Striking Serpents Head

R

Rainman

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Originally posted by Touch'O'Death
As if the neutral wasn't also transitional :shrug:

Sure and once the stance is stomped into for structure with the aid of gravitational marriage and positive body position it is time to finish the technique. So if we are using intermittent power and utilizing some of the major conduits of power ie, rotational force, centrifugal force, centripital force, gravitational marriage, body momentum and directional harmony we should keep moving in and out of many stances.

I think one of the problems is the cross and cover out at the end of the sd teks where people pose there. Not very smart. If someone had the need to use self defense get out of danger completely by removing yourself from the area.
 

Touch Of Death

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The way I see it is if you are not constantly adjusting for neutrality, it is not a neutral. After its moment has past it becomes a "bad" neutral. I just thought it was funny how the stance got named as other than transitional.:rofl: :rofl: :D
Sean
 

Doc

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Originally posted by Rainman
Sure and once the stance is stomped into for structure with the aid of gravitational marriage and positive body position it is time to finish the technique. So if we are using intermittent power and utilizing some of the major conduits of power ie, rotational force, centrifugal force, centripital force, gravitational marriage, body momentum and directional harmony we should keep moving in and out of many stances.

I think one of the problems is the cross and cover out at the end of the sd teks where people pose there. Not very smart. If someone had the need to use self defense get out of danger completely by removing yourself from the area.

I, of course, agree with both Rainman & Touch O' Death. All stances in anatomy are mechanically transitional, however I also allow that "conceptually" in the way a person may be taught that a stance can be designated "static" for the purposes of the curriculum. What is an absolute for one may be more conceptually "fliud" for another.

There are many such contridictions that are made in teaching and conveying information at different levels of complexity, although what I was taught is closer to "Rainman" and "Touch O' Death" I don't like to suggest someone is "wrong" as concepts often are contridictory and are usually "personalized." As long as they remain fuctional within the group they have validity. Mechanics are another story, but even they enjoy various degrees of functional correctness. Such is the case in human anatomy and in human interaction.

I also am intrigued by "Rainmans" statement, "... the stance is stomped into for structure with the aid of gravitational marriage and positive body position ...

Although we don't share terminology, it sounds like we may share some similar methodology and knowledge. I always think that is great.
 
R

rmcrobertson

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I agree. I too especially dislike to see people who don't cover out---especially when it's me.
 
K

kenpo12

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I was taught by Parker to use a series of mechanisms before and after the strike to come into moral and legal compliance with the level of the assault. First to mis-align, strike, takedown, and then control a finishing final counter-strike.

I was hoping you could be a little more specific. It just seems to me you don't have alot of time when someone is intent on taking you down.
 

Doc

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Originally posted by kenpo12
I was hoping you could be a little more specific. It just seems to me you don't have alot of time when someone is intent on taking you down.

Well sir the medium makes it difficult, but essentially when a person
"bear-hugs," the immediacy of the action creates a level of inertia and body mass that will impact the victim, and "bump" them causing them to move. Less than a tackle because the intent is different, but more than a "handshake."

This action can be used to initiate a mechanism that, once contact is made, will preclude the attacker from being aligned sufficiently to be able to push, pull, or lift. It is one of the many sub-category applications of the "slap-check" that I was taught by Parker to mis-align an attacker.

This comes under the area of the curriculum we called, "Surviving The Initial Assault," and the Psychology of Confrontation. From there we engage additional mechanisms to insure a stable base, as we "control" the attacker for an "Initial Retaliation." A stable base is given a high priority at the beginning of the assault. ANYTIME you step "backwards" you are off balance and mis-aligned, and must use mechnisms to correct your "Skeletal Alignment" to survive the constant forward pressure of a grappling attack, regardless of the degree. Even a "casual" hug a women might experience will knock you into a "Anatomical Inefficient Posture."

Describing striking is somewhat easier, but there is a reason judo, jiu-jitsu, aikido, and chin-na books are mostly pictures. These activities require "hands on" and siginificant physical interaction to grasp the concepts.

At this point I should remind you there are different methodologies for a "takedown." This technique attack is an initial front bear-hug. An attacker may decide later in the assault to take you down, but that is not the initial attack. If you learn your lesson well, (we teach it at yellow) you will prevent him from moving beyond the "Initial Assault Mechanism."
 
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