Need more advice in cane fight practice

lklawson

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I assume this is illegal too. :)

View attachment 28004
Not in Ohio.

In Ohio it's legal to "open carry" large knives and even swords. You'll, um... "draw attention," probably unwanted attention, and maybe a "friendly visit" from the local constabulary, but it's not illegal.

We just had a change in our knife laws last year. It was focused around "automatic knives" and "going forth armed" details related to knives but it might have affected sword-sticks/sword-canes. So I can now carry an automatic knife now but I don't know if it impacted a sword-stick. I'll have to go do some more research.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

lklawson

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Not in Ohio.

In Ohio it's legal to "open carry" large knives and even swords. You'll, um... "draw attention," probably unwanted attention, and maybe a "friendly visit" from the local constabulary, but it's not illegal.

We just had a change in our knife laws last year. It was focused around "automatic knives" and "going forth armed" details related to knives but it might have affected sword-sticks/sword-canes. So I can now carry an automatic knife now but I don't know if it impacted a sword-stick. I'll have to go do some more research.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
According to Ohio Revised Code 2923.12 (H)
"For purposes of this section, "deadly weapon" or "weapon" does not include any knife, razor, or cutting instrument if the instrument was not used as a weapon."

So, in "black letter law" a sword-stick (or gravity knife, automatic knife, switch-blade, or, well, any blade or knife) is only illegal to carry if it's USED as a "deadly weapon" (elsewhere defined, but it's essentially the self-evident definition). And, typically, if you use a knife as a deadly weapon in Ohio you can use an Affirmative Defense, where you "admit" that you broke the law but there were extenuating circumstances, typically "self defense."

That said, I don't think I'd like to be the first trial case on how a sword-stick applies to the new Ohio law. A prosecutor looking to make a name or just "send a message" could easily argue that there's no utility purpose to a sword-stick and therefore it must have been carried as a weapon (despite the new terminology specifying "used" as a weapon).

I mean, I own a sword-cane, 'cuz, you know... they're neat. I'm just not confident about legally carrying it in Ohio right now.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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