Point Sparring Kick

jks9199

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How would you deem any strike crippling or disabling in a points fight, is that the verbiage of the rules or does it require only a firm landing?

Generally speaking, in a point tournament setting, the rules I'm familiar with look for a strike (punch or kick) delivered with focus, balance, and sound body mechanics, but controlled so that, were it delivered with full power, it would have done injury. That includes a reasonable or appropriate target.
 

jezr74

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they wear pad under their tops that automatically registers if it's been hit with sufficient force (whatever that is) - they use them a lot in tkd tournaments too..........

That would make it fair game then right? Most sports will have tactics that are seen as less sportsman like.

But I guess it would have to be unanimous in the sports organization to deem it not in the good will of the sport.
 

drop bear

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Asking to judge a light contact competition on what could be seen as heavy contact would have to be an issue though.

I am not sure how you could do that and get it right.
 
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OldKarateGuy

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Some styles - JKA comes to mind - allow sweeps (but not necessarily throws, since grabbing may not be not allowed). The sweep itself counts for nothing, but you unbalance or knock the opponent down and then score while he/she is on the deck or falling. And no, you don't catch them or try to break the fall. Generally, that's their problem. It would probably discourage this kind of one-legged stuff, which would invite a sweep I think. This one-legged hopping also would seem to call for some hard blocks (knock-down or unbalance hard) were they allowed, but the evolution to less and less allowable contact is part of why we are seeing this stupid looking stuff in the first place. My sense is that we are creating something no longer a martial art but instead, something like a performance art, since it increasingly has no practical application.
 

Buka

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This is probably old fashioned of me, but if somebody threw those types of kicks my way, I'd either be amused or insulted. More than likely the latter.
 

tshadowchaser

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I am not a fan of any kicks or tournaments where the hands are always at the side not protecting the body/face.
No offense to anyone but the original post was from an ISKA tournament and ISKA seems to be more about show than actual martial arts
As has been said when people actually fought in tournaments sweeps, blocks, some times throws and punches where allowed and the kick in the viedo would have been met with something that made that kicker think about never doing that hoppy kick again
and for the answer to the original question : NO i do not think this kind of technique should ever be allow without the opponent being allow to counter with something devastating
 

donnaTKD

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they did this in muay thai competitions too -- they took out the throws and use of the head and outlawed some of the strikes too --- sort of defeats the object of the fight tbh..............

awudt muay boran stripped to make way for competitive muay thai.
 

Touch Of Death

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Some styles - JKA comes to mind - allow sweeps (but not necessarily throws, since grabbing may not be not allowed). The sweep itself counts for nothing, but you unbalance or knock the opponent down and then score while he/she is on the deck or falling. And no, you don't catch them or try to break the fall. Generally, that's their problem. It would probably discourage this kind of one-legged stuff, which would invite a sweep I think. This one-legged hopping also would seem to call for some hard blocks (knock-down or unbalance hard) were they allowed, but the evolution to less and less allowable contact is part of why we are seeing this stupid looking stuff in the first place. My sense is that we are creating something no longer a martial art but instead, something like a performance art, since it increasingly has no practical application.
You attitude is all well and good until some kids end up in the hospital with head injuries. :)
 

Tony Dismukes

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This sort of move is why when I do light-contact sparring I prefer to do it with people who have full-contact experience. The folks with full-contact experience know what real range is and what an effective strike looks like. They aren't bouncing around trying to play tag with ineffective techniques from out of range.
 

Stac3y

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This technique has a name: pump(ing) side kick. It's used to advance by sliding and meant to a) prevent the opponent from directly attacking (functioning almost as a block) and b) have the leg up and chambered to deliver a side kick. The power part of this is not the actual pump kick, it's the final part of the kick, the one that actually makes contact. At that point, the technique requires the hip to rotate and open (I tell my juniors to point their butts at the target), locking out the knee and thrusting the heel through the target. This is called "sticking" the kick. The power comes from the rotation of the hip and the push against the floor (that's poorly worded, but WTH) of the base foot. Sport karate fighters (and Chelsey Nash is one of the top women) in NASKA/ISKA are supposed to use light contact (little or no penetration) to the face and head, and light-moderate contact to the body, but if the sticking portion of the kick isn't pulled by softening the knee, you can break ribs very easily.

In essence, it's almost a distraction technique, allowing you to get set up for a good, strong side kick with hip rotation and a solid base. Of course, there are a lot of people who do it incorrectly, kicking with their bellies pointing forward, which is awkward and creates an ugly, weak kick.

That being said, I fight in this style, and I only pump once or twice, not over and over--just enough to close distance quickly and set up the offensive side kick. I love to fight people who pump a lot, because you can use your angles (someone up there said "circle them") to get around the leg, and it's hard to change direction quickly with one foot in the air. I also tend to go for economy of motion more--I'm old.

I will also say that a front leg side kick, delivered correctly, is hella powerful. Just check out old videos of Bill Wallace's full contact fights. I've kicked women who outweighed me by 50 pounds right out of the ring--this is Texas. A point in Texas is a felony anywhere else.
 
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