question on footwork and tape

hma123

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jun 30, 2009
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
I know what to do and how a "+" helps you on the ground with your footwork. But i also seen wierd or other "shapes" with tape on the ground, not used but pictures and other stuff. Anyone know any others ways to put tape on the ground to help footwork out
 

jks9199

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
23,507
Reaction score
3,852
Location
Northern VA
Not sure what "other" shapes you're asking about. There are lots of different geometric patterns to underlie the relationship and directions of movement. For example, an asterisk or star shows 9 directions you can move. Straight forward & back, diagonal forward and back on each side, straight to each side, and the center (twists, drops, and vertical jumps).
 
OP
H

hma123

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jun 30, 2009
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
Not sure what "other" shapes you're asking about. There are lots of different geometric patterns to underlie the relationship and directions of movement. For example, an asterisk or star shows 9 directions you can move. Straight forward & back, diagonal forward and back on each side, straight to each side, and the center (twists, drops, and vertical jumps).
Definetly getting somewhere, can you explain more on "stars" and explain what an asterisk is. And indetail what to do with them. THANKS!!
 

David43515

Master Black Belt
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
1,383
Reaction score
50
Location
Sapporo, Japan
An asterix is a star-shaped mark with eight points radiating out from the center. It`s probably on one of the buttons on your phone.

As for how to use it, lay one out on the floor like you would with your '+' patern and do the same stepping you did before. Now add movment on the 45 degree angles.

Most of the patterns you see in are just those 9 basic steps repeated in different combinations, directions, or starting with the opposite foot.
 

David43515

Master Black Belt
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
1,383
Reaction score
50
Location
Sapporo, Japan
Just noticed which forum this is in. You can pick up alot on your own just by trying your footwork out on the tape. But if you`re really interested in picking it up quickly, it`s a very very big part of Fillipino and Indonesian styles. Find a place in your area that teaches one of the following (Kali, Silat, Arnis, Escrima) and just ask them to help you with your footwork. They`ll probably give you what you`re looking for in one or two evenings and then it just comes down to practicing.

Arts that focus on blades, like the ones listed above, really push footwork because it`s too easy to get seriously hurt or killed if you ignore it.
 
OP
H

hma123

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jun 30, 2009
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
David43515 - thanks, i have an idea now on that pattern, and for the arts that base on good footwork.

Now does anyone else have anything maybe other then any kind of shapes? Some people know some stuff that alot of people dont know. Thanks to anyone that can help.
 

lklawson

Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
5,036
Reaction score
1,680
Location
Huber Heights, OH
Here's is a footwork POSITIONING diagram from Allanson-Winn's turn-of-the-century manual on Boxing.

picture.php


Related to what David was saying about stepping in 45 degree angles, here's pics from Billy Edwards' 1889 boxing manual. Though he names them "side steps" they are clearly on a 45.

picture.php


picture.php


Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

lklawson

Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
5,036
Reaction score
1,680
Location
Huber Heights, OH
Just noticed which forum this is in. You can pick up alot on your own just by trying your footwork out on the tape. But if you`re really interested in picking it up quickly, it`s a very very big part of Fillipino and Indonesian styles. Find a place in your area that teaches one of the following (Kali, Silat, Arnis, Escrima) and just ask them to help you with your footwork. They`ll probably give you what you`re looking for in one or two evenings and then it just comes down to practicing.

Arts that focus on blades, like the ones listed above, really push footwork because it`s too easy to get seriously hurt or killed if you ignore it.
Not just FMA and IMA. Japanese arts, European arts, etc. Look at the Spanish "Destreza" system for instance: http://www.martinez-destreza.com/articles/spanish1.htm or Tomiki Aikido's "Unsoku" http://www.londonaikido.com/static.php?page=unsoku and http://www.shodokanaikido.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/aikido/exercises_foot.html

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

jks9199

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
23,507
Reaction score
3,852
Location
Northern VA
Definetly getting somewhere, can you explain more on "stars" and explain what an asterisk is. And indetail what to do with them. THANKS!!
No, because some of this is stuff you need to be taught, not randomly inquire on the web.

Any "pattern" that underlies footwork is simply a tool to help the student visualize and guide their stepping to meet offensive or defensive needs. The use is limited only by the instructor's and student's imaginations. The angles and spaces help define the relationship between two fighters.
 
OP
H

hma123

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jun 30, 2009
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
lklawson - i dont really get what the top pic is showing. You mentioned its a foot positioning diagram, btu thats it, you just put your stance up in there? Any help with that
 

lklawson

Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
5,036
Reaction score
1,680
Location
Huber Heights, OH
lklawson - i dont really get what the top pic is showing. You mentioned its a foot positioning diagram, btu thats it, you just put your stance up in there? Any help with that
This is a "starting position for feet for both boxers" diagram from Allanson-Winn, circa 1915. All movement under his system (indeed all contemporary boxing systems) are predicated on boxers being in roughly this position as a starting poing. You can download the entire text as PDF for free from here: http://stores.lulu.com/lawson (don't let the "stores" thing fool you; the Allanson-Winn text is free to download).

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
OP
H

hma123

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jun 30, 2009
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
This is a "starting position for feet for both boxers" diagram from Allanson-Winn, circa 1915. All movement under his system (indeed all contemporary boxing systems) are predicated on boxers being in roughly this position as a starting poing. You can download the entire text as PDF for free from here: http://stores.lulu.com/lawson (don't let the "stores" thing fool you; the Allanson-Winn text is free to download).

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk

Interesting, thanks.
 

lklawson

Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
5,036
Reaction score
1,680
Location
Huber Heights, OH
It is important to note that the specific angle given for the placement of the rear foot makes side-stepping to both forward 45's easy. This would not be possible if the feet were positioned in a traditional fencing "90 degrees to each-other" stance or in an evenly weighted stance with both feet pointing forward and parallel to each other. It is also somewhat easier to move the front (left) foot to the forward right 45 (as shown in the first Edwards "Side Step" pic) from Allanson-Winn's position than it is to do so from a more modern stance with the rear (right) foot's heel cocked up off the ground.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
OP
H

hma123

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jun 30, 2009
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
13364.jpg
Something like this, looks like a diamond or square? What could i do or do you think this guy does with it. BTW it was a video, but it was teaching a striking defense, he just stepped on it, he didnt show what he used it with. But any help, would be good.
 

jks9199

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
23,507
Reaction score
3,852
Location
Northern VA
13364.jpg
Something like this, looks like a diamond or square? What could i do or do you think this guy does with it. BTW it was a video, but it was teaching a striking defense, he just stepped on it, he didnt show what he used it with. But any help, would be good.
He's practicing slipping, and to do so, he's staying "in the box." It could also be used while filming a video to show where you started and where you ended up... probably more cheaply and more accurately than having someone add in an effect after it was filmed. The size of the box also gives a clue as to how far apart your feet should be for the exercise...

Again -- the use is limited by your imagination.
 

David43515

Master Black Belt
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
1,383
Reaction score
50
Location
Sapporo, Japan
All the different shapes you see are just different combinations of the basic steps in the star: + and x. When you do a square, it`s just l and _ repeated. When you do a triangle it`s just /,\, and _ repeated. Diamonds are just /and\ repeated.

Just lay out an asterix on the floor with tape and begin standing in the center. Take a step in any direction along any line. NOW HERE`S THE IMPORTANT PART--remember you`re always at the center no matter how manyy steps you take, the center of the pattern moves with you. Begin with something simple. Take one step forward, bring feet together, and step either to your right or left. The do it backwards so you return to when you started. Next try a diaganal step followed by a right or a left. next begin taking two steps in one direction and then change directions.

Nobody can tell you in writing how to do it. You`ll have to play with it yourself, or find someone who does one of the styles mentioned who can show you what I`m talking about. Either way it just comes with practice. But footwork is king among the skills you practice. It adds power to your strikes, it makes it easier for you to hit your opponant and it makes it harder for him to land one on you.
 

Lee Mainprize

Orange Belt
Joined
Jun 23, 2011
Messages
69
Reaction score
0
my boxing coach had me doing something like this but with mats - they used tape to practice footwork - in a grid style format.
 
Top