Recommendations or comments on round, wood nunchucks please

Old Iowa Man

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I would appreciate any recommendations or comments on round, wood nunchucks please - I'll start with foam and have no instructor - There are SO many I figured you folks could save me some time - $25.00 or less price range - Thanks much:wavey:
 

Grenadier

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Cheap weapons are going to give you the same problems, no matter what the weapon may be.

Cheap nunchaku (25 dollar range) might not be well-balanced, and the wood they use will not be a durable one at all. Most of the time, you'll get a highly porous type of red oak (not the good kind of red oak) that will often be finished with wood putty, and covered with varnish / paint.

Learning on a pair like these can teach you terrible technique, and most likely, you'll simply end up throwing them away.


If you're dead set on getting a pair, then you may as well get something that you know will not be a limiting factor. Pam over at Crane Mountain, sells some very nice ones, custom made to your specs, and at a reasonable price:

Nunchaku

They do a great job, and have polished brass inserts that minimize cord wear. You can get a pair made out of hickory at a reasonable price (best to call and ask).


Above all, though, try to get some sort of formalized training with them, even if it means traveling a reasonable distance even for a seminar or two. It's actually more difficult to unlearn flawed mechanics, than it is to learn good ones from the start.
 
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Old Iowa Man

Old Iowa Man

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Cheap weapons are going to give you the same problems, no matter what the weapon may be.

Cheap nunchaku (25 dollar range) might not be well-balanced, and the wood they use will not be a durable one at all. Most of the time, you'll get a highly porous type of red oak (not the good kind of red oak) that will often be finished with wood putty, and covered with varnish / paint.

Learning on a pair like these can teach you terrible technique, and most likely, you'll simply end up throwing them away.


If you're dead set on getting a pair, then you may as well get something that you know will not be a limiting factor. Pam over at Crane Mountain, sells some very nice ones, custom made to your specs, and at a reasonable price:

Nunchaku

They do a great job, and have polished brass inserts that minimize cord wear. You can get a pair made out of hickory at a reasonable price (best to call and ask).


Above all, though, try to get some sort of formalized training with them, even if it means traveling a reasonable distance even for a seminar or two. It's actually more difficult to unlearn flawed mechanics, than it is to learn good ones from the start.

Thanks for yourinput and I'll check out the chucks you mention - Unfortunates I cannot travel due to health reasons - OIM
 

donald1

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im going to agree with grenadier

one thing for certain on round nunchaku is it would be better than the ones with edges like hexagon (or whatever shape its in), because the circle one is less likely to chip on edges


if you ever want to practice with wood nunchaku, be sure to have the stuff well. the foam ones are good for practice. (i cant count how many times ive hit funny bone or fingertips with wooden pair) i can almost feel the pain in my fingertips just thinking about it...

best of luck
 

donald1

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probably $30, $40? its not much higher for decent ones (it depends on what wood you get, chain or rope, and stuff like that)
 

Tony Dismukes

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What are you wanting the nunchaku for in the first place?

If it's for use as a self-defense weapon, forget it. There are other options which are more effective as well as being easier and safer to learn.
If it's part of training in a traditional martial art which includes their use, then wait until you can find instruction.
If it's for your own amusement, because you want to learn the fun spinning actions like a Bruce Lee movie (and who doesn't), then pretty much any set of chuks that looks good to you and fits your budget will do fine. It's pretty much the manly equivalent of a learning to spin a majorette's baton anyway.
 

donald1

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What are you wanting the nunchaku for in the first place?

If it's for use as a self-defense weapon, forget it. There are other options which are more effective as well as being easier and safer to learn.
If it's part of training in a traditional martial art which includes their use, then wait until you can find instruction.
If it's for your own amusement, because you want to learn the fun spinning actions like a Bruce Lee movie (and who doesn't), then pretty much any set of chuks that looks good to you and fits your budget will do fine. It's pretty much the manly equivalent of a learning to spin a majorette's baton anyway.

i agree with tony, its important to know the reason (they make nunchaku for different reasons) sometimes you see nunchaku that look amazing, absolutely gorgeous but are only good for showing, they got types that are harder wood or thicker good for sparing, and some in between that look good demonstrating forms but do not go well in sparing situations. i myself like hickory wood for sparring, purple heart wood looks wonderful but i would mainly use that type for 1-man forms (i cant remember if it was oak or cedar or was it pine...) i know at least one of those is a good starter wood for first wooden nunchaku
 
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Old Iowa Man

Old Iowa Man

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i agree with tony, its important to know the reason (they make nunchaku for different reasons) sometimes you see nunchaku that look amazing, absolutely gorgeous but are only good for showing, they got types that are harder wood or thicker good for sparing, and some in between that look good demonstrating forms but do not go well in sparing situations. i myself like hickory wood for sparring, purple heart wood looks wonderful but i would mainly use that type for 1-man forms (i cant remember if it was oak or cedar or was it pine...) i know at least one of those is a good starter wood for first wooden nunchaku

Like I said - Thanks to all of you for your help but I've given up on the idea of getting any nunchucks - OIM
 

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I have a set with Chain and ball bearing that I really dislike using. The hardware is hell on my hands. I prefer the corded kind if you can find them.
 

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