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marlon

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Most kempo blocks when stepping forwards should be soft, and when stepping back should be hard.
soft is followed by hard - striking
hard is followed by soft - msk manipulation.
imo
 

Inkspill

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my opinion is that you should fit the situation, bearing in mind the 8 considerations. this is the most logical. to dictate that bucking action should be used when stepping back and riding action when stepping forward does not make sense, especially considering adjustments, there is no reason to contradict our adjustment principle with this restriction.

calming the storm, dance of death, thundering hammers, aggressive twins, striking serpent's head, triggered salute.

heck, look at deflecting hammer and thrusting salute, look at the why's, and the result of the respective blocks. the situation dictates, and the martial artist expresses themselves in their way to fit the situation.
 
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marlon

marlon

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and your opinion and experience is?
I would love a good discussion on technical aspects and fighting considerations focusing on blocking
 

MJS

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Most kempo blocks when stepping forwards should be soft, and when stepping back should be hard.
soft is followed by hard - striking
hard is followed by soft - msk manipulation.
imo

I'm pretty much in agreement with the stepping back. But, there are many techs in which you're going forward and its still a hard block, vs a softer block (parry)

As for the rest...I think that may vary from tech to tech, unless the person doing the defense changes things up to suit their preference.
 

K831

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Most kempo blocks when stepping forwards should be soft, and when stepping back should be hard.
soft is followed by hard - striking
hard is followed by soft - msk manipulation.
imo

1.) Hard or soft matters less than keeping forward energy. Regardless of the direction you are moving, your energy should always be moving forward and engaged.

2.) I don't think you should step/move back at all. Either move forward, or step off the x and take an angle. Moving straight back will get you run over, whether your block is hard or soft.

3.) Is there really such a thing as a "block" in Kenpo? Aren't they all strikes?
 

Touch Of Death

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1.) Hard or soft matters less than keeping forward energy. Regardless of the direction you are moving, your energy should always be moving forward and engaged.

2.) I don't think you should step/move back at all. Either move forward, or step off the x and take an angle. Moving straight back will get you run over, whether your block is hard or soft.

3.) Is there really such a thing as a "block" in Kenpo? Aren't they all strikes?
Thats what I was thinking. I can imagine blocking a roundhouse kick being a soft block; because, you are attempting to lessen the force with multiple points of contact rather than using a pin point effect.
Sean
 
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marlon

marlon

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We have some techniques that step straight back. Starting with the hard block (and follow up) the attackers forward motion is disrupted. A hard block while moving forward will also do this quite well. Since we emphasize striking through the center line and blocking occurs peripherally, then the arresting effect of the block creates something that I look at as a bit of waste. No offense, this is just my opinion and I have been wrong several times before. When I am moving forward to counter an attack I prefer that the attacker runs into my strikes as much as possible (I include stepping off center but still forward in this category). If I give their body a signal to stop it's forward attack then I loose some of this or need to extend myself in a manner that can create more vulnerability. It is part of how we train to fight. Please continue to share your differing experience and opinions

Respectfully,
Marlon
 
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marlon

marlon

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1.)
3.) Is there really such a thing as a "block" in Kenpo? Aren't they all strikes?

I would say that they can all be strikes and not necessarily that they are all strikes, in the style of kempo I teach which has more of a yin yang / taiji approach than some others

Respectfully,
Marlon
 

Inkspill

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We have some techniques that step straight back. Starting with the hard block (and follow up) the attackers forward motion is disrupted. A hard block while moving forward will also do this quite well. Since we emphasize striking through the center line and blocking occurs peripherally, then the arresting effect of the block creates something that I look at as a bit of waste. No offense, this is just my opinion and I have been wrong several times before. When I am moving forward to counter an attack I prefer that the attacker runs into my strikes as much as possible (I include stepping off center but still forward in this category). If I give their body a signal to stop it's forward attack then I loose some of this or need to extend myself in a manner that can create more vulnerability. It is part of how we train to fight. Please continue to share your differing experience and opinions

Respectfully,
Marlon


You don't think the attacker runs into your strike in, say, alternating maces?
 
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marlon

marlon

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Just to clarify. I am an shaolin kempo guy with enough familiarity about AK to know that I do not know it

Respectfully,
Marlon
 
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