The basic punching techniques

DeLamar.J

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:boxing:
The Jab

This punch has many purposes:
Increase the distance between you and your opponent.
Use it to set up other punches and punch combinations.
Or, use the jab simply as a solid blow to your opponent's face.

Step 1:
(The jab is always thrown with your forward hand) Shift most of your weight onto your right (back) leg. This assists in counterbalancing your body when you throw the punch.

Step 2:
Fully extend your arm. Just before your fist/glove strikes the target, rotate your hand so that your thumb is facing the floor. Remember to keep your wrists straight to avoid injury. Also, keep your elbow slightly flexed at the point of impact (otherwise, you might hyperextend it).

Step 3:
Return your arm back to your body. Remember, the punch always remains on one plane-throw and retract your punch without weaving up or down or side to side.

Step 4:
Do not allow your shoulders to lead. This may cause you to bend at the waist when making your punch. Keep your shoulders back.

Step 5:
When throwing your jab, keep your muscles slightly tensed. Anchor your punch by contracting your back and butt muscles.
It is important that the movement of your feet coincides with the movement and placement of your punch. Properly stepping with the jab will ensure that your punch is effective.


Some things to remember:
When punching with your left hand, step forward with your left foot. As your foot contacts the floor, your arm should reach its full extension. (Remember to keep your elbow flexed when throwing this punch.)
At this point, your weight is primarily distributed to your right leg. Now, you have invaded your opponent's space and delivered a punch to their face.

After completing the punch, return your arm to its position level with your left cheek. Bring your rear foot up so that your feet are in their correct, original stance, slightly more than shoulder width apart.

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The Straight-Right

Use the straight right after you have set up an opening with your jab.

Step 1:
After establishing your stance, shift your weight to your left leg. Pivot your right (rear) foot so that your toes are pointing forward, while simultaneously delivering a right punch. Remember to push against the floor with your rear foot. (At the very last moment, rotate your fist so that your thumb is facing the floor.)

Step 2:
Pull your hand back on the same plane the punch was thrown. Return your rear foot to its original position-toes pointing between 12 and 2 o'clock.
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The Hook

Unlike the other punches, the hook is a bent-arm punch. The power of this punch is generated by a move known as a body whirl. In order to perfect this punch, try to master each movement one step at a time before going on to the next step.

Step 1: The Body Whirl
Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Your weight should be equally distributed between your feet. Bring your fists together and hold them against your chest (with palms facing your chest).

Step 2:
Shift your weight to your right leg while simultaneously rotating your body to the right. Pivot on the ball of your left foot so that your toes end up pointing toward your right foot. You will notice that this movement causes your arms to move along with it. Stop rotating when your elbow reaches about the midpoint in front of you.

Step 3:
Try this move again with a slight variation. Shift your weight to the right foot. Pivot on the ball of you left foot until your toes point toward your right foot. Immediately, snap your left arm up into a ninety-degree angle. Your left fist should stop at a midpoint in front of you.
This is called a lateral punch. The power of the hook comes from the momentum of your body rotating and the resistance of your foot pushing off of the floor. At this point, the left side of your torso should be in line with the direction of your punch.


Step 4:
Return your left foot back to its original position and bring your left fist back to its cheek level position.

Some things to remember:
The Right hook and left hook are virtually the same. The only difference is that you rotate your body in opposite directions.

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The Uppercut

Step 1:
To throw a right uppercut, start in the classic boxing stance with the back (right) knee bent. Lower the right shoulder to drop the right side of the body in a semi-crouch position. Remember to keep the left fist up by the chin to protect the head.

Step 2:
Now as you rotate the hips forward, push the ball of the back foot, (the right foot), and punch the right fist up towards the target. The right side of the back and the right shoulder will follow through with the rotation of the hips.

Step 3:
The hips finish being squared to the front. The right arm always stays close to the body and moves upward in a semi-circle. For the most effective and powerful punch, keep the elbow bent at a right angle during the delivery and follow through.

Step 4:
Uppercuts to the body will cause the opponent's body to fall forward. Step away slightly and complete the combination with another uppercut to the head.

Some things to remember:
When practicing this punch stay close to the target. If the punch is thrown from the outside, the opponent will be able to easily detect that the punch is coming and counter with an effective straight punch. An uppercut from the outside also loses some of its power because the arm is no longer bent at the elbow and cannot effectively transfer the total body's force in the upward movement.

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Punching the Heavy Bag

Step 1:
After wrapping your hands, put on a suitable pair of bag gloves. Gloves will help absorb the shock of your punches and protect your hands from abrasion.

Step 2:
Extend your arm so that your glove touches the heavy bag. Determine your reach or your punching distance. Execute a jab. As the arm is extended the glove should be in tight contact with the bag. Repeat a few times to become comfortable with the feel.
Remember the following when striking the heavy bag:
Always...

Clench your fists.
Make sure your wrists are straight.
Keep your elbows slightly flexed
Turn with your shoulders
Twist at the waist
Push with your hips and toes
Keep your knees bent

Step 3:
Focus and hit in the center of the bag. Each time you throw a punch, exhale. This will help regulate your breathing and give you some extra mmphh! Many athletes believe that exhaling makes it less likely to get your wind knocked out.

Step 4:
Watch as the bag moves away and hit it directly and quickly as it returns to you. Mix up the straight punches, a few jabs and then a straight right. Always try to punch through the heavy bag, rather than at it.

Step 5:
Next, add movement and more power. Step into the punches and step out. The glove hand moves forward as the front foot moves forward. The glove returns back to the shoulder as the back foot returns back.

Step 6:
Now have a plan and mix it up a bit. Move around, slip and throw a few jabs to determine your reach and target area. Move in closer to the bag and throw hooks and uppercuts
 
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DeLamar.J

DeLamar.J

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O yea, and make sure to play the rocky soundtrack while doing this :lol:


rockycollage.jpg
 
R

RHD

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Hmmm...Those are all specific to Western boxing. It may come as a surprise to some people, but there are many systems that do not use Western bosing hand work at all.
Mike
 
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DeLamar.J

DeLamar.J

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RHD said:
Hmmm...Those are all specific to Western boxing. It may come as a surprise to some people, but there are many systems that do not use Western bosing hand work at all.
Mike
:xtrmshock: They need to wake up and smell the coff. jk.
 
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Firona

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I noticed you didn't put any backhand in that list. Although it isn't used in western boxing the backhand punch can be extremely useful, especially when the opponent doesn't see it coming. I would explain how to do it in steps and whatnot but I think I would probably leave something out so i will forego that opportunity.
 

Andrew Green

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Firona said:
I noticed you didn't put any backhand in that list. Although it isn't used in western boxing the backhand punch can be extremely useful, especially when the opponent doesn't see it coming. I would explain how to do it in steps and whatnot but I think I would probably leave something out so i will forego that opportunity.
Throwing a backhand leaves you exposed while you through it. It also is fairly easy to defend and doesn't have access to any important targets on a properly covered up fighter. Yes a spinning backhand can end a fight, but it is not a primary technique. It is something you use when the other guy is already tired and hurt.
 

Andrew Green

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RHD said:
Hmmm...Those are all specific to Western boxing. It may come as a surprise to some people, but there are many systems that do not use Western bosing hand work at all.
Mike
See how well they've done in mixed full contact competition :D
 
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Firona

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Andrew Green said:
Throwing a backhand leaves you exposed while you through it. It also is fairly easy to defend and doesn't have access to any important targets on a properly covered up fighter. Yes a spinning backhand can end a fight, but it is not a primary technique. It is something you use when the other guy is already tired and hurt.
The only backhand I throw comes from my lower hand and snaps up to the chin or side of the face, when you rotate out of it you can almost always land a hook if they have blocked and when done properly you are suddenly in the opposite stance from which you started without being exposed.
 

TigerWoman

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Hey, I just watched Rocky again last night. Those were great details, DeLamar, learned some, will have to try those out. That was a saver. We also do backfist. We can only light touch any hand techniques in sparring, but on the bag we whale! TW
 

Andrew Green

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RHD said:
How well have boxers done? :boing1:

Mike
How many pro mma fighters can you name that have not trained in boxing?

Pure boxers get ther butts handed to them, that is a given. But there skills are a neccessary part of the complete package.
 

Andrew Green

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Firona said:
The only backhand I throw comes from my lower hand and snaps up to the chin or side of the face, when you rotate out of it you can almost always land a hook if they have blocked and when done properly you are suddenly in the opposite stance from which you started without being exposed.
Which if covered up properly according to basic full contact standards, is where his hand should be, and you would have just ate a jab and have a follow up coming your way...

It works great in pointfighting. Was one of my biggest scorers when I did that. But in a full contact environment it is not what it is in point fighting / no contact / light contact.
 
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RHD

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Andrew Green said:
How many pro mma fighters can you name that have not trained in boxing?

Pure boxers get ther butts handed to them, that is a given. But there skills are a neccessary part of the complete package.

I can't name many...but then again, I don't follow the sport on a regular basis. I mean no disrespect to boxing skills, my original post had to do with the fact that there are many other fist based skills out there that are not of a Western boxing base.

Is this going to turn into an "MMA is bettter" thing? If so, have a nice day.
Mike
 

Andrew Green

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RHD said:
I can't name many...but then again, I don't follow the sport on a regular basis. I mean no disrespect to boxing skills, my original post had to do with the fact that there are many other fist based skills out there that are not of a Western boxing base.

Is this going to turn into an "MMA is bettter" thing? If so, have a nice day.
Mike
Not at all.

It is a different things work in different environments thing.

basic strikes are almost always the same or similar though, the subtilties are different.

Even in styles that do not use western boxing there are linear punches (Jabs / uppercuts) Circular punches (hooks) and upward punches (uppercuts) those are the basis for any punching style.

Other things like overhands, knife hands, back hands, ridge hands, etc. Might be there, but they are not the primary techniques.

In bare knuckle fighting the backfist has a couple of other targets that can come in, and it is a quick precision shot. But still not a primary technique.

The only place it is really a primary technique is in point fighting.

This thread was called "Basic punching techniques" and the backfist is rarely a primary attack.
 

Zepp

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Andrew Green said:
In bare knuckle fighting the backfist has a couple of other targets that can come in, and it is a quick precision shot. But still not a primary technique.

The only place it is really a primary technique is in point fighting.

This thread was called "Basic punching techniques" and the backfist is rarely a primary attack.

Actually, I've found a way to use the backfist as a lead technique that's turned out to be useful so far. You can throw a backfist with your lead hand similar to the way you'd throw a jab. I'll use it in place of a jab every so often. You probably won't KO someone with it, but it can good for opening your opponent up or as a distraction.
 
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DeLamar.J

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This is some advice I gave another person on defence, combine this with the basic punches and you will have a very basic, and very effective arsenal, that no one will be able to be taken lightly.


Its hard to tell you what to when sparring because its so unpredictable. I could tell you one thing then your partner counter that and then you would be stuck again. You just need more time sparring so you get used to it and react without thinking so much about what to do, then you will be much better. Here, Im gonna try to give you the best advice possible over the net. read carefully and remember this.

Keep your hands up gaurding you face and your elbows close gaurding your body, if someone is faster than you its easy for them to pop you in the face if its wide open, with your hands already there, you only have to adjust to block a very short distance, like nose to eye, jaw to temple, thats alot better than waist to jaw wouldnt you say? If they go for the body just lean so your elbows are there. move the elbow and forearm in front of the blow and absorb it. Your elbows are already there, you just barely have to adjust to block. But make sure to lean so your hands stay in front of your face!

Use hands to block hands, and feet to block feet. If someones sees you are gaurding your face good they will try to kick you low so you drop your hands , then pop you in the face, keep your hands up! dont fall for it! Lift up your knee to block and absorb the kick. This way you never get faked out to drop your hands. If they kick high, keep your hands up and kick at there knee.

Please, let me know how this helps you.

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Cool. Im glad to have helped you out. I can tell the use legs to block legs, and hands to block hands will stick with you. But be sure to read all of it though. make sure to lean to block body shots too so you dont drop your hands to block and get popped in the face. the exeption to the rule of hands to block hands, and feet to block feet is when they throw high kicks. Still keep your hands up, and kick at the knee. high kicks are very risky and you are asking to get your other leg knocked out from under you if you abuse them. As a general rule, anytime somone throws a high kick at me,I kick the leg they are standing on with everything I got, most good martial artists realize the disadvantages of throwing high kicks and will not do it against a good opponent. I teach this same strategy to my students. it takes alittle time to get it down, the funniest thing is when I tell a new guy, when I kick at your balls,or stomach, dont drop your hands or Im gonna pop your face, then we spar a little, and I kick low, and instinct makes them drop there hand to stop the kick, and bam! right in the face lololol. Right after I got done telling them not to drop there guard. You will do it to most likely. Just get used to fighting that way and it will become second nature. Then I will talk to you about offence.
 

James Kovacich

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Andrew Green said:
How many pro mma fighters can you name that have not trained in boxing?

Pure boxers get ther butts handed to them, that is a given. But there skills are a neccessary part of the complete package.
They're more likely to train in Kickboxing than western boxing.
 

Marginal

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akja said:
They're more likely to train in Kickboxing than western boxing.

That's not terribly important as far as disctinctions go in terms of punching basics. On top of that folks like Don Frye mainly just had boxing and wrestling in their backgrounds so it's silly to suggest that someone who crosstrains with boxing isn't going to be effective as long as they have a grappling component to back it up as well.
 

James Kovacich

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Marginal said:
That's not terribly important as far as disctinctions go in terms of punching basics. On top of that folks like Don Frye mainly just had boxing and wrestling in their backgrounds so it's silly to suggest that someone who crosstrains with boxing isn't going to be effective as long as they have a grappling component to back it up as well.
Don did box professionally but he crosstrained in Jujitsu and other submission arts to get where he is.
 
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