Drawing blade under pressure?

frank raud

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I was having a discussion on knives and self defense on Facebook, I suggested that practicing the ability to actually get your weapon out while being attacked is something that should be practiced, to see if you favourite thumb stud, hole or flipper works under pressure. The reaction I got from one person was that was a crazy thing to do, you either had your knife out before things got nuts, or you create distance to allow you time to open your blade. Speed is not essential. Oh really?

I look at being able to draw your weapon under pressure as being similar to being able to punch/counterpunch while being attacked. It's great to be able to demonstrate and practice your favourite rib destroying punch from a static position, but can you make it work when the other guy is trying to take your head off?

Does anyone else practice drawing a knife while being attacked? Or am I that special kind of crazy?
 

Dirty Dog

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Sure, it's nice to have your weapon out before things get nuts - that might well prevent things from getting nuts in the first place.
And yes, creating distance to draw your weapon is also a fine idea. But it's much easier to create a little distance than a lot of distance. And the faster you can draw, the less distance you need to create.
Now, if I am reaching for a weapon, it is far more likely to be a gun than a knife, but the principles are the same.

However, none of this should be considered an opinion on whether or not you are, in fact, a special kind of crazy....
 

Buka

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Nah, speed in drawing your weapon isn't essential. Just say Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice. Even if you say it slow, I'm sure the bad guy will wait.

You ain't crazy, bro. Accessing your weapon, any kind of weapon, is key. We've even practiced drawing while grappling.
 

drop bear

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It depends what you are risking by doing it. It does not take many face punches to drop a dude.
 

hoshin1600

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I believe that a weapon can only be drawn when there is a lack of or a pause in attacking pressure. Sometimes there is space and sometimes not. I train to always scan and look for a weapon every time one of these intervals occur.
Yes I believe in training to draw the weapon to bring it into play. My own code of ethics says that a weapon should only be used when the disparity of force is great enough to warrant a deadly response. It should be assumed that in a deadly force encounter the level of stress is very high ( coopers,,red or Grossman ' gray).
Under that level of stress people often find it difficult to dial 911 or even remember that have a weapon.
I sure would hate to fumble it and drop it on the ground.
 

KangTsai

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I have my own technique of expertly quick-drawing my thumbstud folder by hooking/pressuring it with my trouser pockets. Much like an Emerson wave.
 

Tez3

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I have my own technique of expertly quick-drawing my thumbstud folder by hooking/pressuring it with my trouser pockets. Much like an Emerson wave.

Back or front pockets? I just think front pockets could be incredibly perilous to your 'health'.
 
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frank raud

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I have my own technique of expertly quick-drawing my thumbstud folder by hooking/pressuring it with my trouser pockets. Much like an Emerson wave.
I'm assuming tip up carry and pulling to the rear. You find that reliable enough on a quick draw?
 

drop bear

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So nobody considers a slow draw? So you can hang on to the thing while you are fending off impacts to the head?
 

Dirty Dog

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So nobody considers a slow draw? So you can hang on to the thing while you are fending off impacts to the head?

The longer it takes to draw, the longer the drawing hand is absolutely useless for fending off impacts. I cannot think of any reason you'd want to draw slowly.
 

drop bear

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Why not practice the draw so you can do it quickly?

I am conservative in street fights. If i can reduce a risk i will.

Even before i get in to a fight i like to stop, look and then hit the thing with some sort of plan.
 

KangTsai

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If you don't mind, what knife are you using, and how is the clip set up?
This one.
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drop bear

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Except you're more likely to get clocked upside the head while drawing slowly, which would seem to increase the risk of dropping it.
Am I? Wouldn't know. I assume i would draw inbetween head clocks. Or use foot work or something.
 
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