Lower back and hip pain

sfs982000

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Just out of curiousity, who out there has problems with lower back & hip pain that affects their training. If so any suggestions or tips to help out? With me some days are better than others, just curious as to any particular stretching routines that might help me out.
 

ATC

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Yep that is me. Went to a specialist, had an MRI and everything. More exercise. stronger core and legs helped a lot. So I started doing deep horse stances and squates. Also did more core work as well. This all helped greatly.

But I would see a doctor first to make sure there is nothing else wrong also.
 

zDom

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Follow the above advice re: see a physician,

given that


a lot of lower back pain can be directly linked to weak abs (i.e., core, as also mentioned above).

Situps (to reduce stress on neck, keep hands at your bellybutton, knees slightly bent, keep your heels on the floor) not only strengthen your abs/core, but also gently stretch lower back muscles.

Good posture (which, again, goes back to using those abs to keep yourself erect instead of letting the lower back do the work ...) also goes a long way.
 

Kembudo-Kai Kempoka

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Squats. Deadlifts. Step-back lunges. Back Hyper-extensions.

I have been a back-pain patient since I was 12, because of the martial arts. I am a chiropractor -- back pain doctor. I have known for years that these 4 exercises are the answer. Every once in awhile, I do them with enough disciplined regularity to make a difference, and my back problem magically goes from constant and severe, to mild and "once in awhile".

I am, however, too lazy to make a twice-weekly routine out of them, and so I suffer. I have offered this same advice to thousands of patients over the years. To date, only one has done it, and he remains back-pain free.
 

xJOHNx

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Follow the above advice re: see a physician,

given that


a lot of lower back pain can be directly linked to weak abs (i.e., core, as also mentioned above).

Situps (to reduce stress on neck, keep hands at your bellybutton, knees slightly bent, keep your heels on the floor) not only strengthen your abs/core, but also gently stretch lower back muscles.

Good posture (which, again, goes back to using those abs to keep yourself erect instead of letting the lower back do the work ...) also goes a long way.
Small sidenote. MBE showed that sit ups, only strengthen the Rectus Abdominis (the famous 8 pack) and actually can make backpain worse. A good core workout on the other had trains your deeper muscles (which are type I, so slow contracting muscle tissue) for endurance and trains your full core.

Sit ups triple the pressure put on the Disci Intervertebrali in normal circumstances and can lead to a hernia.
Als sit ups train the muscle to have lots of Type II muscle tissue. Which doesn't stabilize your core as the muscle gets tired very quickly due to depleting Creatine and ATP supplies in your muscle.

Type I on the other hand uses Krebscycli (aerobic energy) to work. So they can work alot longer.

and Kembudo, as a physician, you should know that a good core is required to do the exercices you mention. Yes they build muscle of the top layer (Musculus Lathisimus Dorsi and to some extent the musc. Spina Erector). Again, these are type II muscles and cannot perform the role of stabilizer.
The small deep muscles on the other hand CAN do that. As they are type I.

These are the muscles that need to be trained for a solid core: http://catalog.nucleusinc.com/generateexhibit.php?ID=9299

If someone wants more information. I'll be happy to reply
(p.s.: I don't want to be a smart***, but there are alot of misconceptions about the lowerback/hip/sacroiliacal area out there. Most of the advice given, has been proven to actualy worsen it. Prevention is the key. And since I'm so close to the source, I would like to share this info with people who can benefit from it. I'm a fysio therapist student by the way.)

It comes down to core training. Again and again. Also running helps to develop these muscles.
 

ATC

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Small sidenote. MBE showed that sit ups, only strengthen the Rectus Abdominis (the famous 8 pack) and actually can make backpain worse. A good core workout on the other had trains your deeper muscles (which are type I, so slow contracting muscle tissue) for endurance and trains your full core.

Sit ups triple the pressure put on the Disci Intervertebrali in normal circumstances and can lead to a hernia.
Als sit ups train the muscle to have lots of Type II muscle tissue. Which doesn't stabilize your core as the muscle gets tired very quickly due to depleting Creatine and ATP supplies in your muscle.

Type I on the other hand uses Krebscycli (aerobic energy) to work. So they can work alot longer.

and Kembudo, as a physician, you should know that a good core is required to do the exercices you mention. Yes they build muscle of the top layer (Musculus Lathisimus Dorsi and to some extent the musc. Spina Erector). Again, these are type II muscles and cannot perform the role of stabilizer.
The small deep muscles on the other hand CAN do that. As they are type I.

These are the muscles that need to be trained for a solid core: http://catalog.nucleusinc.com/generateexhibit.php?ID=9299

If someone wants more information. I'll be happy to reply
(p.s.: I don't want to be a smart***, but there are alot of misconceptions about the lowerback/hip/sacroiliacal area out there. Most of the advice given, has been proven to actualy worsen it. Prevention is the key. And since I'm so close to the source, I would like to share this info with people who can benefit from it. I'm a fysio therapist student by the way.)

It comes down to core training. Again and again. Also running helps to develop these muscles.
That is why I said core work and not any specific exercise. I went to a therapist and they had me do a bunch of stuff that I thought was silly but it seemed to work.
 

xJOHNx

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If I have time this weekend, I'll make a post about it in the health section. Discussing all of the muscles in the back.

Luckily for me I have classes from one of the leading experts on (lower)back research. The guy's insights are genial.
 

zDom

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My apologies for perpetuating what appears to be a fitness myth.


We do a wide variety of core and back strengthening and stretching (and body weight squats!) in hapkido, the combination of which has provided outstanding results as far as lower back strength and not having lower back pain.

Apparently I was mistaken on which specific exercises are contributing to my well being and was merely parroting a common myth.

Thanks for setting the record straight!

I'll be looking up the latest research on this subject so I can better advise new students who struggle with lower back pain.
 

xJOHNx

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Oof, glad you have an open mind. :)

It is a bit of a fitness myth, but than again, the research I was talking about dates back to 1997 or something. So it's quite new.

You are absolutely right, squats and core training greatly enhances the lowerback musculature. So you have been doing a great job!

I'll write a more detailed post on Sunday about the lower back, I still need to read up on one course (yes, lower back pain has become a separate course because of the epedemic proportions it is taking in the Wstern World). So that I don't spread half-truths.

'till then
 
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