Someone who does Taekwondo?

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andyjeffries

andyjeffries

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Ok....woke my wife up for this one. ha.ha.ha. She is unaware of the term of Takwondoin in proper Korean language. I mean proper meaning that sometimes there are terms used in Taekwondo that are related to TKD (slang if you will) and not to common Korean language.

If you were to refer to someone who does Taekwondo you would say Taekwondotaewayo (I think that is how you would spell it). 'In' may be an offshoot of 'jin' from the Japanese language which Glenn pointed out. 'Saram' usually mean person (Example Miguksaram=America person).

Interesting. Given that it's not an everyday Korean word, I wonder if there are any native Korean Taekwondoin on here that know the history of the term?

Even using 'in' as in Taekwondoin you would not use it in a plural since like Taekwondoins, as there are no plural words in Korean language. You don't say Doboks isseyo? (Do you have dobok?) You would just say Dobok isseyo?

I absolutely agree (hence why I said I'm a stickler for it), but I wondered if others do use plurals with Korean words. From what Puunui said, some people do...
 

Daniel Sullivan

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Okay, I believe that 'in' may be a variation of a Japanese reading of the hanja. The first time that I heard the term 'in' was on a kumdo forum; kumdoin. Most everyone used it and there were many Koreans and Korean speakers. Type kendo person into a translator and you get kendo-jin. The kanji is 剣道人. The last character is person, which is saram in Korean.

I am supposing (completely extrapolation on my part) that the suffix came into vogue during the occupation and simply stuck around. It is, after all, easy to say.

That is the best that I can come up with, and my level of scholarship in this area is relatively low, so if someone else has a more correct explanation, feel free to correct me.

Daniel
 

puunui

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Okay, I believe that 'in' may be a variation of a Japanese reading of the hanja. The first time that I heard the term 'in' was on a kumdo forum; kumdoin. Most everyone used it and there were many Koreans and Korean speakers. Type kendo person into a translator and you get kendo-jin. The kanji is 剣道人. The last character is person, which is saram in Korean.


The last character, the one that looks like a tent, is pronounced saram or in, depending on the context.
 

puunui

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So in the context of 'taekwondo person,' would in or saram, or something else, be correct? Daniel


I hear and read Taekwondoin all the time; I never hear or read Taekwondo saram. So I would say Taekwondoin.
 

miguksaram

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I hear and read Taekwondoin all the time; I never hear or read Taekwondo saram. So I would say Taekwondoin.
Yes the last symbol is 'saram' or person. 'In' is most likely derived from Japanese 'jin' as you pointed out before.

What would be interesting is to hear from people who take Taekkyon or Sirum or other Korean born arts to see if they use the term 'in'. Perhaps since, TKD and Kumdo are derived from Japanese arts that is why they refer to 'in'.
 

puunui

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Yes the last symbol is 'saram' or person. 'In' is most likely derived from Japanese 'jin' as you pointed out before.


I've been looking all over the house for my Japanese kanji dictionary, so I can look up the character for Ka in Karateka. I'm wondering if it is the same character for jin.
 

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I've been looking all over the house for my Japanese kanji dictionary, so I can look up the character for Ka in Karateka. I'm wondering if it is the same character for jin.
No, assuming that karate, judo, and aikido use the same 'ka' as kendo. Kendoka: 剣道家. I know translators are not always the best for this, but when I plug that into google tranlate, I get geomdoga 검도가.

Generally, kendoka is used to describe someone who is more than just a practitioner or competitor and usually who functions in something resembling a professinal capacity, such as an instructor, coach, or club owner. The term used for a general kendo practitioner is actually kenshi 剣士, which is swordsman.

Daniel
 

puunui

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No, assuming that karate, judo, and aikido use the same 'ka' as kendo. Kendoka: 剣道家. I know translators are not always the best for this, but when I plug that into google tranlate, I get geomdoga 검도가.

Generally, kendoka is used to describe someone who is more than just a practitioner or competitor and usually who functions in something resembling a professinal capacity, such as an instructor, coach, or club owner. The term used for a general kendo practitioner is actually kenshi 剣士, which is swordsman.

Daniel

Thanks for the explanation. Off topic, but I recently purchased this awesome book on the history of kendo. It is written in both japanese and english, and the author is american or british. For example, I thought the shinai was a relatively recent innovation, but the book explains that it has been around for hundreds of years. Things like that. The book is changing my view of kendo and its development.
 

miguksaram

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Thanks for the explanation. Off topic, but I recently purchased this awesome book on the history of kendo. It is written in both japanese and english, and the author is american or british. For example, I thought the shinai was a relatively recent innovation, but the book explains that it has been around for hundreds of years. Things like that. The book is changing my view of kendo and its development.
What is the name of the book?
 

Daniel Sullivan

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Thanks for the explanation. Off topic, but I recently purchased this awesome book on the history of kendo. It is written in both japanese and english, and the author is american or british. For example, I thought the shinai was a relatively recent innovation, but the book explains that it has been around for hundreds of years. Things like that. The book is changing my view of kendo and its development.
Don't keep us in suspense! What is the name and who is the author?

Daniel
 

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