Siu Lim Tau Comparison

I wasn't in the yahoo groups. I joined the WCML in about 1993/4 and it was already well established. Marty Goldberg, Rene Richie and some others were the moderators.
 
It depends on whether you know what you try to develop. In no one can say that everyone else is mistaken - as soon as they follow the Wing Chun principles and know what they are doing. Siu lim tao DOES NOT teach applications, but concepts!
This is a deep explanation of Siu Lim Tao - proving that it has to do with concepts. (Best analysis in Youtube up to now as far as i have seen).
 
This is a deep explanation of Siu Lim Tao - proving that it has to do with concepts. (Best analysis in Youtube up to now as far as i have seen).
Thanks for sharing.

It seems like the information was picked up from several different WSLVT sources, as opposed to coming from WSL himself. Is this your video?
 
Thanks for sharing.

It seems like the information was picked up from several different WSLVT sources, as opposed to coming from WSL himself. Is this your video?
Exactly: 3 lineages of WSL crosschecked, so as to end up in what WSL was teaching.
 
Exactly: 3 lineages of WSL crosschecked, so as to end up in what WSL was teaching.
Well not exactly what WSL was teaching, but you're on the right track!

I can certainly spot a few different WSLVT interpretations. Fung Hao, for example isn't used a lot in WSLVT, and wasn't really taught that much by WSL, so I'm guessing that you picked that up from Sifu Gary Lam. I would be interested to hear more about who your WSLVT influences are, and who you personally trained with.

Most of the first generation WSLVT practitioners spoke Cantonese; but as WSL's popularity increased, non-native speakers eventually became students as well. Those that were fortunate enough to have first-hand experiences with him either learned by speaking Cantonese or they had an interpreter. In my opinion, a lot of what WSL was teaching has been lost in translation over the years.

To add to your explanation of the wrist movement @19:00 in the video, WSL actually described it as simply covering from a low position to a high position as quickly as possible. He is recorded in Cantonese saying that the idea is about replacing the hands, much like what the last section of SNT teaches us in WSLVT as well. The concept is not to use the wrist to hit, it is to simply get your hand back up to recover from a low position. If you were to hit something when going back up, it would only be an incoming attacking hand. WSL never taught that section as a hit with the wrist to any part of the body.

Good video overall, keep it up!
 
Well not exactly what WSL was teaching, but you're on the right track!

I can certainly spot a few different WSLVT interpretations. Fung Hao, for example isn't used a lot in WSLVT, and wasn't really taught that much by WSL, so I'm guessing that you picked that up from Sifu Gary Lam. I would be interested to hear more about who your WSLVT influences are, and who you personally trained with.

Most of the first generation WSLVT practitioners spoke Cantonese; but as WSL's popularity increased, non-native speakers eventually became students as well. Those that were fortunate enough to have first-hand experiences with him either learned by speaking Cantonese or they had an interpreter. In my opinion, a lot of what WSL was teaching has been lost in translation over the years.

To add to your explanation of the wrist movement @19:00 in the video, WSL actually described it as simply covering from a low position to a high position as quickly as possible. He is recorded in Cantonese saying that the idea is about replacing the hands, much like what the last section of SNT teaches us in WSLVT as well. The concept is not to use the wrist to hit, it is to simply get your hand back up to recover from a low position. If you were to hit something when going back up, it would only be an incoming attacking hand. WSL never taught that section as a hit with the wrist to any part of the body.

Good video overall, keep it up!

What you say is definitely very useful and thank you. In the video it is not me, but one who teached me for quite long. I have heard some of what you say, also from him. His lineages were Nino Bernardo, Gary Lam (you are correct) and Ph. Beyer. About the wrist, yes i heard the same from him (maybe the 2 lineages said the same) but the third lineage gave also this option - so he said also this option. You seem to have also quite deep knowledge.
 

Latest Discussions

Back
Top