How easy is it to transition to real blades after gaining proficiency in kendo?

pgsmith

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I do agree it SHOULD be a fundamental in sword fighting, because it is

Sorry, forgot to address this one while I was ranting ...
Good edge alignment is not vital for sword fighting. It is vital for target cutting. Swords were created specifically to cut human beings, and they are terribly efficient at it. If I were to cut any part of your body with a poorly aligned sword cut, it would still be devastating and debilitating, and you'd most likely bleed to death from it without immediate medical intervention.

Getting close enough to cut your opponent without being cut yourself. THAT is what's fundamental in sword fighting.

P.S. That video showed horrible form. He needs proper instruction in cutting.
 

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I can't stand it! Tried to ignore it all but I just can't help myself ... Kendo has always had a sporting nature. It was developed specifically to allow practitioners of different sword arts to be able to fight each other without someone dying. They use swords made of split bamboo called shinai, and there are very specific rules regarding how a match is played. It was never intended to teach the actual use of the sword,


No! This is an incorrect statement that, unfortunately, a great many backyard pop-bottle murderers firmly adhere to. Edge alignment (the Japanese term is hasuji) is vital to properly cutting a target. Edge alignment is not the most important requirement for actually using a sword in its intended manner. I've taught seminars where people who've never swung a sword could easily cut a target after a couple hours of instruction. Cutting things is pretty easy. Cutting things in the proper manner so that you do not expose yourself and are poised to launch the next attack is a much more difficult endeavor.


Dude! Just because you know a few Japanese phrases does not mean you have a clue! The correct phrase is "ki ken tai ichi", and it means "the sword and the mind as one". It refers to recognizing an opening and moving properly to exploit that opening without the need to actively think about it. It has zero to do with proper edge alignment, which is something to which kendo only pays the slightest bit of attention.

and if you wish to take that attitude then so be it

I mis typed the way round it is and for that I am sorry however if you wish to debate japanese then so be it and it actually means spirit sword body as one but if you wish to argue then so be it

There is proper alignment in Kendo as strike with the wrong part of the shinai is kinda important but I guess that doesn't count !!! and yes there are only specific target areas (that was not always so but you will obviously know that)

Again I apologize for mis typing but if you wish to debate japanese then I am happy to do so ....I am no classical swordsman no ever have been but japanese I do speak,
 

Rat

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Sorry, forgot to address this one while I was ranting ...
Good edge alignment is not vital for sword fighting. It is vital for target cutting. Swords were created specifically to cut human beings, and they are terribly efficient at it. If I were to cut any part of your body with a poorly aligned sword cut, it would still be devastating and debilitating, and you'd most likely bleed to death from it without immediate medical intervention.

Getting close enough to cut your opponent without being cut yourself. THAT is what's fundamental in sword fighting.

P.S. That video showed horrible form. He needs proper instruction in cutting.

Pending sword type, i would leave it at they are less forgiving than a axe or club.

Fair enough for that one though, there is no point learning cutting if you cant actually get in to cut. Edit: I don't hold cutting to be the end all be all for sword fighting though, the basis i worked on was keno would teach you how to close the distance but might lack actual application with a katana. (Wording is off a little)

He isn't a teacher of it, it was just the first video i grabbed to explain the point and is a beginner for that matter.

(chronologically answered)
 

pgsmith

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He isn't a teacher of it, it was just the first video i grabbed to explain the point and is a beginner for that matter.

I understand. However, he suffers from that same mind set and makes my point for me. Simply cutting the target should never be your main objective, and can actually be counterproductive in learning proper swordsmanship. For example, in the video he is tightening up his entire shoulder and upper body on one side in order to try and generate enough tip speed to cut his target. This leaves him totally open and vulnerable, and so is bad swordsmanship. If he focused more on proper mechanics and keeping his body centered and relaxed rather than on simply trying to cut the target, he would eventually be able to generate superior tip speed without compromising his position. Unfortunately these mechanical errors are easily ingrained, and I've seen a number of people that ended up dropping out because it was too difficult for them to overcome their early habits.
 

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