Martial Arts and Cross training!

BigBoss42695

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First off, I would like to say hello to all of you and thank you for reading my question. I would like to ask a few questions....What do you beleive are the best styles to cross train in? What martial art styles do you practice?
I believe the best style(s) to train is would be...
Muay Thai,Boxing,Judo and Brazilian Jujitsu, I think these are the best styles to train in because...

Muay Thai is the science of 8 limbs teaches you to use your Feet,Hands,Elbows and Knees is a fight is also teaches you to use the clinch to your advantage. Some people call it the most powerful and lethal martial art.

Boxing is a pure striking art that only uses you hands, and Boxing is being underrated as a fighting style that can truly help you in a danger's situation, Its punches are the best in the world. Not to mention its great foot work.

Combine Muay Thai and Boxing, you will be an amazing striker.

Judo, a down sized version of jujitsu, but concentrates on throws more that jujitsu, it teaches you how to dominate your opponent and teaches you submission moves and locks, it is said to be a very fast and energetic martial art.

Brazilian Jujitsu is a martial art that mostly ground work, it teaches you how to throw down you opponent and use submission moves and locks to weaken and hurt your opponent but be warned this is purely a ground fighting martial art, that means you will have to put your opponent on the ground.

Combine Judo and Brazilian Jujitsu and you will be an amazing grappler and ground fighter

and.....if you combine all four arts you will be, overall an Amazing Fighter.

What do you think?
 

clfsean

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Focus on one, become amazingly proficient. Then determine what you think you're lacking & go study that to become amazingly proficient in that aspect. That should about do it for you.

The problem IMHO with cross training is everybody wants to become good at everything so they study a little bit of everything since they have no time (in their minds) to study & gain true proficiency at one thing, they become mediocre at everything with nothing exceptional about their skill at anything.

Pick one... learn it inside & out, up & down, waking & breathing. See if you really think something's missing. Go find the absolute best version of what it is, do the same thing while maintaining your practice of the first.

BTW... welcome to MT. Why not slide over to the intro section & tell us about you.
 

terryl965

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Well firstof Bigboss welcome to the board and as you may know we have a meet and greet section for introduction and all.

On to your question I believe people need more than a special art to be effective for Self Defense since it is more about a person than an art. All of the arts you mention are great together or by themself, I myselfhave trained in Okinawa Karate, TKD, Hapkido, combat Hapkido and Judo. I feel that I have enough to be able to survive an attack notice I said survive because if you can walk away you won. Lets look at everything from theperspective that not everyone can defens themself but be tought to learn how to be in the right surroundings and the right attitude if something did occur. I know plenty of people that have trained for years and cannot even get out of a jam or anything for that matter. remember not alll men and women are created equal. I hope you enjoy your stay and look forward to some of your post.
 

Xue Sheng

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Focus on one, become amazingly proficient. Then determine what you think you're lacking & go study that to become amazingly proficient in that aspect. That should about do it for you.

The problem IMHO with cross training is everybody wants to become good at everything so they study a little bit of everything since they have no time (in their minds) to study & gain true proficiency at one thing, they become mediocre at everything with nothing exceptional about their skill at anything.

Pick one... learn it inside & out, up & down, waking & breathing. See if you really think something's missing. Go find the absolute best version of what it is, do the same thing while maintaining your practice of the first.

BTW... welcome to MT. Why not slide over to the intro section & tell us about you.


What clfsean said.

Well firstof Bigboss welcome to the board and as you may know we have a meet and greet section for introduction and all.

On to your question I believe people need more than a special art to be effective for Self Defense since it is more about a person than an art. All of the arts you mention are great together or by themself, I myselfhave trained in Okinawa Karate, TKD, Hapkido, combat Hapkido and Judo. I feel that I have enough to be able to survive an attack notice I said survive because if you can walk away you won. Lets look at everything from theperspective that not everyone can defens themself but be tought to learn how to be in the right surroundings and the right attitude if something did occur. I know plenty of people that have trained for years and cannot even get out of a jam or anything for that matter. remember not alll men and women are created equal. I hope you enjoy your stay and look forward to some of your post.

OK...what terry said too
 

Rich Parsons

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First off, I would like to say hello to all of you and thank you for reading my question. I would like to ask a few questions....

As Terry stated, jump over the the meet and greet and give a post there as well for an introduction.

It is always good to ask questions.

And welcome to Martial Talk.


What do you beleive are the best styles to cross train in?

It depends upon your skills already and your goals. It also depends upon your availability to qualified instruction.

Personally, I train in two FMA's. One is a traditional system and the other is has portions of traditional FMA Systems and Karate and Judo and Small Circle JuJistu.


What martial art styles do you practice?

Modern Arnis and Balintawak.


I believe the best style(s) to train is would be...
Muay Thai,Boxing,Judo and Brazilian Jujitsu, I think these are the best styles to train in because...

It is good to have a starting point for your discussions. Also a place to start you training as well. As Sean stated start with one and get proficeint with that art and then from there choose another that address spcifics you are looking for.

It is not always the art, but the heart of the person in the fight.


Muay Thai is the science of 8 limbs teaches you to use your Feet,Hands,Elbows and Knees is a fight is also teaches you to use the clinch to your advantage. Some people call it the most powerful and lethal martial art.

I think the art of pushing buttons which could launch Global Thermal Nuclear Devices as the most powerful and lethal martial art there is. But if we scale back the scope, I would have to say the FMA's are very deadly with their blade and impact weapons and empty hands. But, if you have a skilled thug who knows two moves, of block and punch really well and the guy with a stick knows barely how to hang on to it, it may not matter.

I reserve absolutes, when speaking of training and systems.



Boxing is a pure striking art that only uses you hands, and Boxing is being underrated as a fighting style that can truly help you in a danger's situation, Its punches are the best in the world. Not to mention its great foot work.

Not just good striking and good foot work but also good body work. I still have a problem with saying best in the world. See above comments on this as well. For it all depends.

Combine Muay Thai and Boxing, you will be an amazing striker.

One can be an amazing stiker with these two arts. Yes.


Judo, a down sized version of jujitsu, but concentrates on throws more that jujitsu, it teaches you how to dominate your opponent and teaches you submission moves and locks, it is said to be a very fast and energetic martial art.

All arts try to teach you to dominate your opponent. Judo teachs great balance and reading of your body versus your opponents body. Plus much more.

Brazilian Jujitsu is a martial art that mostly ground work, it teaches you how to throw down you opponent and use submission moves and locks to weaken and hurt your opponent but be warned this is purely a ground fighting martial art, that means you will have to put your opponent on the ground.

I am not sure that it is a purely ground system. But my exposure is limited. I would also say that any grappling can be effective be it stand up or on the ground. But I also have to say this works in competition, but for self defense against multiple opponents being tied up gives the bad guys friends the chance to come at you from other angles.

Are you looking for a Sport for or self defense? I do not put down the sport form, the UFC and other leagues have fanominal atheltes.

Combine Judo and Brazilian Jujitsu and you will be an amazing grappler and ground fighter

I still think amazing would depend upon the person. Is it possible? Yes. Is it gaurenteed just because I went to class and paid some money? No.



and.....if you combine all four arts you will be, overall an Amazing Fighter.

I think you would be amazing if you were an expert in any of the four. If you combined all four at a really functional level then it could be amazing as well. But for the time involved you may find that most people will be weaker in one or two areas.

What do you think?

I think it all depends.

Personally I would add in some weapons training as well.

Blade and Stick and Knife and improvised, and even firearms. But that may not be your goal, so it all depends upon the person and their goal.

It is ok for someone to go to a school/Dojo and train and learn that system and do it just for the exercise. If that is all they want. If they want to defend themselves then they should get with people who do that.

It all depends.
 

LuckyKBoxer

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First off, I would like to say hello to all of you and thank you for reading my question. I would like to ask a few questions....What do you beleive are the best styles to cross train in? What martial art styles do you practice?
I believe the best style(s) to train is would be...
Muay Thai,Boxing,Judo and Brazilian Jujitsu, I think these are the best styles to train in because...

Muay Thai is the science of 8 limbs teaches you to use your Feet,Hands,Elbows and Knees is a fight is also teaches you to use the clinch to your advantage. Some people call it the most powerful and lethal martial art.

Boxing is a pure striking art that only uses you hands, and Boxing is being underrated as a fighting style that can truly help you in a danger's situation, Its punches are the best in the world. Not to mention its great foot work.

Combine Muay Thai and Boxing, you will be an amazing striker.

Judo, a down sized version of jujitsu, but concentrates on throws more that jujitsu, it teaches you how to dominate your opponent and teaches you submission moves and locks, it is said to be a very fast and energetic martial art.

Brazilian Jujitsu is a martial art that mostly ground work, it teaches you how to throw down you opponent and use submission moves and locks to weaken and hurt your opponent but be warned this is purely a ground fighting martial art, that means you will have to put your opponent on the ground.

Combine Judo and Brazilian Jujitsu and you will be an amazing grappler and ground fighter

and.....if you combine all four arts you will be, overall an Amazing Fighter.

What do you think?

I think you have the basic recipe that most MMA fighters have put together for the last 15+ years.

I think the reasons they work well is they fit in the sports fighting model well under the rules of engagement.

I think another reason they work well, that you have not listed is because they focus on all the unarmed ranges.

Now the big thing you left out, if weapon work. In a real world situation I will take the guy with no legs in a wheel chair with an Uzi 100 times out of 100 against the best unarmed fighter on the planet.

So one component you should have been more clear on is what purpose you are crosstraining for? If its to kill someone then I suggest firearms and knive training crosstrained with aggresive driving tactics, and possibly explosives training.

If its for self help/self defense then I suggest healthy eating, cardiovascular and muscle training, along with martial arts to cover all ranges.

If its for sports fighting then I suggest a person become masterful starting in the 1st range you will face which is out of range... this includes footwork, closing the gap, moving offline etc. It is more important in my opinion to master this first and then in order striking range, clinch range, throwing/takedown range, grappling range.

Obviously you can work on all ranges at one time, and develop in all at once, and I suggest if you are going to compete professionally that you do that while focusing primarily on the out of range movement.

Machida is a perfect example of someone who has spent years and years working on that range, it has made him dominant in his division when combined with his other skills.

Another X factor so to speak is something that has already been mentioned above, and that is heart or spirit or whatever you chose to name it.. there is no one art that makes the toughest, most incredible fighters, it is their heart that gives them the ability to excell, and they take whatever skills they learned to propel them to the top. I have known some great fighters that take some styles that are considered mostly a joke when it comes to fighting, these men would be excellent regardless whether they trained or what art they trained in. I have also known some well decorate veterans of many styles and ranges that have all the technical ability but can not put it together to work for them in a real encounter.
 

sempai little1

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I agree also with clfsean "Become amazingly proficient in one". A jack of all trades a master of none. If you master one, then, and I am taking this from my own experiences in different workshops, you find that the other arts come easier because you already know how to make your body do what it doesn't want to do. You have learnt to adapt to situations. Foot note here, I am NO MASTER at anything, just proficient.

I am a Nidan (2nd degree Black Belt) in Karate (Shorin Ryu) I go next year to test for my Sondan. Then I am thinking of trying a new art. Still training my first love, but challenging myself with something very new.
I was thinking Kung Fu. In Karate we do hard movements and with Kung Fu having the soft flowing movements, I find this challenging and so a great next step in my training.

Besides cross training should be done in the gym with weights, jump ropes, Plyometrics, and other such workout regiment.
This is the best way to compliment your Art.

Your friend,
Sempai Little1 :wavey:
 

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