Physical recovery from smoking

JourneymanDave

White Belt
Joined
Jun 3, 2009
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
This goes out to everyone, but to ex-smokers in particular. I'm working on quitting smoking. I've smoked for about two years, up to about a pack a day.

I underwent surgery a while ago, that luckily doesn't affect me physically other than I put on some weight. I promised myself I wouldn't start up with MA classes until I got back to what I consider a reasonable level of fitness. The classes I go to are particularly demanding. So I need to be able to actually make it through the conditioning part of the class without dying
(I know the lessons would help, but I hang it over my head as a motivator more or less)

About how long am I looking in order to achieve any significant degree of recovery in the cardio endurance department?
 

clfsean

Senior Master
MT Mentor
MTS Alumni
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Messages
3,687
Reaction score
400
Location
Metropolitan Tokyo
This goes out to everyone, but to ex-smokers in particular. I'm working on quitting smoking. I've smoked for about two years, up to about a pack a day.

I underwent surgery a while ago, that luckily doesn't affect me physically other than I put on some weight. I promised myself I wouldn't start up with MA classes until I got back to what I consider a reasonable level of fitness. The classes I go to are particularly demanding. So I need to be able to actually make it through the conditioning part of the class without dying
(I know the lessons would help, but I hang it over my head as a motivator more or less)

About how long am I looking in order to achieve any significant degree of recovery in the cardio endurance department?

When did you quit totally? Take that & add about 1 year to it for pretty good results. In 2 you honestly won't notice & in 3 & more, you'll feel like you never did.
 

theletch1

Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Jan 21, 2003
Messages
8,073
Reaction score
170
Location
79 Wistful Vista
When did you quit totally? Take that & add about 1 year to it for pretty good results. In 2 you honestly won't notice & in 3 & more, you'll feel like you never did.
And in 10 (if I understand the literature correctly) your body will show no signs of ever having smoked at all.
 

clfsean

Senior Master
MT Mentor
MTS Alumni
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Messages
3,687
Reaction score
400
Location
Metropolitan Tokyo
And in 10 (if I understand the literature correctly) your body will show no signs of ever having smoked at all.

Really?? Cool... didn't know that. I thought there'd be some residuals... but that's cool.

Given traffic the way it is in most major cities though... who can tell?!? :D
 

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
15,673
Reaction score
4,538
Location
Michigan
And in 10 (if I understand the literature correctly) your body will show no signs of ever having smoked at all.

Not always true. I have scar tissue on my lungs from smoking (coughing). It does not go away, and I have permanently reduced lung capacity because of it. I smoked for just over 10 years, 2 packs a day. I did not have a 'smoker's cough' but sometimes woke up with those serious hack-up-a-lung coughs - that's what did it.
 

7starmarc

Green Belt
Joined
Jan 11, 2008
Messages
178
Reaction score
10
Location
Irvine, Ca
Not always true. I have scar tissue on my lungs from smoking (coughing). It does not go away, and I have permanently reduced lung capacity because of it. I smoked for just over 10 years, 2 packs a day. I did not have a 'smoker's cough' but sometimes woke up with those serious hack-up-a-lung coughs - that's what did it.

I agree. If you're lucky, you won't have significant residual. But this all depends on the amount of damage you've managed to do to your lungs during your smoking years. Emphysema doesn't always recover, lung cancer, if you get it, will always have an effect. Also, the risk of lung cancer remains for 10-20 years after quitting. After that time, you return to the normal risk in the population, but you are still at increased risk during that time period.

You're recovery of cardiopulmonary capacity will depend on a lot of other factors -- the rest of your health picture, the amount of damage you've done to your lungs, etc. If you really want to know, you should see a pulmonologist with some interest in sports science. Only they can measure your current capacities and make a prediction. Even this will be somewhat compromised by not knowing your pre-smoking baseline function.
 

Omar B

Senior Master
Joined
Nov 6, 2007
Messages
3,687
Reaction score
87
Location
Queens, NY. Fort Lauderdale, FL
I've not smoked since last summer but there was no appreciable difference either way. I've only smokes since college (stress smoker) and I still kept up my usually swimming and karate. Keep your head up and working hard man, it can be difficult for some people this soon after quitting.
 

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
15,673
Reaction score
4,538
Location
Michigan
I've not smoked since last summer but there was no appreciable difference either way. I've only smokes since college (stress smoker) and I still kept up my usually swimming and karate. Keep your head up and working hard man, it can be difficult for some people this soon after quitting.

I would wake up dreaming I was smoking even a year after I quit. I used to wake up tasting cigarettes in my mouth and certain I had just had one. The urges died down over time, but it took several years to completely subside.
 

BLACK LION

Black Belt
Joined
Aug 18, 2008
Messages
551
Reaction score
30
Location
CA
This goes out to everyone, but to ex-smokers in particular. I'm working on quitting smoking. I've smoked for about two years, up to about a pack a day.

I underwent surgery a while ago, that luckily doesn't affect me physically other than I put on some weight. I promised myself I wouldn't start up with MA classes until I got back to what I consider a reasonable level of fitness. The classes I go to are particularly demanding. So I need to be able to actually make it through the conditioning part of the class without dying
(I know the lessons would help, but I hang it over my head as a motivator more or less)

About how long am I looking in order to achieve any significant degree of recovery in the cardio endurance department?

Upon arrival to boot camp smoking was secured for the duration of the entire process. There was no choice in that matter. I coughed the crap out for about 2 weeks and then didnt feel any difference from before I started and after I quit. I finished first in all the PT and felt completley un affected while doing so...

I was placed on limited duty from a knee problem and didnt have to PT so I started up again. whenever I would do anything that required breathing heavy or an increased heart rate I felt it... I could not hold my breath as long as I used to and tired quicker than normal.... I started the quitting process again but this time I had to force myself rather than be forced...

I stop buying packs and bumming only lasts so long before people look at you like a bum... I would pay .25 cents to bum one and that even still, became a burden on those who bought thier packs... I would buy single cig or cigarillos and eventually got sick of the taste and the smell since I wasnt smoking as often... I eventually had to tell myself I hated them and they are killing me and everyone I saw smoking I would tell them I hated thier cigaretts and they are killing me... it wasnt long before I really hated them and still do to this day...

recovery wont be long since you have not been smoking long... you will cough it all out in a month or so and never look back....
 

Haze

Blue Belt
Joined
Jul 16, 2006
Messages
254
Reaction score
1
Location
Upstate NY
I smoked for 35 yrs. Trained to run 5 miles for my BB test and all that came with it while smoking 2 packs per day.

I quit 8 yrs ago and I am now just starting to feel the effects of the damage. Shortness of breath at times and diminished lung capacity. I still sit here at my PC and reach for a smoke at times.

As far as smoking, when the damage is done, it is done.
 

seasoned

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
11,253
Reaction score
1,232
Location
Lives in Texas
I smoked on and off all through the ranks, and got away with it. At the time, being young helped. I would drive down the road, get sick of my habit, throw the pack of smokes out the window, only to pull into the next store and pack up again. It wasn't until my Black Belt test that I decided to be all I could be, and also, not get my butt kicked by oxygen rich young guys, that I needed a life change. 40 years later, smoke free, but honestly, still from time to time thinking about it, I feel I have made it. What makes the difference with me is being able the wake up in the morning and take a breathe and not cough. Also keeping up with my younger wife helps give me the incentive to not look back. I'm not saying it will take 40 years, but after just a few I felt a lot better. The body has the ability to heal if given the proper nutrition and exercise. Good luck.
 

Tez3

Sr. Grandmaster
Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2006
Messages
27,608
Reaction score
4,901
Location
England
My daughter hasn't smoked for a few months now which is great, she said she had flu like symptoms for a week or so and coughing at first but that soon went. she used patches and said it's the best way to give up though the patches at night can give you weird dreams. She said it's much easier to give up with them though.
 

MJS

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2003
Messages
30,187
Reaction score
430
Location
Cromwell,CT
This goes out to everyone, but to ex-smokers in particular. I'm working on quitting smoking. I've smoked for about two years, up to about a pack a day.

I underwent surgery a while ago, that luckily doesn't affect me physically other than I put on some weight. I promised myself I wouldn't start up with MA classes until I got back to what I consider a reasonable level of fitness. The classes I go to are particularly demanding. So I need to be able to actually make it through the conditioning part of the class without dying
(I know the lessons would help, but I hang it over my head as a motivator more or less)

About how long am I looking in order to achieve any significant degree of recovery in the cardio endurance department?

First off, congrats to you for taking the steps in quitting. I'm not a smoker, however many of my family members are, and I know first hand, that its not easy. My Father was a smoker for many years. He eventually had developed some serious medical issues due to that, and was forced to pretty much quit cold. While there may be damage that is already there and unable to be fixed, by quitting, he's prevented any further damage.

How long will it take to get back to a high cardio level? Don't know, but I'd wager a guess that it'll depend on the person. For example, a guy who lives a few doors down from my parents smokes. However, he seems to have pretty good cardio despite that, as he works out regularly at the gym, runs and walks.
 

Drac

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Messages
22,738
Reaction score
143
Location
Ohio
This goes out to everyone, but to ex-smokers in particular. I'm working on quitting smoking. I've smoked for about two years, up to about a pack a day.

I underwent surgery a while ago, that luckily doesn't affect me physically other than I put on some weight. I promised myself I wouldn't start up with MA classes until I got back to what I consider a reasonable level of fitness. The classes I go to are particularly demanding. So I need to be able to actually make it through the conditioning part of the class without dying
(I know the lessons would help, but I hang it over my head as a motivator more or less)

About how long am I looking in order to achieve any significant degree of recovery in the cardio endurance department?

The BEST of luck to you...I quit for 2 years and gained about 60 lbs..
 

Guardian

Black Belt
Joined
Nov 11, 2007
Messages
635
Reaction score
23
Location
Wichita Falls, Texas
I'm glad to see all the ex-smokers also. I layed them down after 29 years of smoking 105 days ago and haven't looked back. The 1st 35 days was hell, then it just started going away, I didn't care to have, I didn't mind people smoking around me (though I tried to stay from it for the most part), don't temp temptation to much LOL). My grumps went away, my wife is thankful for that, back to my old self. The folks who work for me and with me are thankful also LOL.

Your lungs will take time to heal as long as you have not damaged them permanently, your Doctor can check that out thoroughly for you though, give it about 3 months and go see him/her and they'll let you know when to come back.

If you stay off the habit, in 5 years, you will have no more of a chance of getting lung cancer then someone who never smoked.

I still have shortness of breath now and then, but my smokers cough is gone, my allergies only act up here and there now. My weight went up by 24lbs, but I've lost 6 of that already, so you can do it, everything taste and smells better, but take it in increments my friend, the weight doesn't have to come on like gang busters. Moderation can be done.

 
OP
J

JourneymanDave

White Belt
Joined
Jun 3, 2009
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
man, I don't know if im just backwards or not, but I actually gained weight while smoking and have started losing after quitting.

Maybe my cardio will start getting worse now! Ha! I doubt it though
 

Latest Discussions

Top