Okinawan weapons advice

MBuzzy

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I have an opportunity to attend a weapons camp during which you may focus on one of these weapons: Sai, Tonfa, Nunchaku, Gusan, or Kama. I am by training a KMA stylist, but I would really like to learn at least one of these weapons. So as someone who only has training in Korean Sword, what would be your recommendation for a good weapon to learn? Any comments or suggestsions are welcome. Thank you!
 

cstanley

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The bo is such a fundamental weapon I think I would start there. If there is no bo training available, I think I would choose tonfa.
 

arnisador

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I imagine you'd find the Sai, Nunchaku, or Kama the most different from what you're used to, which might be interesting! I'd recommend the Sai.
 

Doc_Jude

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I'd recommend any of the Kobudo stick work (bo, gusan, nitanbo, eku, etc) is great for practicality, sai is really fun since there are tons of variety in application.
 

searcher

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IMO-the sai will complement your training quite nicely. They were often carried as a backup by many sword carrying lawmen. You will find that many of the principles of each weapon cross over from one to the other.

But it will ultimately come down to what you want.
 

Grenadier

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I'm a bit biased, since my kobudo training is focused on bo and sai, but I think you would really enjoy working with the sai. It requires a bit more fine motor coordination, but this is something that almost anyone can develop, with enough practice.

The sai will offer you a different view on "short" weapons, since both ends of the weapon can be used to strike, and that you can get some really rapid movements going with a decent pair and some good skill. They truly become an extension of your own hand.

Furthermore, you can get some really nice flowing techniques going, and that getting the sai to flow will help you learn to relax better.
 

cstanley

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Has anyone used the Kama? What are you opinions on it?

My opinion is that kama are very sharp and should be taught and learned carefully...oh, unless you want to buy some of those kama with dull blades to whirl over your head in tournaments. No danger there...no kobudo, either.:)
 

searcher

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Has anyone used the Kama? What are you opinions on it?


Yes, I train them as a regular part of my kobudo training. I think they take alot of time and can be extremely dangerous. IMO-stay away from them at seminars.
 

Andrew Green

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My opinion is that kama are very sharp and should be taught and learned carefully...oh, unless you want to buy some of those kama with dull blades to whirl over your head in tournaments. No danger there...no kobudo, either.:)


Training weapons should always be dull. No matter how careful you are, eventually a accident will happen.

Besides, if you are being overly careful, then you are missing a lot as well, you can't train two person exercises, especially not with any amount of intent or commitment. This is the reason things like boken and shinai exist ;)

And to answer the question, does the instructor have a speciality? If so go with that, always best to have an instructor teach you what they are most interested in themself.

But if you really got nothing to go one and no preference, then the Bo is the standard starting point in Kobudo, usually followed by the sai. On the other hand, finding people that can use a bo is pretty easy...
 

cstanley

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Training weapons should always be dull. No matter how careful you are, eventually a accident will happen.

Besides, if you are being overly careful, then you are missing a lot as well, you can't train two person exercises, especially not with any amount of intent or commitment. This is the reason things like boken and shinai exist ;)

And to answer the question, does the instructor have a speciality? If so go with that, always best to have an instructor teach you what they are most interested in themself.

But if you really got nothing to go one and no preference, then the Bo is the standard starting point in Kobudo, usually followed by the sai. On the other hand, finding people that can use a bo is pretty easy...

My experience has been that most traditional ryu teach with sharp weapons only when the student has enough seniority to learn. Toy weapons for toy martial artists.
 

Noah_Legel

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Personally, I would suggest sai. I am sure that everyone has his or her own opinion on which weapon is the best and when to learn which one, but given that this is a seminar, and you will not be able to constantly work what you learn under the instruction of a trained kobudo instructor, I would suggest that you learn sai, as it is generally considered the most basic weapon after bo. Gusan, which would be a jo staff, roughly, would seem more basic, but is is going to function somewhere in between the way a katana would be used and the way a bo staff would be used, and using a weapon in such a way is very technical and requires a lot of instruction.
 

NDNgirl4ever

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I'd recommend learning the bo, because it's practical for defense (you can use broom handles or pool cues if you don't have an actual bo), or the nunchaku because they are a lot of fun in my opinion.
 
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MBuzzy

MBuzzy

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I'm down to either Bo or Sai....just have to narrow down from there. At that point, it may come to the cost of the weapon!
 

harlan

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Wow...I totally missed the aspect that you might have to make a purchase before the seminar. I'd stick with bo, or borrow a pair of sai for the event. If you get into it, you might want to try getting your hands on different sai (makers, type, length, etc.) before committing to a purchase.
 

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