does japenese style karate have set techniques

suicide

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like kenpo kaju lima etc etc

you know like right parry right kick left rev punch and diffrent sequences and combos

or is it just
right punch a 1000 times

no disrespect if it works it works

and hope to someday go to japan and stay for a year and train with a kyokushin school
 

Bill Mattocks

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What exactly do you mean by saying 'Japanese style'? We teach the same here as there, for the most part.

For my style, Isshinryu, yes, there are set techniques.

Isshinryu has 15 upper body exercises and 8 lower body exercises. Then there are 8 empty hand kata and 3 weapons kata.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isshin-ryū
 
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i mean like a yellow belt technique : DELAYED SWORD (front - right and lapel grab)

or a orange belt technique : THRUSTING PRONGS _ Front Bear Hug, Arms Pinned
 

Bill Mattocks

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i mean like a yellow belt technique : DELAYED SWORD (front - right and lapel grab)

or a orange belt technique : THRUSTING PRONGS _ Front Bear Hug, Arms Pinned

Not in the way that you seem to mean.

We have a belt system, white through black, like most styles of karate. You earn advancement by meeting the requirements for that belt.

For example, I am a white belt - beginner. For me to earn my next belt, which is orange, I must master my fifteen upper body exercises and 8 lower body exercises and know them by their Japanese names. I must be able to at least perform the Sanchin kata and the Seisan kata. I must be able to count to 50 in Japanese. If I think I can do that, I tell my sensei, take a test, and if I pass to his satisfaction, I pay $5 and get a yellow belt.

More advanced belts require more time in grade as well as mastering other katas, and they have to be done properly at higher belts, not just stumbled through.

After black belt first dan, future promotions are based on merit, time in grade, and whatever else sensei thinks is important. It takes about nine years to make 1st dan in my dojo, according to sensei.

However, we are taught together. So I learn all the katas, all the self-defense moves, all the techniques - starting from day one. I am already sparring, and doing bo-bo and bo-sai kumite. Nothing is held back in my dojo just because I am a beginner. If I feel uncomfortable with a weapon, I do not have to participate, I can practice something else on my own.

Is that what you were asking?
 

Grenadier

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Many Japanese and Okinawan Karate systems have what are known as "Ippon Kumite," which means one point sparring. The attacker throws one technique, or one series of techniques, and the defender defends accordingly.

There are several levels of ippon kumite. At the beginner levels, the attacker announces what he is going to do (and from a set list of techniques). The defender acknowledges when he is ready, and defends from a set list of techniques. This teaches both the attacker and defender proper distancing, along with understanding the techniques.

At the more advanced levels, the may be more freedom on both the attacker's and defender's side, to call and perform techniques that aren't on the list.

At the advanced levels, ippon kumite generally becomes a simple exchange of one technique (or series), no announcements, etc.
 
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sord of ... i meant like what do you do against a right step through punch ? do you just block it or do you continue with a left palm strike right rev punch to a right rev kick ?

or is it right block to a right punch
 

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As I understand what you are asking is in kenpo you have "Delayed Sword" which is a SPECIFIC response for a SPECIFIC attack. Some styles of karate have one and three (or more) point kumite. These are prearranged drills to teach specific principles.

To dig further and come up with a "self-defense" technique like in kenpo you have to look to the kata and find them. The series of moves are going to be those prearranged technique sequences before moving onto another opponent. Each kata originally was it's own "style", a karate master might only know one or two but know them so well and be able to apply them to all situations. Also, each kata was designed for a specific purpose to deal with a specific scenario. In an effort to "preserve" katas they were added and collected by Funakoshi and also Mabuni so they would not be lost, this is the reason there are so many of them and there is alot of overlap.

Just a bit of history, Prof. Chow was one of the first to take the applications out of the forms/katas and train them just as set techniques. This varied greatly from the methods as previously taught where you would spend lots of time working the kata to pull these techs out and unlock the deeper applications. Many people after that started to do the same thing, such as Parker and Emperado (one of the founders of kajukenbo) who both studied under Chow.

Because the techs are found within the kata, you can use the same motion for different applications and this is where some of the confusion about the use of kata comes into play. For example, in a kata I might have a down block followed by a punch. In kenpo you would know exactly what that move was for, it would be a downblock and a punch and you would know the attack it was designed for. In kata at it's basic level it would be a block/punch, at a deeper level you could use the downblock as part of a countergrab and manipulation.

Since is was brought up, Isshin-ryu kind of split the middle. Some of the "beginner kata" that were found in other styles were eliminated and the upper body basics were put into place to take the place of these katas (if you look and compare the 15 upper body basics are VERY comparable to Funakoshi's "Ten no Kata" that he created for new students). These are still very closely related to ippon kumite, which have a specific purpose of training the karateka to interupt his attacker so he can take the initiative and avoid a continous attack against him. Tatsuo also had 45 "self-defense techniques" that were also originally taught that were pulled from the kata and broken into smaller parts to work on.

Hope this helps out some, short answer is "yes", but you have to spend the time to find them and practice them as such.
 

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sord of ... i meant like what do you do against a right step through punch ? do you just block it or do you continue with a left palm strike right rev punch to a right rev kick ?

or is it right block to a right punch

Oh, I see. Well, we get taught all kinds of techniques. Mostly, whatever works.

I don't know what a 'right step through' punch is, but if it is a right-hand reverse punch (sounds like it), then the choices I've learned so far would be:

1) middle-body block right, backfist right.
2) middle-body block right, punch left.
3) middle-body block right, trap right, pull attackers arm to my right waist, kick knees out.
4) middle-body block right, trap right, pull attackers arm to my right waist, punch left.
5) hook punch (as block) left, backfist left.
6) dead hand block down right, sidestep, kick attacker's right side (leg, pelvis, ribcage).

Thinking about it, I guess there are 50 or so that I've seen so far. Some are easier than others to accomplish, and I'm not very good at any of them yet, but it seems that there are a lot of potential responses to any set strike. Mostly, I like the block, set, trap arm, take them off balance, and take the legs out method. Works well for me.

We call the middle body block 'chudan uke' and it can be hard or soft. If you block soft and lay the right hand over backward over the attacker's punching arm, then you can reverse your hand position, grab, and pull straight down towards your obi while pivoting your hops for leverage. That puts their face in your obi and blammo.
 

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Some of the "beginner kata" that were found in other styles were eliminated and the upper body basics were put into place to take the place of these katas (if you look and compare the 15 upper body basics are VERY comparable to Funakoshi's "Ten no Kata" that he created for new students).

We practice 'takioku' kata which is not actually an isshinryu kata, but it contains the 15 upper body exercises in it.

We also practice the 15 and 8 basic exercises against each other as you said. One guy throws a seikan tsuki and the other guy steps back, does chudan uke seiken tsuki as a response, or tegate barai nukite.
 

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What exactly do you mean by saying 'Japanese style'? We teach the same here as there, for the most part.

For my style, Isshinryu, yes, there are set techniques.

Isshinryu has 15 upper body exercises and 8 lower body exercises. Then there are 8 empty hand kata and 3 weapons kata.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isshin-ryū

Bill-I will help you out here. There are indeed 8 empty hand kata, but there are 3 bo kata, 3 sai kata, and 1 tonfa kata.

i mean like a yellow belt technique : DELAYED SWORD (front - right and lapel grab)

or a orange belt technique : THRUSTING PRONGS _ Front Bear Hug, Arms Pinned


As far as your question goes, school vary. In my school, I am teaching Chito-ryu and Isshinryu, and I also have a set of SD sets that I also teach. They are similar to one-step and three-step sparring, we call them Ippon Kumite. My C-ryu Instructor's Instructor added several of them and each instructor has added and so on. We train them seperately and they have help transmit a more practical approach to SD for our students.

Hope this helps.
 

Bill Mattocks

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Bill-I will help you out here. There are indeed 8 empty hand kata, but there are 3 bo kata, 3 sai kata, and 1 tonfa kata.

Sorry, my bad. Newbie here. From what I've been told, to reach 1st dan BB, three weapons kata are required in addition to the 8 empty hand. I guess I didn't ask what comes after that. I have been going twice a week since late Sep 08, have only seen 1 sai kata, 2 bo, and no tonfa. My sensei is Dan Holloway.

http://www.isshinryu.nxs.net/Members/HollowayDan.htm
 

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In Cha San Ryu, there are 5 self-defense techniques required for each belt level, as well as a few grab techniques/knife defenses/gun defenses/etc. (depending on level), at least one kata, and for intermediate/advanced ranks a weapon kata.

Our self-defense techniques don't have names like Kenpo techniques do (which threw me off at first!)...but for instance, #10 is a defense for a right straight punch--step back with a right inward block, right straight chop, left punch, right thrust kick (the flow reminds me of Five Swords).

The only exceptions are #24 and #25, which are to be the student's personal techniques that s/he develops. They have us do this so that we can prove that we know the mechanics of what we're doing--that we're not going to try to punch someone in the face and immediately pull their head down into a knee, or some other combination that just wouldn't work in real life.

~Ani
 

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This one is straight out of Japan.

A series of physical exercises that gets more hardcore.

Imagine the finished product of hard training.

 
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StrongFighter

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Hi Suicide, as far the set of techniques go ... This one is from my bookmarked favorites.

Kazuyoshi Ishii (born in 1953) is the master of Seidokan Karate and the founder of K-1.

When he was 16, he started to learn Kyokushin karate from Hideyuki Ashihara, who was a well-known legendary Karate master.

Black Belt Magazine honored Ishii as "Man of the Year" in January 2003.

What he says in his Karate theory is, in short,

1. Aim at the opponent's liver, which is very effective to knock him down.
2. In order to strike the liver, and also the other vulnerable points like chin or temple, keep the opponent's consciousness away from the point before striking.
3. In order to keep the opponent's consciousness away, use diagonal combination. That is, to hit both ends of a diagonal.
4. When you hit preliminaries, you don't need strong hits as to knock him down, but painful ones.

Here are four videos that I think you will understand when you put them together along with karate instruction.

This will begin to make sense, just watch and go along with them and again, this is straight out of Japan.




 
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is there any youtbe videos of the Tatsuo 45 "self-defense techniques" ?

i got the KARATE TECHNIQUE AND SPIRIT by Tadashi Nakamura ( seido karate )

: the training of body mind and spirit together in order to realize the fullness of human potential.
 

Chris Parker

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Hi,

There are techniques similar to what you are describing in at least one system. Tani-ha Shito Ryu Shukokai Karate teaches a series of drilled combinations, getting progressively more complex and requiring more skill as you progress through the ranks. But they aren't techniques against specific attacks, more a way of training combinations like a boxer. And that's not surprising.

Tani Sensei was a successful tournament competitor who trained in Shito Ryu. After a lot of experience, he started to put together what he found was the most successful in tournament conditions, including shorter stances and Western style hand techniques. In time this became Shukokai Karate-Do, later taking the more formal name Tani-ha Shito Ryu Shukokai Karate-Do, incorporating training drills based on boxing combinations as listed above, as well as the more traditional (and much longer) kata, ippon kumite, nippon kumite, and drilling individual techniques (strikes, blocks, kicks etc). Application techniques are taught based on the instructors knowledge and experience.
 

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is there any youtbe videos of the Tatsuo 45 "self-defense techniques" ?

i got the KARATE TECHNIQUE AND SPIRIT by Tadashi Nakamura ( seido karate )

: the training of body mind and spirit together in order to realize the fullness of human potential.

Not sure if these are the ones you are looking for ?


 
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sometimes something so basic is so full of insight thanks :ultracool
 
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