Hapkido doesn't use patterns?

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@Dirty Dog Do you know why the first form is so flashy? Are patterns intended for higher levels?
 

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Were they created much later than in the TaeKwondo systems?

I doubt it. Taekwondo started out mostly using Shotokan forms. Hapkido is purportedly derived from Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu, so I would suppose they practiced the kata from that system.

@Dirty Dog Do you know why the first form is so flashy? Are patterns intended for higher levels?

No idea. You'd probably be better off asking that of someone who practices in that particular organization.
 
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I doubt it. Taekwondo started out mostly using Shotokan forms. Hapkido is purportedly derived from Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu, so I would suppose they practiced the kata from that system.

Sure but I meant from the time TaeKwondo used TKD forms.. I ask since black belt wiki made the claim that they are not generally part of the system, yet these are on Youtube from several sources, so they can't be that obscure in the world of Hapkido.
 
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I doubt it. Taekwondo started out mostly using Shotokan forms. Hapkido is purportedly derived from Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu, so I would suppose they practiced the kata from that system.
.

Not if you google the art.. Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu is primarily a grappling art. The patterns are basically all striking and blocking.

There is obviously huge emphasis on joint manipulation in Hapkido but both forms and sparring is more Kung Fu and TKD-ish.

The forms look mostly northern Kung Fu to me. We have a lot of kung fu guys in here so they can verify or deny this.
 
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My clip was from the World Hapkido Federation.... Biggest in the world, I think, and they do patterns...

And here's similiar ones


Black belt Wiki is good enough to use in the toilet.
 
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The forms look mostly northern Kung Fu to me. We have a lot of kung fu guys in here so they can verify or deny this.

You are referring to the YouTube video lined in the opening post, yes?

If so, those do not look like any Chinese martial art that I have seen. If I was shown those videos without any information, my guess would be that they are Korean. That is what they look like to me.
 

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You are referring to the YouTube video lined in the opening post, yes?

If so, those do not look like any Chinese martial art that I have seen. If I was shown those videos without any information, my guess would be that they are Korean. That is what they look like to me.
Not even close to Northern Kung Fu nor Southern for that matter. For us that form would have been like taking a lazy break. Northern Kung Fu would have been more lively with a lot of movement. Southern kung fu would have been an emphasis on strong deep stances and power even when moving slowly.

The only thing "kung fu" about it is that the form doesn't repeat right side then left side techniques. Which isn't saying much in terms of it being more one thing than another. But over all, definitely no hints of kung fu
 
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The only thing "kung fu" about it is that the form doesn't repeat right side then left side techniques. Which isn't saying much in terms of it being more one thing than another. But over all, definitely no hints of kung fu

Ok but some of the techniques in isolation such as the sprinting spin kick is distinctly Kung Fu, as is the circular emphasis of the art.
 

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Ok but some of the techniques in isolation such as the sprinting spin kick is distinctly Kung Fu, as is the circular emphasis of the art.
I would say no, although perhaps you are thinking more of Modern Wushu which was developed by the Chinese government as an exhibition competition and cultural art form back in the 1950s. That is the really flashy, acrobatic method. It was based on the older kung fu methods, but was removed from actual useful combat. It is not intended to be a viable form of combat. It is intended to be more like a martial-flavored gymnastics floor routine.
 

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I would say no, although perhaps you are thinking more of Modern Wushu which was developed by the Chinese government as an exhibition competition and cultural art form back in the 1950s. That is the really flashy, acrobatic method. It was based on the older kung fu methods, but was removed from actual useful combat. It is not intended to be a viable form of combat. It is intended to be more like a martial-flavored gymnastics floor routine.
I think the only real way to high light the difference is to show a northern kung fu form and a southern kung fu form and compare it to what he's seeing.
 
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I would say no, although perhaps you are thinking more of Modern Wushu which was developed by the Chinese government as an exhibition competition and cultural art form back in the 1950s. That is the really flashy, acrobatic method. It was based on the older kung fu methods, but was removed from actual useful combat. It is not intended to be a viable form of combat. It is intended to be more like a martial-flavored gymnastics floor routine.

There's more Kung Fu styles than atoms in the universe. I am referring to a particular branch that emphasises high kicks and spins
 
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I think the only real way to high light the difference is to show a northern kung fu form and a southern kung fu form and compare it to what he's seeing.

Do that then. I don't know which are legit and which aren't. I do remember watching 90s Kung Fu tapes of patterns bought from China Town and it looked very similiar to that.
 

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There's more Kung Fu styles than atoms in the universe. I am referring to a particular branch that emphasises high kicks and spins
I would be curious to see what that is. If you know the name of it, or can provide a video link, I would be interested in taking a look.

However, a jumping spin kick does not immediately say to me this is kung fu. My first impression, without first knowing more about it, would be more likely this is TKD.

In your earlier post you also mentioned that you felt the forms on that YouTube link were circular and thereby possibly of Northern Chinese origin. My impression was that they are not, at least not in any way that I would identify or associate with any Chinese methods. Those forms in that video link have a very strong Korean flavor, in my opinion.
 

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Do that then. I don't know which are legit and which aren't. I do remember watching 90s Kung Fu tapes of patterns bought from China Town and it looked very similiar to that.
Maybe you are thinking of Kenpo Karate?
 
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Maybe you are thinking of Kenpo Karate?

Nah he was dressed like a typical wushu performer. It might have very well been a wushu tape

Don't you think this guys tiger claw arm movements are very kung fu-ish? there's none of that in Karate katas.

 
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