My First Commercial

ATC

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My school started using a new school management software and the company chose our school to shoot a vid promo. I am last person speaking in the clip. Was pretty cool to see how they shoot this stuff. They shot 4 hours of footage and the clip is only 5 minutes. I can only imagine how much footage they use for a movie. Again, I am the last person interviewed in the clip.
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Steve

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My school started using a new school management software and the company chose our school to shoot a vid promo. I am last person speaking in the clip. Was pretty cool to see how they shoot this stuff. They shot 4 hours of footage and the clip is only 5 minutes. I can only imagine how much footage they use for a movie. Again, I am the last person interviewed in the clip.
icon6.png


[yt]X11sz0gSii4[/yt]
Looks good. You're the guy in the turtle neck? Cool.

As for the amount of footage for a movie, it's not exactly the same. Most movies have a script. There may be multiple takes, on set re-writes and then revisions done in post production that require a call-back, but for the most part, it's pretty clean. The director and editor have a good idea of what they're looking for when the record it.

Documentary films can have 100 or more hours of footage pared down to 120 minutes, not including the b-roll. I think that's more along the lines of how this was shot.
 

SahBumNimRush

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Sounds like an interesting set up. Keep us posted on how the instructor/school owner likes it down the road?
 
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ATC

ATC

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Looks good. You're the guy in the turtle neck? Cool.

As for the amount of footage for a movie, it's not exactly the same. Most movies have a script. There may be multiple takes, on set re-writes and then revisions done in post production that require a call-back, but for the most part, it's pretty clean. The director and editor have a good idea of what they're looking for when the record it.

Documentary films can have 100 or more hours of footage pared down to 120 minutes, not including the b-roll. I think that's more along the lines of how this was shot.
No not the sweater guy, I am the last instructor to talk. I am actually on the splash or still image. The guy in the sweater is a parent/student. Thanks for the info.
 

Zero

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So you are "Art"? Or do you mean the Philipino lady?
Congrats on your first "fifteen minutes" of fame - I say that in a good way, not disparagingly!! I was lucky enough to work as an extra in TV and movie work for a couple of years alongside my studies and then full time job. It is mind blowing how much time is put into a single shot or scene at times. For a TV series, a scene can be done in a few takes or sometimes one clean take. For a movie we often spent a whole day just on a couple/few scenes, very long, tiring, hot (but fun!) days - it was a great job for a student, good money and meals/food part of the package and plenty of it laid out (key!). Going around in make-up took a bit of getting used to.
 
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