Karate in Boxing

lklawson

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Edwin Haislet, a well respected Boxing coach, Professor of Physical Education, Director of the Northwest Golden Gloves, and author of one of the most authoritative and respected boxing manuals from the '40s.

In his (still) highly regarded manual on boxing he details many techniques and strategies. Among them he teaches what he calls Straight Blows to the Body:

Edwin Haislet's Boxing - pp23 Fig 27 Left Jab to Body
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Edwin Haislet's Boxing - pp23 Fig 28 Straight Right to Body
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By way of instruction he writes:
Haislet said:
THE LEFT JAB TO THE BODY
If the principle is followed that the body must follow the arm at all
times, no difficulty will be encountered in executing the straight blows

to the body.
Assume the fundamental position. Before a jab to the body can he
executed, the body must he on the same level as the mark1 in order
that the blow will he straight. Therefore, drop the body forward from
the waist to a position at right angles to the legs. Keep the left leg
only slightly bent but the right leg more completely flexed. As the body
drops, drive the left arm into forceful extension toward the opponent's
solar plexus. The blow is slightly upward, never downward. The right
hand is carried high in front of the body ready for the opponent’s left
hook. Hold the head down so that only the top of the head is visible,
which will be protected by the extended left arm (Figure 17, page 23).
The head should be held tight to the left arm.

THE STRAIGHT RIGHT TO THE BODY
Assume the fundamental position. Drop the body forward from the

waist to a position almost at right angles to the legs and while so
doing, turn to the left so that the right hip is carried forward to the
center line of the body, and the right shoulder is on a line directly
above the left foot. When this position is reached, drive the right arm

into forceful extension. The left hand is up and open, elbow down
guarding against the opponent’s right hand. The head is down along
the right arm and thus well protected (Figure 28, page 23).


Now, Haislet never details an attack without detailing defenses (at least one, usually multiple) against it. In this case, he details 4, but, for this thread, the most intriguing is what he calls the Brush-away.​


Edwin Haislet's Boxing - pp24 Fig 32 The Brush away

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Of this particular defense he writes:​

Haislet said:
The brush-away—is the safest and easiest defense against straight
blows to the body.

Assume the fundamental position. As the opponent leads a straight

left to the body drop the open right glove in down and across the
opponents wrist, thus brushing the blow to the outside. The elbow
hardly moves. The whole movement is a circular motion inward with
the right hand and forearm (Figure 32, page 24).
It is best to use a right-hand brush for a left lead and vice versa.
However, a cross brush can be used to good advantage when a counter

blow is planned.




It doesn't take a genius to notice that this looks nearly exactly like the traditional karate "low block" (gedan barai).


Interesting.​
 
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jarrod

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very interesting!

also a good way to get popped in the face if your opponent figures out what you're doing.

just my opinion,

jf
 
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lklawson

lklawson

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very interesting!

also a good way to get popped in the face if your opponent figures out what you're doing.

just my opinion,
Sure thing! If you know what your opponent is going to do before he does it, you surely can exploit that, particularly if you can "force" him to take that action through a feint and then attack with the "second intention."


Fortunately, Haislet details 3 other methods:
  • The Step -away
  • The Elbow Block
  • The Fore-arm Block
Personally, I like the Step away and the Elbow Block better than the Brush-away and Haislet himself says that the Fore-arm Block is particularly dangerous to try but he includes it, apparently, for completeness. :)

For the "Brush Away," I prefer a slightly different verstion. Same basic movement but you turn your body a bit away from the blow and move you up hand to guard the other side of the face. I use it when parying a cut #4 in Bowie sparring more so than in pugilism. (In Haislet's pic above, picture the left hand being on the right side of the chin, the back of the wrist turned out, protecting the neck, and the right hip "pointed" more at the opponent).

Not that any of them get much workout because, first, the sort of low-line body blow that Haislet shows doesn't get used much anymore (if it ever did) and second, it seems like good strategy to just tense your abs, eat the punch, and follow it up with an upper-cut to his chin. WHEE!

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

jks9199

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Edwin Haislet, a well respected Boxing coach, Professor of Physical Education, Director of the Northwest Golden Gloves, and author of one of the most authoritative and respected boxing manuals from the '40s.

In his (still) highly regarded manual on boxing he details many techniques and strategies. Among them he teaches what he calls Straight Blows to the Body:

Edwin Haislet's Boxing - pp23 Fig 27 Left Jab to Body
picture.php


Edwin Haislet's Boxing - pp23 Fig 28 Straight Right to Body
picture.php


By way of instruction he writes:



Now, Haislet never details an attack without detailing defenses (at least one, usually multiple) against it. In this case, he details 4, but, for this thread, the most intriguing is what he calls the Brush-away.​


Edwin Haislet's Boxing - pp24 Fig 32 The Brush away

picture.php





Of this particular defense he writes:​






It doesn't take a genius to notice that this looks nearly exactly like the traditional karate "low block" (gedan barai).


Interesting.​
Not really surprising...

The human body is built pretty much the same, so there simply aren't but so many ways to use it offensively and defensively.
 

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