Shadowboxing/sparring by myself ..?

jwU

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I realise hands on with a partner is the best way to practice sparring but my life schedule doesnt always allow this.

Any tips or ideas on training by myself for sparring/shadowboxing?

I seem to lack ideas for combos and the ones I did think up ...well...when I tried them they werent that great. This is probally due to the execution and footwork which as always need work..

but any pointers or ideas would be most welcome, especially for developing effectice combos.
 

kaizasosei

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You have to keep at it. All feedback is good feedback.
Visualization is an important part of martial arts training. Even when you are alone, there are many things to practice and learn if you focus and visualize performing moves and combos. Just copy moves until you can improvise.
 

jks9199

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Shadowboxing is an opportunity to experiment with putting series of techniques together. You need to combine stikes with footwork, footwork with kicks, and so on. Experiment and develop some combinations by themselves, then combine them in shadowboxing. Try them on the heavy bag or with pads, then work them on a partner. Finally, try them sparring. Each step will help you develop them; footwork that works great by itself may be a hinderance on the bag or be extraneous with an actual partner... and fail completely in sparring. Or work great -- once you've practiced it enough that it's fluid.

A few simple combinations, using shuffle or sliding steps to advance them follow. I'm going to use boxing terminology for convenience, and because it's the most generic description for punching. Note that they can be done from either foot leads. The combos:
1. Jab, cross, hook.
2. Jab, front kick, cross.
3. Roundhouse kick, opposite hand hook.

Again, all of these can be executed with shuffling steps to drive them forward, but experiment with other stepping.
 

MJS

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Shadowboxing is an opportunity to experiment with putting series of techniques together. You need to combine stikes with footwork, footwork with kicks, and so on. Experiment and develop some combinations by themselves, then combine them in shadowboxing. Try them on the heavy bag or with pads, then work them on a partner. Finally, try them sparring. Each step will help you develop them; footwork that works great by itself may be a hinderance on the bag or be extraneous with an actual partner... and fail completely in sparring. Or work great -- once you've practiced it enough that it's fluid.

A few simple combinations, using shuffle or sliding steps to advance them follow. I'm going to use boxing terminology for convenience, and because it's the most generic description for punching. Note that they can be done from either foot leads. The combos:
1. Jab, cross, hook.
2. Jab, front kick, cross.
3. Roundhouse kick, opposite hand hook.

Again, all of these can be executed with shuffling steps to drive them forward, but experiment with other stepping.

Great post! I might also suggest doing this in front of a mirror to keep an eye on proper form or possibly taping yourself and watching afterwards. :)
 

JBrainard

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For strait up boxing (with a heavy bag is best but you can shadow box as well) check out Bas Rutten's boxing cd. It's really good for improving your hand stikes and it's an awesome workout to boot.
~JB
 

bostonbomber

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I'm a TCMA guy, but I hope you don't mind me chiming in here.

I agree with kaizasosei that visualization is very important with shadow boxing. For effective combination moves I'd let your natural body flow dictate what to do next (the combos listed by jks9199 flow quite naturally).

As far as partner training being the best way to practice, I don't completely agree. Training with a partner is great for learning timing and how to close the gap. However training with a willing partner is nothing like being sucker punched by a guy who wants to steal your wallet. Also, since most of us don't want to beat the snot out of our partners, we hold back and pull our punches (even when using pads). Shadow boxing allows you to execute technique with full force, full extension (i.e., no pulling punches), and full speed.

I'm a firm believer that we will react in the street the same way we train in the gym. You practice too much holding back to not hurt your training partner then you may end up doing the same thing when you actually need to use your art!
 

bostonbomber

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Sorry, you mentioned you wanted to train for sparring. My previous comment was geared toward self-defense applications. I need to read posts more carefully!
 

zeeberex

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I realise hands on with a partner is the best way to practice sparring but my life schedule doesnt always allow this.

Any tips or ideas on training by myself for sparring/shadowboxing?

I seem to lack ideas for combos and the ones I did think up ...well...when I tried them they werent that great. This is probally due to the execution and footwork which as always need work..

but any pointers or ideas would be most welcome, especially for developing effectice combos.

How about a multiple, try something on a heavy bag and then in sparring, note the differences.
 
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jwU

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A few simple combinations, using shuffle or sliding steps to advance them follow. I'm going to use boxing terminology for convenience, and because it's the most generic description for punching. Note that they can be done from either foot leads. The combos:
1. Jab, cross, hook.
2. Jab, front kick, cross.
3. Roundhouse kick, opposite hand hook.

Again, all of these can be executed with shuffling steps to drive them forward, but experiment with other stepping.

So to put these to use in terms of kenpo hand techniques would I substitute each "punch" for a hand technique.

eg: the jab could be a back fist , the cross a different kind of strike and the hook a different kind of strike again.

I
 

jks9199

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So to put these to use in terms of kenpo hand techniques would I substitute each "punch" for a hand technique.

eg: the jab could be a back fist , the cross a different kind of strike and the hook a different kind of strike again.

I
That's the idea... but don't stop there. How many punches do you have? What connects naturally with what? Use shadowboxing as an opportunity to try combining them in different ways. Then try them with a partner to see how the combinations work against someone, or on a heavy bag or pads to see how well you can flow while delivering power... and so on.
 

Mark L

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Lots of good suggestions! When I work alone, I find I get the most value when I visualize the target (I imagine little, red cross-hairs superimposed on a really ugly bad guy), it's important to aim. I anticipate the reaction of the strikes (both when I hit and miss/get blocked) so my ranging and direction is engaged, and follow up, lots of times. Working to the air is dramatically different than banging the bag, I'd suggest you do both. Practicing defensive movements and counter-attack works, too.
 

seninoniwashi

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As many have said visualization is the key. I practice quite a bit on my own as I can only get time with my partner once every two weeks. What I find the most useful is blindfolding myself in an open area and visualizing a confrontation and how I'd deal with it. The blindfold makes it easier to pretend and visualize the opponent(s) while at the same time it builds excellent balance. It may be strange at first but once you get use to it and really get into it you may be surprised with how quick your mind acts to create the attacks you defend against and how riled up you can get. I put alot of emphasis on the open area for obvious safety reasons - I use my garage as I don't need my neighbors seeing me out in the backyard flailing around like a madman with a blindfold :ultracool
 

Mr.NGMA

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What I have done was to take a light stand and remove the shade. Turn on the light, and adjust it so I could see my shadow against a wall in my garage, or basement.

Every time I aimed at my shadow, I could visualize another person standing in from of me. It helped because every time I moved for a strike, my shadow would also move.






_________________________________________________________________
http://kenpoken.webs.com/
 

Scotty

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I would suggest envisioning fighting multiple opponents. This would seem to help you to visualize different techniques/scenarios to fight out from. Perhaps thinking of environmental situations could spark your imagination (fighting with your back to the wall, small hallway...etc). This seems to work for me.

Hope this helps.
 

Bill_Hunsicker

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I know that shadowboxing is hard for many of my students. I recommend they set up a video camera and then do their boxing drill. After looking at it, they can better see what they were doing that looked weird. Also I tell them that (for the most part) it should be obvious what they are defending against just by watching the defense. That will help train the visualization that many dont seem to have up front.

Hope it helps.

Oss
 
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