New Year's Resolutions and the people who won't

Bill Mattocks

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Welcome to 2024.

The new year will begin for many martial arts schools and gyms with some fresh new faces, eager to fulfill their desire to learn martial arts, build muscle, get in shape, lose weight, and so on.

We will welcome them. Then they'll quit. By the end of the year, one or two out of hundreds will still be training.

It's not their fault. The dream is very different from the reality. Results often come slowly. It takes time, dedication, and money. Life happens.

For those looking to start, I say I hope you have patience with yourself and your progress. It's a journey that's worthwhile for many. If it turns out not to be your thing, no worries. Thanks for giving it a shot. For those who quit before, we'll still be there if you change your mind. The door's always open. There's no shame, no judgment, no stigma attached. Come on in and start training again.

And welcome to 2024.
 

Bujingodai

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I have a new class starting on the 14th. Just some 5 hr weekend classes. Requested to come out of retirement. Ages 28-35, not at all keen on discussion. They in my opinion will disappear by March completely when they see the commitment required. Like the gym, which is a hell hole this week. Will lighten up by March. For now it is a comedy routine of people trying to outgrunt each other.
 
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Bill Mattocks

Bill Mattocks

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I have a new class starting on the 14th. Just some 5 hr weekend classes. Requested to come out of retirement. Ages 28-35, not at all keen on discussion. They in my opinion will disappear by March completely when they see the commitment required. Like the gym, which is a hell hole this week. Will lighten up by March. For now it is a comedy routine of people trying to outgrunt each other.
I'm always glad to see people are thinking about things like working out and getting fit and learning martial arts, but of course there is the downside that most or all of them will give up. At least they tried, and maybe a few will stick around long enough to learn something. I wish them all luck and perseverance.
 

BaehrTKD

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Welcome to 2024.

The new year will begin for many martial arts schools and gyms with some fresh new faces, eager to fulfill their desire to learn martial arts, build muscle, get in shape, lose weight, and so on.

We will welcome them. Then they'll quit. By the end of the year, one or two out of hundreds will still be training.

It's not their fault. The dream is very different from the reality. Results often come slowly. It takes time, dedication, and money. Life happens.

For those looking to start, I say I hope you have patience with yourself and your progress. It's a journey that's worthwhile for many. If it turns out not to be your thing, no worries. Thanks for giving it a shot. For those who quit before, we'll still be there if you change your mind. The door's always open. There's no shame, no judgment, no stigma attached. Come on in and start training again.

And welcome to 2024.
I lost my Dad in 2023. Hoping for a better year this year.

My New Year's resolution is to trim down a bit. 綽
 
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Bill Mattocks

Bill Mattocks

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I lost my Dad in 2023. Hoping for a better year this year.

My New Year's resolution is to trim down a bit. 綽
Sorry to hear that. It's been 20 years since I lost my dad, I still remember it like it was yesterday. I wish you the best.
 

Gerry Seymour

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Welcome to 2024.

The new year will begin for many martial arts schools and gyms with some fresh new faces, eager to fulfill their desire to learn martial arts, build muscle, get in shape, lose weight, and so on.

We will welcome them. Then they'll quit. By the end of the year, one or two out of hundreds will still be training.

It's not their fault. The dream is very different from the reality. Results often come slowly. It takes time, dedication, and money. Life happens.

For those looking to start, I say I hope you have patience with yourself and your progress. It's a journey that's worthwhile for many. If it turns out not to be your thing, no worries. Thanks for giving it a shot. For those who quit before, we'll still be there if you change your mind. The door's always open. There's no shame, no judgment, no stigma attached. Come on in and start training again.

And welcome to 2024.
I love this kind of post. People quit for a variety of reasons. I think most quit because their priorities interfere. We (instructors and serious students) can develop a knee-jerk reaction that they are "quitters". I don't like that term. It's okay to quit if you're not getting what you want. Just don't quit because you don't think you're "good enough". I certainly wasn't - at many times along my journey in MA and other things. Some of those were important enough to me to stick with it and get "good enough".

I've had a few students - very few - who came back. Every one of them was someone I had missed and was very happy to have back.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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People quit for a variety of reasons.
People quite MA training because they may not know the value of it. My long fist teacher is 98 years old (July 5, 1926 - ...) and still living strong today because his lifetime training.


Today, I walked on the beach. When I did inside/outside crescent kicks over my head, I could feel that I was still in my 20. You just can't find any other way that can give you a long and healthy life besides MA training.
 
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Steve

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You know, everyone is different. I hope everyone has a little fun in FY24, and that when we get to the end of the year, we can all look back on the year with no regrets. If that means starting or returning to a martial art, great. If that means quitting a martial art for any reason (or no reason), that's fine, too.

Whatever gets you out of bed and moving is what I hope you do. Learn to crochet. Or just buy the kit, try it once, and then stuff it in a drawer for 6 months until you give it to your neighbor's kid. Grow some magic mushrooms in your garage (well, maybe that's not a good idea). You get the idea.
 

Gerry Seymour

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People quite MA training because they may not know the value of it.
Not everyone. Some people quit simply because it doesn't provide the value they value. Personal priorities matter.
My long fist teacher is 98 years old (July 5, 1926 - ...) and still living strong today because his lifetime training.
My Judo instructor spoke about this once. It's confirmation bias. Old instructors may be old because of their training. It may also be that they simply are the instructors who managed to be old. There are certainly a lot of instructors who, in spite of or even because of their training, are no longer teaching later in life and have infirmities - and don't live to be 98.

I've also seen interviews with centenarians who claimed their longevity was because they did something like drink a whiskey every day.

Today, I walked on the beach. When I did inside/outside crescent kicks over my head, I could feel that I was still in my 20. You just can't find any other way that can give you a long and healthy life besides MA training.
Sure you can. There are many other forms of exercise that can provide that health value. There are other practices that provide similar (or better) flexibility benefits. There are many pursuits that provide the satisfaction we get from MA.
 

Steve

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Mushy peas
I stand... urp... 丐 corrected. 亢 :D

Not everyone. Some people quit simply because it doesn't provide the value they value. Personal priorities matter.

My Judo instructor spoke about this once. It's confirmation bias. Old instructors may be old because of their training. It may also be that they simply are the instructors who managed to be old. There are certainly a lot of instructors who, in spite of or even because of their training, are no longer teaching later in life and have infirmities - and don't live to be 98.

I always get a kick out of the boomers saying, "Back in my day, no one wore seat belts, and we survived just fine," without a trace of irony or self-awareness.

I've also seen interviews with centenarians who claimed their longevity was because they did something like drink a whiskey every day.
Those are the only centenarians I listen to. The rest are senile. ;)
 
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