dabbling in the arts

jarrod

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i pretty much have my mind made up on this issue, so i'm not looking for advice so much as the general thoughts of other martial artists, especially instructors.

there are several arts that i have an interest in, mostly for historical or esoteric reasons. but at the core my love of the arts lies with grappling followed closely by sport-oriented striking.

what i'm planning on doing starting next month, is picking an art to sort of "play" with in addition to my core training. meaning i'll train once a week or so, probably for a few months before exploring something else. i've decided to stay away from koryu & highly traditional arts, not out of a lack of interest, but out of respect for the commitment level such arts often require.

i was wondering if anyone else has done this, or what everyone's general thoughts were. as a grappling coach, i've had several people from more traditional arts come in for a few months to gain a bit of familiarity with the ground then return their full focus to their main style. i've never had a problem with this & was happy to share what knowledge i could with them until they moved on.

one other question...are there any arts (aside from the koryu) which would especially frown on this approach? i don't intend to step on any toes if i can help it.

jf
 

Daniel Sullivan

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I think that the crosstraining issue can often be more related to the individual teacher than to the art itself.

Personally, I see nothing wrong with it, provided you can do so in a way that augments your training and works synergistically with the art you already practice. Some arts are so similar that their subtle differences can cause bleed over between the two and one can hinder you in practice of the other if you are doing both simultaneously (say, TKD and Shotokan).

Otherwise, I see it as a good thing.

Daniel
 

searcher

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I have been in many schools and had the fortune to train with some outstanding instructors. I don't and have never had any problems with this approach to training. I am actually all for it. I have tried the jump from one school to another way of doingit, but it has never been for a few months. I always end up staying for a few years in most cases, Hapkido is an exception(the instructor was horrible).

IMO, as long as you don't get into a contract and you keep yoru core training alive, you can have some great experience. But please have a good idea of why you are in a particular school/style and what you hope to ge out of it. It will make the training worth while.
 

JadecloudAlchemist

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Some traditional teachers want their students to not engage in other types of training for various reasons. Things like Koryu are steaped in tradition and cultural mannerism which over rules self defense.

I don't know of any style that frowns upon it but hardcore traditionalist might which goes back into the classical debate of cross training.
 

shihansmurf

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I say go for it, but I must echo Daniel's comment about being cautious in regards to cross training in an art that is similar to what you are already working in. The similarities will be confusing and, I think, actively work to slow your progress, more so than enhance it. Look for something, assuming that you have'nt already got something in mind, that teaches a different skillset and the experience should prove to be rewarding.

Mark
 

seasoned

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Back when I was coming up through the ranks, there was a judo club sharing dojo space with us. They came on after us, so they would come early to watch our workouts. There was many friendships and much sharing done. I have stated in the past that as long as we keep our core base art intact, anything else will only add fun while at the same time open doors of opportunity to expand. Go for it.
 

still learning

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Hello, JUDO....it a great art to learn....and it is more than you think! ..Aloha
 
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