Sparring Range?

FearlessFreep

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I notice that in practice, me and my partners tend to set up at such a range that an attack would not land. We tend to need to do some sort of closing movement, a step-in or hop-to, to get within range to strike. Is this normal? Do you set up within striking range? I think as beginners it's a natural reaction to not want to be that close, but I think it would actually make sense to be close enough that a rear-leg technique would actually hit. It's sorta a high-risk/high-reward setup. "I'm close enough to hit you fast but you are close enough to hit me fast, too. Who flinches first? Who's faser?"
 

Miles

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Jay,

Footwork is the hallmark of WTF sparring. It is the delivery system which gets you into position to attack (or defend).

Do you perform drills in class doing "chun jin" (i.e. advance forward-same side), "who jin (i.e. move backward-same side), il bo chun jin (i.e. advance forward changing legs) and il bo who jin (i.e. move backward changing legs)? If you don't do these drills in class, you can work on them at home-no equipment needed (not even much space).

These drills are also excellent for conditioning. You start with the footwork, then start adding techniques such as a back leg round kick, or fast kick, block/punch combination, back kick, etc.

After you have the footwork and techniques down, you and a partner can do paddle drills with them. This builds speed and accuracy.

After paddles comes shield-work. At this stage, you can do drills countering your opponent's movements-forward/backward, diagonal, etc. Here you can work on putting lots of power into your technique.

After shields comes hogu drills. These drills also help you learn how to take a shot and to shift your weight so you don't get popped as hard.

After hogu drills comes free sparring....

Good luck!

Miles
 

TX_BB

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Freep,

In an official WTF match your seperated by 3 meters at the start of match or aanytime a major penalty is called. This distance is generally outside the range of all but eight footers.

Think (smile) the main risk you run with your thought is consciencness, especially if your opponent is larger, faster and more skilled.

That's why ideally you keep opponents out of reach until your ready to hit them or challange their defensive capability. Footwork is what seperates the good from the excellent or you from your opponent.
 

Shu2jack

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Depending on how you spar, staying out of range of attacks can be a good thing. One of the things I quickly learned is that I am not the fastest person out there. I counteract this by staying out of striking range both my opponent and myself because no matter how fast you are, the distance between us gives me enough time to react and counter. Same thing with stronger opponents. Your strength is negated if you can't hit me or if I can play the angles so your hits hurt less.

This usually turns the match into a chess game. Who feints better? Who has the better footwork? Who is better at reading an opponent? Who has better timing? So really, it is ok to spar outside of striking range. Just learn how to get into striking range or make your opponent strike at you when you are ready to score some points.
 
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FearlessFreep

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Well, I sak my Sabumnim the same question and he showed my that if I stand in range to throw a rear leg technique, it's pretty close, and I can get hit with a fast punch before I can get a kick off.

We do practice footwork quite a bit and I practice it on my own. One thing he really stresses is coming out of an attack in a stable and balance d position so that you can quickly a) move or b) launch another attack from a strong position

He's always getting on me when I slide step and am too 'heavy', pointing out that it makes me unstable and therefore vulnerable
 

TX_BB

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Hey Freep,

Try calf raises to help you develope the glide. If you hit 100 single leg calf raises you'll be near the strength nessecarry to last a class.(100 reps/1 set). Work with a jump rope and plyometerics will help.
 
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FearlessFreep

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Actually, TX_BB, I work with jump rope quite a bit, as well as some plyometric leg exercised, and, when I concentrate, I can glide pretty well, compared to my peers. My problem is focus. I don't do it automatically yet and when I don't remember to stay light, I get heavy footed. I pracitice a lot of 'glide in off angle' counters, etc (in out, 90 and 45 degree angles). Like I said, though, I'm stil inexperienced enough that it's just not an natural. automatic thing to stay light and balanced. My calfs and thighs are pretty strong and getting stronger, I just need to glide a few thousand more times untl it becomes second nature
 

Miles

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Jay,

Sounds like you have some good feedback both from MT and your instructor.

I remember training with a friend (TX BB-Master Shinn from Okemos) who said to practice bouncing footwork more than kicking. Kind of a radical idea I thought at the time.

Miles
 
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FearlessFreep

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Sounds like you have some good feedback both from MT and your instructor.


Yes, and I should've said "thanks" Some good stuff to think about and work on here.
 
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