Your Favorite Traditional Weapon

MJS

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There are many out there, such as the Bo, Kama, Sai, and Tonfa to name a few. Which one(s) do you prefer to work with? If you've competed with any of these, which did you use?

Out of all of them, I've mainly focused on the bo and sai. While many of these weapons would probably land you in jail if you carried them around, the bo is probably the most practical, due to the fact that a long pole or broom stick handle can be improvised.

Mike
 

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bobster_ice said:
My personal favourate has to be the kama, it kicks *** and you can cut through almost anything.

??? Have you ever tried cutting anything substantial with one?

Lamont
 

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Favorite? Single edged, single handed edged weapon. You could call it a cavalry saber or a dao or a pinute/tenegre/ginunting or a machete. Don't much matter to me.

Lamont
 

beau_safken

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For pure beauty, go to a asian art museum and look for the Kris knives. The folded steel reflects the depth of detail and the curves of the blade are just to be awed at. Not to mention the adornment of the sheath's are enough to make any blade lover take a step back. They are pure beauty.
 
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MJS

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bobster_ice said:
Yeah, it can cut through almost anything, well except for metal of course.

I think he was looking to see what you've actually cut with one.

Mike
 

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bobster_ice said:
Yeah, it can cut through almost anything, well except for metal of course.

Does it cut better than other bladed weapons, if so, why?

Lamont
 

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bobster_ice said:
No, it dosnt.

In fact the kama is a pretty poor design for cutting much except for the rice stalks that it was originally intended. As a combat weapon it is much more of a thrusting implement than for cutting.

I'd also like to point out that even bladed weapons strictly designed for war are not capable of "cutting through just about anything."

Lamont
 

beau_safken

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No offense but even swords are made for slashing and breaking bones. Not the way all the movies and such make it out that its all lightsaber like. With all the armor that was worn in the old days, the sword was more of less a way of breaking bones and slashing to cause casualties not actually killing a person. Course, thats a pretty broad idea but i'm sure you all get the idea.

A kama...that really is a poor weapon. The point were all the force is concentrated is in the connection between the blade and stick part. I'm sure it would be sweet if you went liger hunting...sweet...
 

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Blindside said:
In fact the kama is a pretty poor design for cutting much except for the rice stalks that it was originally intended. As a combat weapon it is much more of a thrusting implement than for cutting.

I'd also like to point out that even bladed weapons strictly designed for war are not capable of "cutting through just about anything."

Lamont

Kamas, when used properly, are very effective. Due to the fact the hook design of the blade make it great for trapping arms and the neck. Once the inital contact is made, the kama is then recoiled, cutting and trapping the target. Kamas also have the benefit of striking with an axe-like motion to stick the blade into the opponent (and doing some nice damage on the way out). One would also have the benefit of a reverse grip for powerful upward cuts to the groin/inner thigh area.

Also, when the Kama was used for combat "back in the day" a sash or rope was tied to the kama so it could be swung at the opponent. And kamas can come in many blade designs.

It has also always been my favorite tournament weapon.
 

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There is a small hardware store in Japantown area in San Francisco, where you can get real Kamas. They are sold as a gardening tool, and they have live, sharp steel blades.

Most of the ones you get from the martial arts suppliers are blunted fakes.

Might be interesting to pick one up and try it out. I've never played with them, but I could see how they could be effective if you hook the blade around the neck, or a limb, and then pull and cut. Seems like it would require a pretty specific technique tho, not just slashing it around.

Regarding my own favorites, it's hard to say. I have some material from the traditional Chinese weapons, staff, spear, sword and broadsword. I can't decide which I like better with regards to technique. They all have their flavor, and different characteristics. With regard to the weapon itself, nothing beats the romantic image of a well-made sword.
 

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HKphooey said:
Kamas, when used properly, are very effective. Due to the fact the hook design of the blade make it great for trapping arms and the neck. Once the inital contact is made, the kama is then recoiled, cutting and trapping the target. Kamas also have the benefit of stricking with an axe-like motion to stick the blade into the opponent (and doing some nice damage on the way out). One would also have the benfit of a reverse grip for powerful upward cuts to the groin/inner thigh area.

Also, when the Kama was used for combat "back in the day" a sash or rope was tied to the kama so it could be swung at the opponent. And kamas can come in many blade designs.

It has also always been my favorite tournament weapon.

Dude, ya beat me to the post. You just verified the thoughts I was having.
 

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Oooeeewww, forgot the spear. Another nice one. Staff, blade, throwing blade all in one.
 

Flying Crane

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beau_safken said:
No offense but even swords are made for slashing and breaking bones. Not the way all the movies and such make it out that its all lightsaber like. With all the armor that was worn in the old days, the sword was more of less a way of breaking bones and slashing to cause casualties not actually killing a person. Course, thats a pretty broad idea but i'm sure you all get the idea.

Yeah, I think there is truth in what you say. A battlefield sword was both sharp, but also relied on a cleaving impact to do damage and break bones or at least cause trauma if the armor prevented an actual cut.

Regarding the Chinese sword, there is a distinction between the Gentleman's (scholar's) sword, and the Battle sword.

The Gentleman's sword was lighter, and meant to be carried by a civilian for personal protection. It was not meant to stand up to heavy battlefield use, nor cut thru armor, so it was much lighter, but razor sharp. A Gentleman's sword would be quickly destroyed on a battlefield.

The Battle sword was meant to stand up to heavy, prolonged use and cut thru armor (to the extent possible, anyway), and so had a much heavier and more durable blade. This also made it slower, and required greater strenght to use.

Tho I can't give specific examples, I believe this difference in size, weight, and purpose of the weapon would also mandate a difference in technique. I think technique for a Gentleman's sword would be quicker, and more precise to attack lethal targets that probably were not covered in armor. A Battle sword would be more bold and ferocious, because lethal targets would more likely be protected by some kind of armor, so the weapon just needed to hit hard to cause damage.
 

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HKphooey said:
Kamas, when used properly, are very effective. Due to the fact the hook design of the blade make it great for trapping arms and the neck. Once the inital contact is made, the kama is then recoiled, cutting and trapping the target. Kamas also have the benefit of striking with an axe-like motion to stick the blade into the opponent (and doing some nice damage on the way out). One would also have the benefit of a reverse grip for powerful upward cuts to the groin/inner thigh area.

Also, when the Kama was used for combat "back in the day" a sash or rope was tied to the kama so it could be swung at the opponent. And kamas can come in many blade designs.

It has also always been my favorite tournament weapon.

I agree with the use of it for trapping, its ability to thrust (you refer to it as an axe-like motion), but I posted about strictly its ability as a cutting weapon, where it fairs poorly against other weapons designed for such.

Lamont
 
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