The Effects of High Kicking

S

Satelite

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Ok you guys have got me concerned.
But what about the people who are extremely conditioned, who do hip strengthening often. Who give body enough rest to heal. I heard that dancers (and those guys have hip replacements more than everybody else), can remain safe, if they are careful.
 

Marginal

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F0E said:
Alright, leaning to do high kicks that are side based is that more natural?
What if you have the leg supporting you bent does that effect the dynamics of kicking, I guess were lots of changes in the way the kick was thrown attempted to find the least stressful one. How much of a roll does flexiblity play, if any?
Judging by what's been said so far, it would seem that a side kick thrown essentially like a back kick would fall into the natural range of motion. (Not really doing anything different there than when you're doing a front kick in terms of leg alignment.) If I'm mistaken on this, nothing's been posted do far to contradict that conclusion based on the evidence presented so far.
 

Doc

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Marginal said:
Judging by what's been said so far, it would seem that a side kick thrown essentially like a back kick would fall into the natural range of motion. (Not really doing anything different there than when you're doing a front kick in terms of leg alignment.) If I'm mistaken on this, nothing's been posted do far to contradict that conclusion based on the evidence presented so far.
Predicated on specific body mechanics and teaching methodology, you would be correct sir.
 

Kenpodoc

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Doc said:
Predicated on specific body mechanics and teaching methodology, you would be correct sir.
Doc, what's your opinion about stretching and kicking joint damage. Does stretching limit injury or does it increase injury by allowing more free movement of the joint. I'm convinced that good mechanics of kicks will limit injuries. (Exactly what good mechanics are is another question.) I also can be convinced that proper stretching will limit muscle injuries. I'm not conviced that stretching limits either joint or ligamentous injuries.

Thanks,

Jeff
 

Kenpodoc

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Doc said:
Simple. Look at the previous posts and responses. Make a decision if you want to do it or not, or seek in-person professional help with a medical professional for assistance.
The problem here is that most of us don't have the information available to accurately answer these questions. I find that physicians tend to recommend too many restrictions. It's harder to be sued for recommending that a non essential activity be avoided than to be sued for advising a patient to try an activity. Even most sports oriented physicians and therapists know little about sports outside of the football, soccer, basketball, aseball group.

Respectfully,

Jeff
 

Doc

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Kenpodoc said:
Doc, what's your opinion about stretching and kicking joint damage. Does stretching limit injury or does it increase injury by allowing more free movement of the joint. I'm convinced that good mechanics of kicks will limit injuries. (Exactly what good mechanics are is another question.) I also can be convinced that proper stretching will limit muscle injuries. I'm not conviced that stretching limits either joint or ligamentous injuries.

Thanks,

Jeff
As you know sir, controlled stretching of all types is good for the body, especially as we age. I have long been a strong advocate in this area, and you are absolutely correct in your assertion that "good mechanics will limit ... injuries." You are equally correct regarding the effect on joint injuries, where stretching in and of itself only affects the range of movement, but does not protect the joint from associated long term misuse injury. These injuries are related to your third observation and assertion. Few seem to actually know what constitutes "good mechanics." Thus we have people with no background knowledge or education teaching others to stretch, kick, punch, and move forcefully damaging their bodies over time. But stretching in an of itself will not damage joints in general because the muscle and supporting soft ligament tissue will sustain damage first, protecting the joint from injury. Only in extreme violent circumstances over extended periods of time, or short suddent violent hyperextensions seen in inertia driven accidents will both occur simultaneously. If these "instructors" were pro coaches, they would be fired because of poor performance of their "students," and/or excessive injuries indicating poor mechanics. Historically, the martial arts has always beed taught through what I term "mimic modeling." A teacher shows what to do, and the student attempts to "copy" the movement. That means the art is being taught aesthetically, without the benefit of a true understanding of, or regard for, subcutaneous interaction of its architecture.

Recently one of my 105 course students (green) approached me about hitting a heavy bag. I don't allow this activity because it breeds poor mechanics in an effor to "hit hard," and is unecessary in the way we train. I told him he was capable of hitting quite hard and really had no need of that kind of training. At one time or another, everyone has dropped someone in our curriculum with minimum effort as a course of our training method. Still he insisted he wanted to test it. So with my blessing he was off to a boxing gym to punch a heavy bag. Acouple of weeks later he came into the school with a huge grin on his face. He said, he had gone to the gym and he "had no idea he could hit so hard." He told me how he rocked the bag with no discomfort or injury, and that it actually drew the attention of others watching him pounding the heavy bag, Once again he said, "I never knew I could it so hard." I said, "I did." and walked away.

The sport approach to martial arts in this country and others, is built around youth, its accompaning muscle mass, and blunt force trauma execution training. True martial science is a higher level of understanding, teaching, and execution with minimal injuries short or long term sir. You are correct on every count.
 
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