the linearness of the forms can be modified, for different translations of movements of the foot work. This is something that Datu Kelly teaches even if he does not use the same words I used here. :)

Flatlander said:
Now, having said that, I can easily adapt the movements to take on more of a JKD flavour, and demonstrate the linear trapping applications within them. This works really nicely with the blade in a reverse grip.

Dan this is one the nice things I have seen from Modern Arnis players is that they can adapt well.

Flatlander said:
This is a peculiar statement. Who developed and codified this art? I don't think we can appeal to a higher authority on Modern Arnis than the Professor, can we? I think the question is, did Modern Arnis exist as a firm concept before Professor began teaching outside of the Phillipines? I believe that it probably did. With that in mind, is it correct to say that Kenpo exits within Modern Arnis, or that Modern Arnis exists within Kenpo? I can say this much: there is no Kenpo in my Modern Arnis.

There was a required corriculum yet as time went by the Professor would add in technique strings or drills to help people. He also added in more translations for people to see how it was all the same.

Flatlander said:
This is a good point. The art within your art concept shouldn't be forgotten here. As I pointed out above, the movements can and likely will be flavoured by the way the practitioner's body knows how to move. Given the way the art was marketed, there are tons of people all over the world with a base in some other art(s) that are adapting these principles to fit within their structure.

And those who only trained in FMA or Modern Arnis, from Modern Arnis instructors, would move like Modern Arnis. ;)

Your art within your art.

Flatlander said:
Please bear in mind, I haven't seen enough practitioners from different influences move to formulate a global opinion on this; all I can really contribute is what my own experiences have been.

Like I said, go and check those out you can for yourself. :)
 

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Thanks Rich. :asian: I definitely will as time and money continue to flow my way. That's one of the great things about this board: I am able to understand the various people a little bit better, and this will influence the direction that my personal journey takes. I'm better able to make an informed decision, rather than just winging it.
 

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arnisador said:
I don't see any influence of Kenpo back into Modern Arnis.


As Jerome pointed out, I see that the Kenpo Practitioners helped to spread and support GM Remy Presas. I did not doubt this point at all, and Credit should be given to these individuals for their support and spreading the art.

I also do not see, where it was a direct influence into the system, not in the naming, not in the techniques, nor in the execution. So, as Jerome stated, there is not direct technique link, but the initial support was there, and worth noting.
 

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Rich,

I also do not see, where it was a direct influence into the system, not in the naming, not in the techniques, nor in the execution. So, as Jerome stated, there is not direct technique link, but the initial support was there, and worth noting.

There might be some technical influences as well. There are several single arm actions that are kenpo-like (e.g. anyo 2 forearm block into elbow strike into overhead arm clear - Mano y Mano page 76 or the arm entrapment, elbow strike, follow up knee strike combo from anyo 5, page 100). RP was hooked up with Rich Alemany and Bruce Juchnik back in the latter 1970's and he was a keen observer. I might try to track Rick and Bruce down to see if they saw any change in his empty hand applications from when they first met him. Interesting possibility but currently conjecture.

Yours,
Dan

PS - The Complete Cellar Door 1970 concerts by Miles Davis are due for a street release of Sept 26th. Way cool!
 
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arnisador said:
I don't see any influence of Kenpo back into Modern Arnis.
Hi Jeff,

You are looking in the wrong place. The major inflence of Kenpo ON Modern Arnis is in the organizational structure that some Kenpo/Kajukenbo people attempted to put in place for the fledgling IMAF/USA in the middle 1980's.
Some stuff stuck most did not. The administrative leadership of the original IMAF/USA aside from Professor as the President and Founder was mostly Parker Kenpo and Kajukenbo people.

From my training with Sifu Don Zanghi and cross training with PG Tom Bolden, I can identify from the Tracy prespective nearly 30 techniques where Tracy Kenpo and Modern Arnis converge. There was no need for Professor to take on or assume Kenpo style movements or techniques per se, they already existed in his Modern Arnis movement references. By the same token, the transition from Tracy, Parker or Kajukenbo in terms of movement and/or technique was quite easy and natural. The movements and concepts were very similar. That gave the kenpoists and kajukenboists a decided advantage in adding Modern Arnis to their own versions of the arts. They were quite adept at establishing the "art within your art" motif as a reality.

Influences do not have to obvious and phyically observable to have occurred. It was the Kenpo/Kajukenbo Connection through the Hawaiian Based Arts of Kajukenbo, Parker Kenpo and Tracy Kenpo that first gave Professor an excellent set of networks to work through as he estaablished and solidified his seminar and camp tours that ran from 1975 to 200 in the USA, Canada and Europe. Professor used the assistance of GM Max Pallen and his network of schools to get a foothold in the USA as a newly landed refugee in exile. Looking at the history of how Modern Arnis developed in the USA as a movement requires that one examine and understand the Kenpo/Kajukenbo Connection on the structural/organizational levels not in terms of techniques or physical movement as may be the case with Small Circle Jiu-jitsu.

I would also add that there is very little to suggest that the Okinawan or Japanese based Kempo arts share the same influence as Hawaiian based arts mentioned above.

Respectfully,

Jerome Barber, Ed.D.
 

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Couldn't the same be said for Small Circle and DKI? With the network that they shared all three systems gained more exposure. I would also say that it wasn't the art of Kenpo but the people training in the art that helped in it's growth.


:asian:
 
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WMAA said:
Couldn't the same be said for Small Circle and DKI? With the network that they shared all three systems gained more exposure. I would also say that it wasn't the art of Kenpo but the people training in the art that helped in it's growth.

:asian:
That's a a fairly precise and definative splitting of hairs because the people are the art... you can't have an art without people. This also leads me to the following comments. In 1975, GM Ed Parker, invited Professor to demonstrate his Modern Arnis at the first major US event for Professor - the International Karate Championships in Long Beach CA. Assisting Professor were, Dean Stockwell, Max Pallen (misspelled Pollen in the article) and seven (7) of Pallen's students. (IKF, p.58, 1991)

Six months later, Professor, gave his second major Modern Arnis demo in NYC at the "Oriental World of Self Defense" in Madison Square Garden and that program was later televised nationally and internationally on ABC's "Wide World of Sports". This was the first time that Modern Arnis or any FMA had been given any exposure on the East Coast of the US. Professor was assisted at this demo by Roland Dantes, Dio Gonzales, John Almario and Antonio Tito. The NYC demo also gave Professor an opportunity to meet Moses Powell, Thomas LaPuppet, Jim Power and Florindo Visitacion. (IKF, p.58, 1991)

The Kenpo Connection is quite clear right from begining in 1975 with Max Pallen and Ed Parker being in the fore-front of aiding Professor in getting established in the US. If my informants are correct, Max Pallen not only sponsored Professor's entry into the US, he also provided Professor with a residence in his own home. It certinly seems very likely that there was an immediate exchange with GM Pallen's students if seven of them assisted the first major demo of Modern Arnis within a few months of Professor's arrival in the US.

It is my contention that the Kajukenbo/Parker-Tracy Kenpo Connection to Modern Arnis is quite easily explained. All three arts are Hawaiian based and share some common lineage. These ares are part of the James Mitose - William Chow line and Adriano Emperado studied under both men. He was a 5th degree black belt under Professor Chow and the lead instructor under Chow for a number of years, including several years when Ed Parker was studying Chow's Kenpo Karate as an underbelt. Sijo Emperado was already an accomplished Eskrimador before he began his Kenpo studies under Chow. The FMA were thriving in secret in Hawaii, while the Karate and Kung Fu arts were being openly taught. Therefore it is very likely that people like Sijo Emperado, Victor Gascon, Sid Ascension and Joe Emperado very quietly and skillfully incorperated Eskrima concepts into their Kenpo training over time. After all is said and done, Kajukenbo/Parker-Tracy Kenpo have angular stepping, empty hand knife defenses with traping hands type features, stick/club defense, joint locks, rotational throws and take downs within their respective systems.
These instructors and students already had the basic skills foundation to incorperate and utilize single and double stick training when it came into their martial training. The Kenpo people were simply adding "the art within their art" and some detailed in-depth training when they met Professor.

If the truth be told, these Kajukenbo/kenpo trained people could have adapted to virtually any FMA instructor and system. Time and circustance simply placed Professor and Max Pallen together and as they so often say, the rest is history. It was the right place at the right time with the right personalities meshing that allowed the Modern Arnis system founder to prosper and grow in the USA.

Since most of us were not around in 1975, we really don't know what if anything Professor took from the Kenpo side, but since he himself includes that short piece about Kenpo being an influence on him/his art, in his 1983 book, published by Ohara, denying any influences from Kenpo is not realistic because that means that Professor lied in his presentation, from that perspective. It would take a Max Pallen, Bruce Juchnik, Rick Almeny or Fred King to clearly tell us what Professor changed in Modern Arnis between roughly 1975 and 1990 with regards to the Kenpo influence on the art itself.

I would like to leave you with one final quote from the 1991 article that I have cited above. Professor told his interviewer, Rick Mitchell, "I look forward to the unity of Filipino martial arts. There must be room for differences - hopefully working sid by side. This is a free country. But if there is to be true unity of purpose within the Filipino martial arts we must encourage each other to grow rather than alienate or attack each other..." (IKF, p. 89, 1991)

Jerome Barber, Ed.D.

Note: Citations and quotes taken from Inside Kung Fu, January 1991, V. 18,
No. 1. "Presas Takes his Modern Arnis to the World" by Rick Mitchell.

An additional side note, on page 29 of that issue you will find the once standard video tape/Summer camp full column advertisment and included is the notice for the East Coast Summer camp, June 6, 7, 8, 9 at 4041 Southwestern Blvd., Orchard Park, NY. That just happens to be one of the camps that I ran for Professor at that location.
 

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Unfortunately I do not have this issue. I am stil looking for a copy.

I do have December 1990 which had the forerunner article, which discussed some early history and also GM RP's exit from the PI.

From Page 38: ** Note lack of caps for names of arts is as printed in the magazine.
IKF: What else did you do to expand your knowledge of martial arts and to develop modern arnis?

RP: In 1961, I applied for a teaching position at La Salle College in my province, where I was given the opportunity to study and teach kodokan judo under the Philippine Amatuer Judo Association (PAJA), and also shotokan karate. My involvement with Judo and Karate served as a springboard to promote Filipino martial arts. Also, I incoprprated skills from judo and karate into modern arnis to further develop my art.
. . .


This was published in December of 1990, and if the Professor does not state that Kenpo influenced, yet he quotes that both Judo and Karate were used to influence Modern Arnis, it makes me believe that the Kenpo influence was introduction of people not in the flavor or techniques of the art.

Also this article states that Max Pollen (Pallen) of the Oakland Filipino Jaycees who was also a Kajukenbo instructor, was in Manila, PI. and this is where the two met.

I do not discredit those that helped, introduced and trained in the begining years. Those that started in Michigan in 1975/76 were all TKD based, as Kenpo in any form is not common. I do not think that TKD also influenced Modern Arnis as Balintawak, or the family system or Judo or Karate did.

No disrespect Jerome, for like I said I see your point of how far the art was able to spread is most definitely worth a mention and those involved should be recognized for the involvement.


:asian:
 

Tgace

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If a specific art is spreading MA then I cant see how that art cant help but bleed into MA.
 

RickRed

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arnisador said:
I don't see any influence of Kenpo back into Modern Arnis.
http://www.wmarnis.com/pdfs/black.pdf
This curriculum and terminology looks like a blend of many FMA and Kenpo influences and not just Modern Arnis.

I don't know how someone wouldn't end up influencing any art with their other training. Some of the best Mixed martial artists were college/High School wrestlers or boxers or traditionally trained artists before they made it their own and blended that with other things.

It would be like saying that a sculptor wouldn't bring some of that to pottery when he changed over.
 

Rich Parsons

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Tgace said:
If a specific art is spreading MA then I cant see how that art cant help but bleed into MA.


So, TKD both ITF and WTF, and some Kung Fu and what have you also influenced the art.

So, anyone who trained before they trained in Modern Arnis, influenced the art?

So, if someone who was in the military and then trained in Modern Arnis, now the art of Modern Arnis is influenced by the Military?

I do not see the connection everyone is trying to force here. I see that there were people who trained elsewhere and then trained in Modern Arnis, and many of them went and trained in other arts as well.
 

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RickRed said:
http://www.wmarnis.com/pdfs/black.pdf
This curriculum and terminology looks like a blend of many FMA and Kenpo influences and not just Modern Arnis.

I don't know how someone wouldn't end up influencing any art with their other training. Some of the best Mixed martial artists were college/High School wrestlers or boxers or traditionally trained artists before they made it their own and blended that with other things.

It would be like saying that a sculptor wouldn't bring some of that to pottery when he changed over.


To be honest, you need to ask Tim Hartman about the names he uses. They are not the same terms I use, and are not the common terms used by everyone. I believe they are what he uses for his organization.
 
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