Promotions!!

W

warriorsage

Guest
Hah! I tricked you all to checking out this thread, just to say that I worked very hard and have just been promoted to Martial Talk yellow belt. I rule all!!!

OK, since I feel guilty about making you all a victim to my ruse, I'll ask a serious question:

Do you ever put up students for testing without being certain they will pass? I've read many posts where people say they have never seen a student fail a test (and I haven't either), but I thought this could be attributed to the instructor only testing those who have already demonstrated a firm grasp on all the material. And in that case, why test? IS it more a demonstration for the testee's family and friends? A rite of passage? Something else?

Any thoughts?
 
In my school, we get tabs (tape of the belt color you'd be testing
for) on our belt when the instructor feels you're ready to test.
You're more than welcome to come and test, provided you've
completed the minimum amount of time in that grade. As far as
I know, no one has stepped to test without tabs. My instructor
has said that he's had to fail people before, but not too many,
because of the tab system. One guy is super talented, but his
nerves get the best of him during testing. He hasn't failed yet,
but he's sure come close (IMHO).
 
In the Dojo I'm a part of, we don't test for rank. When the instructor feels that you should be the next grade, you're given an evaluation. The evaluation isn't for his benefit, he sees what you do during training. It's scenarios that are put together (typically blindfolded) to show yourself where you are in your training...and in life as well. It's a wonderful and very difficult experiance.

When it's you being attacked by people blindfolded, all of the b.s. flies out the door and it's you at your core.
 
That sounds damn good. Not sure I like the method but the idea is great. I think that is the closest to how a ranking system should be operated that I have ever run across. That's my own opinion of course. But now I feel much better reading that.
:iws:
 
Originally posted by Jay Bell

In the Dojo I'm a part of, we don't test for rank. When the instructor feels that you should be the next grade, you're given an evaluation. The evaluation isn't for his benefit, he sees what you do during training. It's scenarios that are put together (typically blindfolded) to show yourself where you are in your training...and in life as well. It's a wonderful and very difficult experiance.

When it's you being attacked by people blindfolded, all of the b.s. flies out the door and it's you at your core.


WOW!!!!!! :eek: How long does the evaluation take? Is this
an EPAK school? If it is, then there's nothing that makes you
prove that you know the techs, stances or forms?
 
I think the testing is to see how you will do under pressure. The instructor knows if your ready for the next belt level or not based on working with you in class.

I have recomended that some students testing not pass. They just couldn't do the material when asked. Some were failed and some weren't. There was a young woman at our school that was testing for black belt that I worked out with the week prior and would have failed then. The day of the test she worked hard and kicked butt and passed that part. She couldn't pass the physical requirements however and has since quit.

If they can't do the requirements then they don't pass, otherwise you end up with McDojo's and students that couldn't beat their way out of a wet paper bag.

:asian:
 
Originally posted by Kirk
Is this an EPAK school? If it is, then there's nothing that makes you prove that you know the techs, stances or forms?

The EPAK curriculum is good. But don't cling so tightly to it. It's like a handful of sand, the harder you squeeze the less you'll retain. If you cup it loosely and pay attention to the things around you you'll keep a lot more.
 
Originally posted by GouRonin



The EPAK curriculum is good. But don't cling so tightly to it. It's like a handful of sand, the harder you squeeze the less you'll retain. If you cup it loosely and pay attention to the things around you you'll keep a lot more.

I'll definitely go with that, and my instructor encourages us to
learn things from other styles. We have stick and knife training
on the weekends, and he brings in jiusitsu guys, JKD guys,
etc .... but we don't test on any of this for promotion.
 
WOW!!!!!! How long does the evaluation take?

Normally about 5-10 minutes of being attacked

Is this an EPAK school?

EPAK? Erm...It's a Bujinkan school. :) I have no idea what EPAK is..

If it is, then there's nothing that makes you
prove that you know the techs, stances or forms?

Techniques, stances and the like are tested everytime you have training
 
Jay Bell posted:
"When it's you being attacked by people blindfolded, all of the b.s. flies out the door and it's you at your core."

Personally I'd rather be attacked by blindfolded people. :D

but seriously, what do you do about weapon attacks (I'm thinking about a stick/club here). Are you adept enough at blindfolded self defense that you can pick-up a person's presense far enough away to evade a club attack.

If so, well damn, I'm envious

Lamont
 
Originally posted by Jay Bell

EPAK? Erm...It's a Bujinkan school. I have no idea what EPAK is..

EPAK=Ed Parker's American Kenpo
 
Personally I'd rather be attacked by blindfolded people.

hehe you n' me both :D

but seriously, what do you do about weapon attacks (I'm thinking about a stick/club here). Are you adept enough at blindfolded self defense that you can pick-up a person's presense far enough away to evade a club attack.

It honestly depends on the level of training. Some evaluations involve weapons like tanto/kodachi and whatnot. Some are done with body grabs of various sorts, arm grabs, etc. The evaluations tend to be very individualistic and gear towards what that specific person needs to see inside of themself. It's a very uncomfortable experiance because your strengths are typically side-lined and limited through it all.
 
Whoa baby... This particular string is very relevant to where I am at right now, probably because I'm testing for my 3rd Degree Brown Belt tomorrow (Friday the 19th of April). I'm nervous as hell, and I haven't slept well for a couple of nights now.

One thing that intrigues me about this particular thread is the notion that very few people fail tests... and I know that this is true. The majority of my testing has taken place at Ed Parker's Karate Studio in Pasadena. Although I have seen people fail (not very often, but it does happen) the understanding of testing there, is that they wouldn't have you test if they didn't think you were ready. So for them it is a "right of passage". Thing is, I have switched schools, and I don't know how they conduct tests at Mr. Hawkins studio.

It has been close to three years since I tested for my Green Belt. I have been stuck at this rank for a while due to some problems that developed at the Pasadena Studio. My leaving the I.K.K.A. has taken a toll on me over the past couple of years, but under the guidance of several people (Frank Trejo, Charles Gonzales, Steve LaBounty, Dennis Conatser, and Clyde O'Briant) I have been able to sharpen my skills during that time. I have also come to the realization that my loyalty to Mr. Parker and his art cannot be questioned simply because of my departure from today's I.K.K.A. (I know this because I choose to train with his top students, and if he were alive today... they would definatley be at his right hand).

My switch to Bryan Hawkins Studio was recent. I've been there for about 2 months now. Since I've been there, alot of very positive things have happened for me:

#1. I have regained my self-confidence.

#2. When I started taking lessons there I weighed a whopping 265lbs., now I weight 240lbs. That's a healthy 25lb. loss in two months guys! (Note: I am 5ft 11in.)

#3. My interest in Kenpo has been re-ignited.

#4. I've been able to put the past behind me (not forgotten, but merely gotten over).

#5. I feel like I get as much out of the sudio, as I put into it.

I have literally fallen in love with Mr. Hawkins studio. I get a slight case of the gitters almost every time I go there. (Similar to the nervousness one may feel before going out on a date with a new girl friend.) I know that my nervousness will be extinguished through exposure and time, but I also know that in my heart the passion I have for Kenpo will continue to grow because of this place, and the people there.

I've known my 3rd Degree Brown Belt material for a while, and although I have performed some spit shining in certain areas over the course of the last two months... I feel like I am ready to progress to the next level. During the pre-test Mr. Hawkins asked me... "Billy, Where did you originally learn Long Form Three?". When I told him that I learned it from Frank Trejo he responded "That explains why it looked so good, becuase you looked just like him while you were doing it." Needless to say... I WAS FLATTERED!

Mr. Trejo has been like a father to me, and we remain close to this day. When I started taking lessons under him three years ago he completely renovated my Kenpo Arsenal. We started all the way over from Yellow belt and refined everything I know to this point. Although things have been rocky between us at times, I will never loose perspective on the influence he has had on my Kenpo.

One of the more surprising things to me is that Mr. Trejo supports my decision to train at Mr. Hawkins studio. Mr. Trejo has taught me alot during the past few years, and I know that if it weren't for him planting his foot in firmly my *** every so often... I wouldn't be as good as I am today.

Well I'd better get going because I've gotta get psyched for the "pain of birth" (this is really gunna hurt from what I hear)... I just hope that it's not false labor. LOL!

Sincerely,
Billy Lear, green-belt
United Kenpo Systems
www.uks-kenpo.com :asian:
 
Originally posted by WilliamTLear
I have literally fallen in love with Mr. Hawkins studio.

Well why don't you marry it?
:rolleyes:

Dude, be kewl. You'll do fine. Besides, all of us who matter already think you're a-ok.
 
Right of Passage... hmm... never thought of it that way before....

:)

Billy, relax. Take a few deep breaths, clear the mind (very easy for me :D) and just let the techniques flow. :)

Welcome to MartialTalk. :)

:asian:
 
Billy

I would say good luck, I already know you are going to do a great job so go out and enjoy the testing experience.
 
Good luck with your test William!! It sounds like you'll do fine.

I have my first kenpo test coming up next week and I'm a little nervous and I've been a TKD black belt for 15 years!

:asian:
 
I'm worried........ He won't make it....... I just know it........, Brian Hawkins is sooooooooo tough during tests....... Billy is sooooo nervous! He hasn't tested in 3 YEARS!, Oh gosh...... stomach knotted...... techniques running thru his head..... forms as well...... Will he be able to handle Howard's questions......... Oh My..... crossing fingers and toes, Will there be a large board of Black Belts watching...... breathing fast...... oh..... geeeeee the pain.... the hemorrhoids..... I cant take it........ will he wear that elusive brown..... with one stripe yet! wow.... no I cant sleep.......



Take a valium and mail in the 5 dollars.....

Good Testing BILLY!,

always in your corner.......
 
I'll let you know how everything turns out after the test...

AND A SPECIAL THANKS TO DENNIS!!! YOUR FRIENDSHIP IS VERY IMPORTANT TO ME... AS ARE YOUR STIRRING COMMENTS ABOUT MY ANXIETY OVER TOMORROW... YOU ARE SOOOOO CLOSE TO THE TRUTH (LAUGHING AT IT AGAIN!!!)

Take Care,
Billy Lear
 

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