What is "The Mark" in historic boxing

lklawson

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In an effort to add some original content (as opposed to restricting myself to commenting on other people's posts), I am replicating here a series of notes I made.

The Mark

Different period authors have different descriptions. For some, it is the Solar Plexus. For others, it is the pit of the stomach.

"The Art of In-Fighting," Frank Kaus, 1913
Fig. 7 - "The In-Fighter's most Deadly Punch: the Right Drive to the pit of the Stomach"
pp34
"The In-Fighter's most Deadly Punch.
This is undoubtedly the most deadly in-fighting punch possible, and means decisive victory if properly administered. In trying for this, however, it must be remembered that a right may come along and upset our plan. Therefore the left is brought up to the opponent's chin almost simultaneously with the right drive to the mark. If successful the left jolt should send your man's head back, a movement which causes the muscles of his stomach to relax."


"Boxing," R.G. Allanson-Winn, 1915
pp10
"...the mark, i.e. over the pit of the stomach, just above the belt, where a severe blow may do so much damage."
Illustration: "GUARD FOR LEFT-HAND HIT AT MARK" shows the forearm barring the pit of the stomach (not the solar plex.).


"The Art and Practice of Boxing," A Celebrated Pugilist, 1825
pp7
"the pit of your stomach, which is called the MARK
Illustration: "Defense of the Face and Pit of the Stomach." shows the forearm barring high, roughly at Solar Plex. level.


"The Art of Boxing," Richard K. Fox Publishing Company, 1913
pp11
"Easily balanced on your feet, the right arm should be across the "mark" (that point where the ribs begin to arch)"



"Boxing," 'Philadelphia' Jack O'Brien, 1928
pp38
"at the same time
driving the left fist to the "mark," which is the depression just beneath the breast-bone."
Plate 10 - "Charlie Wolpert parries my left and shoots his left to the mark." shows a verticle punch to the Solar Plex.


"Boxing," Edwin Haislet, 1940
pp22
"The "mark" is the boxing term used to designate the solar plexus."


"Doran's Science of Self Defense," Bart J. Doran, 1889
pp56
"LEFT-HAND LEAD FOR THE "MARK."
Spring in, bend forward at the hips, case your head well to the right and cast your right shoulder well back and land your left upon his diaphragm."


"The Art of Boxing and Manual of Training," Billy Edwards, 1888
pp47
"Raise your right forearm from the elbow and throw it across the chest so that the middle joint of the thumb, when shut on the fingers, is about the region of the nipple of the left breast, and its direction runs along the right "divide" of the ribs. The spot from whence the ribs branch off the breast-bone to either side is generally known as "the mark," and is the most vulnerable of all the region below the neck."


"Treatise Upon The Useful Science Of Defense," Captain John Godfrey, 1747
"GRETTING had the nearest [sic. neatest?] Way of going to the Stomach (which is what they call the Mark) of any Man I knew."


"How to Box," 'A Professional Boxer', 1882 (plagairism from Ned Donnelly)
pp15
"The right arm should be across the "mark" (that point where the ribs begin to arch)"


"The Modern Art of Boxing," Daniel Mendoza (assumed), 1789 (estimated)
pp30
"The MARK. The pit of the stomach. So called, from its being the object at which a stroke most likely will put an end to a battle can be aimed."
 

David43515

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I was suprised to see so many books from the period that said pit of the stomache. I`ve never seen nearly as much period boxing literature as you quoted, but I`d always heard the mark meant the solar plexus. Who knows?
 

Buka

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Go to the liver.
Go to the sternum.
Go to the ribs.
Notify next of kin.
 
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lklawson

lklawson

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I`ve never seen nearly as much period boxing literature as you quoted
I have access to a lot of period texts and have republished most of what I can.

http://stores.lulu.com/lawson

PDF downloads are free for all the antique repubs.

I still have a few texts on my shelf that I can repub but I've gotten most of them up. :)

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
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