Technique Extensions

I'm not sure I quite understand what you mean by technique extensions, explain?

(if it's anything like hair extensions, i'd say avoid it)
 
I like and teach the extensions but I sometimes think it would be bettter for the blackbelt to work more on the what if and the formulation phase of the base techs. and spend more time on that. I think students get too caught up in wanting to learn the next move. Having said that there is a lot of redundency in some of the extensions, bu it can only make you better right?
 
Originally posted by eternalwhitebelt

I like and teach the extensions but I sometimes think it would be bettter for the blackbelt to work more on the what if and the formulation phase of the base techs. and spend more time on that. I think students get too caught up in wanting to learn the next move. Having said that there is a lot of redundency in some of the extensions, bu it can only make you better right?


I admit, some of the extensions look redundant, but they aren't, if you really know what they're for (trust me, it's like deciphering forms without knowledge of the techs without proper instruction). Our Wed. nite class is a constant reminder of the rearrangement concept, formulation, and let's see which limb we can twist the furthest before it breaks class. We love it, and the extensions. They give us even more of a base to play with in the other phases




Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde
 
Keep 'em.
I'd like to learn more of them!
There are a lot of good ideas within them.
Jason Farnsworth
 
I was going to create a new thread for this, but I think this one
is appropriate. I hear things like "Mr So-and-So teaches the
32 extension, and Mr So-and-So teaches 24" ... and I also hear
that there are 154 or 155 (depending on who ya talk to) base
techniques. I realized that i have NO idea what extensions are.

I'd always thought that it was something like doing a lower belt
tech, for example's sake, 5 swords (my fave). It ends with a
handsword to the back of the neck .. so you'd maybe do a knee
to the head, knife edge to the knee, foot stomp or something
to that effect, and that this tech with the "extension" had a new
name. I think I'm wrong on this now, so can someone explain
this to me?
 
Starting at either 2nd brown or black, depending on whether your doing 32 or 24 or 16, there are Extensions for all the techniques starting with the Orange belt ones. You would have the base move, Clutching Feathers, then you would have the extension for it, which I think is like 3 or 4 more strikes (I don't realy know it, but my instructor did it on me once).


:asian:
 
Originally posted by Klondike93

Starting at either 2nd brown or black, depending on whether your doing 32 or 24 or 16, there are Extensions for all the techniques starting with the Orange belt ones. You would have the base move, Clutching Feathers, then you would have the extension for it, which I think is like 3 or 4 more strikes (I don't realy know it, but my instructor did it on me once).


:asian:

Is it still called Clutching Feathers?
 
One basic extension for Clutching Feathers resembles something I was taught, early on, about Shielding Hammer: after the right raking middle knuckle, let that strike carry you through into a left reverse bow accompanied by a right hammer/right heel-kick to the groin...then run away, 'cause if that don't work...

I don't find the extensions redundant at all: to begin with, they pushed me toward moving my feet. Among other things, they're an exploration of footwork and changing rhythms in kenpo. Certainly, the way I move has changed radically since I started really getting some of the extensions at around 1st brown.

Hope this helps.
 
Clyde and Mr Robertson,

I think I understand where you are coming from. I tend to think differently about Kenpo when compared to others. As far as understanding of the extensions, I think Huk, Mr Sepulveda, Mr. Speakman and your instructor Mr. Tatum, did a good job of teaching and explaing them to me. I have been both unfortunate and lucky to have to learn from various seniors during my journey. All of them have different views on there purpose and there usefulness. Yes I do agree with you on some things as far as new motions and so on. However Mr. Robertson it has been my experience that students get caught up in learning the new dance steps. My opinion is that after learning the 154 base techs. and the empty handed forms the student would be better suited to go over the material they know and simply refine it without spending that time on learning new material. Having said that I still teach the extensions with some what of a reservation. I try not to put my bias on the student so I do teach them the material as it was taught to me and let them then make the descision of what they want to work on.
 
Originally posted by Kirk



Is it still called Clutching Feathers?


Yes, as far as I know it's still the same name.

I had been told that the extensions are there because when doing the 32 technique system they ran out of material at 2nd brown, so they just went back and added extensions to the others starting at orange belt. They being Mr. Parker and some of his black belts. Any truth to this GD?


:asian:
 
... I teach them and practice them. Things are found in them which allowed me to become much more comfortable with variable expansion and filling the "dead space." No new principles, concepts, or theories which cannot be found in the basic techniques, but rather they added yet another layer of sophistication to my Kenpo.

-Michael
UKS-Texas
 
So why are they called "extensions" and not "suffixes?" It seems to me that if you aren't learning any new principles of motion, the extensions would go with the idea of "sentences of motion," and thus should be considered a suffix to the technique.

My other thought is that if they aren't giving you new principles of motion, why learn fixed extensions? Why not just improvise suffixes?

Nowhere near this stuff on the learning curve, but curious nonetheless....

Tad Finnegan
 
We don't do the extensions. The thought here is that at that level you should be able to add or improvise your own extensions, not someone elses. Learning more fixed motions isn't going to help too much. Other than it looks cool.


R
 
So why are they called "extensions" and not "suffixes?"

I beleive a suffix is an additional movement (1) added after the base and a extension is a series (more than 1) of movements added after the base.

Rob
 
If you ask me, most of the techniques are too long anyway, I like the really short ones. Very few of the longer ones would ever be done to completion.

If you extend them, it makes the problem even worse....!

Ian.
 
Originally posted by satans.barber

If you ask me, most of the techniques are too long anyway, I like the really short ones. Very few of the longer ones would ever be done to completion.

If you extend them, it makes the problem even worse....!

Ian.


Most of the people that i know, non kenpo or MA at all for that matter, that have seen different techniques worked on people say the same thing. "Man....that seems like a bit of overkill don't you think."
I just laugh and tell them that we always want to make sure it will be safe so that we can run away.
 

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