Discussing A Students Limitations Before Training

K31

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I was wondering what the policy was at people's schools about having an interview or even a questionnaire to ask students if they have any limitations prior to beginning training. I always thought it was strange that I was never asked if I had any medical conditions or injuries before I began training. I would have thought that that was a CYA practice that would have been mandated by insurance companies. Also, do any schools out there have yearly one-on-onnes with students to talk to them about how they feel their training is going?
 

bluekey88

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It's not something I've encountered, but I think it's a good idea.

Peace,
Erik
 

Kenpo17

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At my school, when you first start you have two private classes with the owner and head instructor, just to get a feel for the art and the teaching style you can expect in every other class. After your second private lesson you can choose whether or not you want to stay with the art and if so, you will than join the other students for a normal class with instructors like myself, you are no longer private with the owner.
 

stickarts

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We include this during their registration. If there is an issue I want to know about it. On occaision I have required a DR. note before letting a student train if I see a potential problem. Limitations are discussed.
 

NPTKD

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Our insurance company provided one. It is mandatory before signing up. as for the one on one. I make it a point to talk to each student or parent once a month on that suject. If a student misses class for a week or so, I'm on the phone wanting to know if everythings going alright. Sometimes it hard and some people may slip thru the cracks by its only my wife and I and with 130 plus its hard.
 

NPTKD

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and we offer a three week course to let people get the feel for the school and really to see if they are a good fit for the school. You know one bad apple.....
 

jks9199

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We'll talk to new students, and want to know about any major concerns. I don't care about most of their medical history -- but I do want to know about anything that will interfere with or affect their training like joint injuries, or if they've got an issue like hemophilia. I won't stop an adult from training, though I may insist on some precautions, and have ruled out certain students from specific training activities.
 

granfire

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well, I have seen a gentleman start out, wondering why he would wear shoes, then not see him for a long time then see him without legs. Not knowing his story I'd guess diabetes.

The instructor's nephew has a pacemaker. He can't do push-ups....

As instructor you have to know those things (I had a kid in class I strongly suspected to be autistic)

We sign a release form that we don't suit should we get hurt, but no disclosure of ailments beyond that, but as school owner and instructor you really need to know. Granted, even a direct question will not yield a direct answer at times (I pondered how I could politely asked mom if the teachers or doctors had suggested autism....)
 

goingd

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I usually ask new parents if there is anything I should know before their children start classes.
Now, regardless of my efforts, I more often than not get very riley kids, and I drag through the months trying to work with them until finally their parents so casually bring up, "Oh, by the way, my son has ADHD and his medication wears off by the time he gets to class."
... Yyyyeah...
 

Earl Weiss

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1. The liability waiver / release form has a line for disclosure of medical conditions.
2. Tournament regs require an abbreviateion for medical conditions(i.e. epilepsy, cardiac, allergies to meds etc. )etc. to be written on the inside of the lapel. That way if a competitor goes down the med personnel immediately check the inside of the lapel.
3. Thinking of implementing #2 for all students.
 

granfire

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I usually ask new parents if there is anything I should know before their children start classes.
Now, regardless of my efforts, I more often than not get very riley kids, and I drag through the months trying to work with them until finally their parents so casually bring up, "Oh, by the way, my son has ADHD and his medication wears off by the time he gets to class."
... Yyyyeah...

Oh, the 'Karadee Class' is the majikal cure, don't you know?!

Then again, it's a small sign that parents try to do some good by the kid. Can't keep'em doped up all the time. But it would help to know before hand so you can adjust the workout.
 

Laurentkd

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1. The liability waiver / release form has a line for disclosure of medical conditions.
2. Tournament regs require an abbreviateion for medical conditions(i.e. epilepsy, cardiac, allergies to meds etc. )etc. to be written on the inside of the lapel. That way if a competitor goes down the med personnel immediately check the inside of the lapel.
3. Thinking of implementing #2 for all students.


That does seem like a good idea. It doesn't bring up any privacy/discrimination problems that you know of?
 

goingd

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Oh, the 'Karadee Class' is the majikal cure, don't you know?!

Then again, it's a small sign that parents try to do some good by the kid. Can't keep'em doped up all the time. But it would help to know before hand so you can adjust the workout.

I have no problem with having them in my class off their meds (personally, I would not put my own kids on that stuff). It is just frustrating not to have parents tell me. They all say, "His teacher or therapist recommended Taekwondo," and they assume it is effortless... Majikal as you put it.
 

granfire

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I have no problem with having them in my class off their meds (personally, I would not put my own kids on that stuff). It is just frustrating not to have parents tell me. They all say, "His teacher or therapist recommended Taekwondo," and they assume it is effortless... Majikal as you put it.


Not to go into these things medical, but some kids do benefit from the pharmaceutical crutch to help them overcome this. But the US is pretty high up the latter on prescribing really high doses of these things.

But that is really another issue.

but it is needlessly tiring to deal with this when a quick 'Oh, By the way' could give you tools to deal with it in a different manner all together. Easier on the kids (who just can't help themselves, MA is probably the only time the whole week they actually get to move about!)
 

jks9199

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Not to go into these things medical, but some kids do benefit from the pharmaceutical crutch to help them overcome this. But the US is pretty high up the latter on prescribing really high doses of these things.

But that is really another issue.

but it is needlessly tiring to deal with this when a quick 'Oh, By the way' could give you tools to deal with it in a different manner all together. Easier on the kids (who just can't help themselves, MA is probably the only time the whole week they actually get to move about!)
We've got teachers and schools "diagnosing" and all-but-prescribing kids, rather than referring them to have appropriate treatment determined. I've heard of cases where schools refused to allow kids back until they were medicated... with no regard for what the actual medical doctors and specialists determined was appropriate.

Martial arts training (or any other regular activity with inherent discipline demands) can be part of a plan for a kid... but only part. And, really, it needs to be the right teacher, with the right experience set to work with the kids. I've got one student who's ADD or ADHD (I don't know the specifics)... it takes some patience to work with him some days. It's a good example of a situation that a teacher needs to be aware of, without needing all the details.
 

granfire

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We've got teachers and schools "diagnosing" and all-but-prescribing kids, rather than referring them to have appropriate treatment determined. I've heard of cases where schools refused to allow kids back until they were medicated... with no regard for what the actual medical doctors and specialists determined was appropriate.

Yeah, I know, that is the infuriating part.

Martial arts training (or any other regular activity with inherent discipline demands) can be part of a plan for a kid... but only part. And, really, it needs to be the right teacher, with the right experience set to work with the kids. I've got one student who's ADD or ADHD (I don't know the specifics)... it takes some patience to work with him some days. It's a good example of a situation that a teacher needs to be aware of, without needing all the details.

Exactly. it let's you tailor class around the issue better. It's easier when you know what it is.
 

Earl Weiss

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That does seem like a good idea. It doesn't bring up any privacy/discrimination problems that you know of?

Not that I know of. As far as privacy goes, no one except instructors get info unless there is a problem, and then a look at the inside of the lapel gives you an idea of what type of assistance or issues exist. I think that outweighs any privacy concerns, particularly if there is an allergy issue, the info on the inside of the lapel could truly be lifesaving.
 

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