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muayThaiPerson

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does anyone know or practice kickboxing? not muay thai. how is the kick performed? is it like muay thais, where the hip is twisted? how is it
 

Zepp

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From what I've seen of kickboxing classes, they're usually just geared around an aerobic workout. If a workout is all that you want that's great. But if you're interested in self-defense or competition, a TMA or MMA instructor probably has a lot more to teach you.

As for the kicking, it depends on the instructor's backround. The name "kickboxing" by itself only really tells you that they don't do grappling.
 
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Angus

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There are many different arts that blend into competitive non-Muay Thai kickboxing matches; anything from shotokan to taekwondo to san shou, etc. Basically every art but Muay Thai will have many more than 1 kick. The one you're referring to, the roundhouse, is usually done all ways including Muay Thai's way and changed up depending the circumstances of openings during the match. That's just what I've seen in the kickboxing I've witnessed.

There are so many different arts that are "kickboxing" that it solely depends on the fighter and his trainers.
 
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MartialArtist

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Originally posted by muayThaiPerson
does anyone know or practice kickboxing? not muay thai. how is the kick performed? is it like muay thais, where the hip is twisted? how is it
Do you mean American kickboxing? Cause thai boxing is kick boxing. The American kickboxing you see is more sport oriented than muay thai.

From what I've personally seen in my limited experience in American kickboxing, I think it's more of the Shotokan kick : http://www.kyokushinmail.com/koya/KickInstruction.htm
 
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J-kid

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American Kickboxing has rules like there are spots you cant kick like the knee for instence.
 
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Angus

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You can't kick to the front of the knee in any professional rules...it would put the other fighter out of a career.
 
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Angus

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Yeah, broken knees aren't easily repairable.
 
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muayThaiPerson

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Oh I see, kickboxing is just a term to refer to arts that incorporate kicks and are striking. Thanks
 
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sweeper

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from what I understand kicking to the front of the knee is legal in san shou.

Kickboxing could describe just about anthing, but usualy in the US when someone says that they "kickbox" they are refering to american kickboxing. If I recal american kicboxing basicly evolved out of full contact karate matches in the 70s but it's gone it's own way...
 

Johnathan Napalm

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Originally posted by Angus
..... Basically every art but Muay Thai will have many more than 1 kick. ....

Who says Muay Thai has only 1 kick? Ever seen a Muay Thai match before?
 
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fringe_dweller

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Originally posted by Johnathan Napalm
Who says Muay Thai has only 1 kick? Ever seen a Muay Thai match before?

Hi Jonathon,

Try to understand that on a forum it's very hard to "read" the tone of a persons post. Maybe consider enlightening us as to the various kicks rather than throwing out what seems to be a baited comment?

Respectfully,
 
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Deathtrap101

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Who says Muay Thai has only 1 kick? Ever seen a Muay Thai match before?

I have seen several matches, and i can only recall a roundhouse and a pushkick ever being used.
 

Johnathan Napalm

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Just a short synapsis.

1. Roundhouse to thigh, rib and neck.
2. Push kick.
3. Front kick.
4. Reverse Roundhouse
5. Back kick.
6. Cut kick.

With these, the variations can increase at least to 36 different foot techniques, depending on your school/camp.
 
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Deathtrap101

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What is a cut kick and a reverse roundhouse(hook kick?)??
 

Johnathan Napalm

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Cut kick is like a push kick, except that it is directed at the attacking leg (the thigh, actually), to cut off the kick.

Reverse roundhouse is what you called the hook kick (unless you are in Jeet Kune Do, which calls its roundhouse hook kicks, and its hook kicks, sweep kicks :rolleyes: )
 
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Angus

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It was sarcasm, but fairly truthful. The only real offensive kick done in Muay Thai is a roundhouse, being that a push kick isn't meant to really do damage. There are plenty of other kicks in Muay Thai, but rarely are they trained because they aren't as commonly used. Some are roundhouse derivatives, like a cut kick. Not a bad thing, just how it's trained. Some do hook kicks and spinning hooks and things (I do and I train in Muay Thai), but competatively, it's hardly ever seen. It wasn't a baited comment (I hate the internet because of the lack of voice tonality; I apologize if it sounded inflammatory), it was simply stating that Muay Thai as trained in competative gyms is (beautifully) simple.

A cut kick as I've always seen it is basically a mid-level roundhouse that's swept down to knee (or so) level, attacking the thigh or behind the knee, or knock the person over by taking out the front leg. Sometimes done head level and swept down do mid level to sneak a kick in, but then only does damage rather than knocking the person down or picking away at a limb. I think it can also be done going low to high, but I've never seen it actually done (not really cutting at that point, it would seem!). Pretty tricky and usually done when the person is in front stance (weight on front leg) rather than stocking stance.

The kick Jonathan described above is a stop kick. I've never seen that described as a cut kick. Just IME.
 
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sweeper

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I think you also see some side kicks from fighters comming out of the americas. I don't know what is required to make aa kick a "thai" boxing technique, I think you could probably find a mauy thai gym teaching almost any kick (though maybe only one gym).
 
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bob919

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it's true that muay thai fighters rarely use any kick except from the roundhouse and occasionally the front kick, but who says this is a bad thing they cause lots of damage and you can react faster when you only are used to using a couple of moves
 
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Angus

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It's not a bad thing. If you know a few techniques and know them REALLY well, it's much better than knowing a million but not being able to apply them as well.
 

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