Control in the Martial Arts

SensibleManiac

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How much control do you exert over your physiology when you train?
Have you ever asked yourself this question?
I mean deeply thought about how much control you have over your techniques?
The reason I ask this question is because I see so many martial artists out there who:
-Don't seem to have great control over their technical skills.
-Don't seem to improve their skills over time.

Now don't get me wrong I'm not slamming people or trying to start a negative rant.
The truth is simply that although I see some awesome martial artists out there, the majority of the ones I see, especially some who have been training for years, don't seem to really improve.
I find this especially true when some have reached a decent level of proficiency and then they suddenly stop improving.
Could this be that their standards just aren't that high?
Or could it be that they just give up on improvement?

I don't know.

It's just that for me improvement has always been a big part of my training, and the reason I've sometimes stopped training is that I just didn't feel that the instructor I was training under could continue to contribute to my improvement.
Again I also understand that sometimes other life commitments get in the way and we can't always get around them but sometimes those can only be excuses.

What do you think the solution to these improvement obstacles can be?

Have you ever left where you were training because of a similar situation?

What are some of the best training methods you have found for developing control in your skills?
Even though I train primarily in BJJ, I am asking this about martial arts in general as I also train in striking, although secondary to grappling.

I'd like responses from practitionners of different arts as they might have ideas I've never thought about.
To any instructors out there, is there a way that you motivate students to be more aware of control in their training and movement?

Thanks in advance for any ideas and thoughts.
 

Rich Parsons

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How much control do you exert over your physiology when you train?

I try to always have control over my body. When I train and when I work and when I play. How I breath and move and react.


Have you ever asked yourself this question?

Yes, I have. I asked why is it so difficult to scuba dive or snorkel all it requires is to only breath through the mouth, while I breath through my nose in general and in through my nose and out through my mouth when I am trying to control my pulse and blood pressure et al.


I mean deeply thought about how much control you have over your techniques?

Yes, I break them down in my mind and also while I train. I work with others of superior timing and skill set and when that is not available I work with peers or those less than myself. I try to adjust my timing to theirs which improves my over all control of my own techniques and helps me learn as well even working with someone of less skill. It also helps to bring those of lessor or equal skill up closer to yours or with yours.


The reason I ask this question is because I see so many martial artists out there who:
-Don't seem to have great control over their technical skills.
-Don't seem to improve their skills over time.

Now don't get me wrong I'm not slamming people or trying to start a negative rant.
The truth is simply that although I see some awesome martial artists out there, the majority of the ones I see, especially some who have been training for years, don't seem to really improve.
I find this especially true when some have reached a decent level of proficiency and then they suddenly stop improving.

The number of professional Baseball players and only a few that hit over 300. While you have all those that play in some league over the country that are not even good enough for the minors but they play. The same is true for hockey and basketball and tennis and football and soccer (* Football in Europe *) and other sports or areas that require physical activity.

I know that I do lots of driving in my job. I am not a professional racer, but how many laps have you done over 100 mph with one hand or no hands on the wheel I know I have done enough not to count. But, I am not of the skill set of those that do it for hours on end at 180 mph or greater. But my skill set far out weighs those that I meet on the road.

How many, have the access to tiles and track to test out braking maneuvers and or access to trips that put you in cold spots in cold weather and hot spots in hot weather to test? Not many I would guess. And even amongst them I am not the top in any field. But those that are, usually only the top in their specialty area.


Could this be that their standards just aren't that high?

It could be.

It could be that they learn only when they are being taught to improve and their instructor might not know how to teach them to improve. They might only be able to guide natural talent not improve it.

It could be other issues as well.


Or could it be that they just give up on improvement?

It could be they give up or that they are satisfied.

It could be they looked around and said they are good enough for what they want. They might be satisfied. I grant that is possible.



I don't know.

It's just that for me improvement has always been a big part of my training, and the reason I've sometimes stopped training is that I just didn't feel that the instructor I was training under could continue to contribute to my improvement.
Again I also understand that sometimes other life commitments get in the way and we can't always get around them but sometimes those can only be excuses.

If a person's learning mode is one way and their are no instructors in the area for them to learn from then they might be able to not learn or improve. I have no experience with leaving an instructor that could not help or guide or teach me. I have been lucky in that aspect. Unlucky in that two of them have been taken from me and their other students.


What do you think the solution to these improvement obstacles can be?

As I Stated, open minds and willingness to learn or work with others and train their pace to improve your skill set at their level. Some can just do it at the best level they cannot tone it down or if they can they have to tone it down to a point where they do not think they are learning. But even moving the slowest possible and working timing with two people like this can improve ones' insight.

Have you ever left where you were training because of a similar situation?

No.


What are some of the best training methods you have found for developing control in your skills?

Going slow. Working with others. Teaching others.


Even though I train primarily in BJJ, I am asking this about martial arts in general as I also train in striking, although secondary to grappling.

I'd like responses from practitionners of different arts as they might have ideas I've never thought about.

I train and teach in two different FMA's. Modern Arnis has empty hand, weapon (stick/blade) and standing grappling with some ground work (* nothing on the level of Jujitsu *). The second being Balintawak which concentrates on Stick work but it translates to other weapons including empty hands.


To any instructors out there, is there a way that you motivate students to be more aware of control in their training and movement?



Thanks in advance for any ideas and thoughts.
 

tshadowchaser

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I try to control what I do in practice as much as I possibly can.
Yes I have asked myself if I am doing this and I must admit that I have had to say no at times. That is another learning experience that I try to improve upon.

As Rich said Going slow, working with others, and teaching are ways that can help one to better control and learn the development of control. Taking the time to analyze what you are doing or are about to do instead of just doing it because you know how or have done it a hundred times before is a mental check that will improve ones control.
 

7starmarc

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As far as improvement is concerned. Yes, I think natural aptitude is part of the equation, another is the desire to work hard enough to achieve the next level.

I was just talking to my dad about this this weekend. He is not a martial artist, but he is an avid tennis player. He stated that he was able to play at a level that satisfied him, and that playing at a higher level would require more work and more risk of injury than he was willing to invest. The bottom line was that he was achieving what he wanted to in tennis - activity, social interaction, and fun. He had no reason to strive for anything more.

I'm sure many who practice martial arts are just the same.

I stated that I didn't necessarily agree that he should stop trying to improve. With improvement in skill comes efficiency, the overall decrease in likelihood of injury, etc. In martial arts, also, is the question of how good is good enough? That depends on your reason for doing them. If self defense is a significant aspect, then I would submit that, while there will probably always be people who can beat you, you can at least strive to shrink that number as much as possible. Of course, in tennis, if you lose, you just shake hands and leave the court. In self defense, losing can mean a lot more.
 

JadecloudAlchemist

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How much control do you exert over your physiology when you train?
Control is very important in my art. Feeling the shifting of weight having the correct alignment,Etc,Etc.


I mean deeply thought about how much control you have over your techniques?
If you have correct balance,correct placement,correct theory and correct practice then your technique will fall into place correctly.

What do you think the solution to these improvement obstacles can be?
To keep training. You will discover new methods to apply your technique. You may find your reaction time is quicker. Always someone better than you so you might as well be the best you can be. The only way for that is to train more.

What are some of the best training methods you have found for developing control in your skills?
Blind fold, Training with more experience partners.
 

bowser666

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I am always measuring my control in performing my techniques. If I notice that control is not as good as it should be then that tells me I need more practice!
 

Kacey

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I can't really add much to Rich's answer... he pretty much covered anything I would say.
 

Darren

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How much control do you exert over your physiology when you train?
Have you ever asked yourself this question?
I mean deeply thought about how much control you have over your techniques?
The reason I ask this question is because I see so many martial artists out there who:
-Don't seem to have great control over their technical skills.
-Don't seem to improve their skills over time.

Now don't get me wrong I'm not slamming people or trying to start a negative rant.
The truth is simply that although I see some awesome martial artists out there, the majority of the ones I see, especially some who have been training for years, don't seem to really improve.
I find this especially true when some have reached a decent level of proficiency and then they suddenly stop improving.
Could this be that their standards just aren't that high?
Or could it be that they just give up on improvement?

I don't know.

It's just that for me improvement has always been a big part of my training, and the reason I've sometimes stopped training is that I just didn't feel that the instructor I was training under could continue to contribute to my improvement.
Again I also understand that sometimes other life commitments get in the way and we can't always get around them but sometimes those can only be excuses.

What do you think the solution to these improvement obstacles can be?

Have you ever left where you were training because of a similar situation?

What are some of the best training methods you have found for developing control in your skills?
Even though I train primarily in BJJ, I am asking this about martial arts in general as I also train in striking, although secondary to grappling.

I'd like responses from practitionners of different arts as they might have ideas I've never thought about.
To any instructors out there, is there a way that you motivate students to be more aware of control in their training and movement?

Thanks in advance for any ideas and thoughts.
IMHO its the person training, in the mini series band of brothers you had the Sobal his last name, as the drill instructor read up on him, he trained Easy company very very harsh and tough trainer!!! But he could not led the company into battle but he trained those guys into the toughest soldiers the 101st had at the time!!
 

Holmejr

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Conversely, we have a couple students that definitely lack control and its always bit of a challenge to practice with them. Which is actually good for advanced students and instructors. Keeps you on your toes.
 

Darren

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Control with me came from training, training, training, sparring, sparring and more training and sparring!! And not wanting to hurt my class mates!!!!
 

MadMartigan

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I start the conversation about control with white belt students while teaching their first basic stances. They're all probably sick of me demonstrating moving between stances and hearing me say 'if you can't control your feet on the ground, how could you possibly control them in the air' (usually then accompanied by a kick an inch or two from their temple to drive the point home).
The goal is to teach them early to invest their effort in control of the whole body.
 

tkdroamer

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I start the conversation about control with white belt students while teaching their first basic stances. They're all probably sick of me demonstrating moving between stances and hearing me say 'if you can't control your feet on the ground, how could you possibly control them in the air' (usually then accompanied by a kick an inch or two from their temple to drive the point home).
The goal is to teach them early to invest their effort in control of the whole body.
To put an exclamation point on this demonstration, I kick twice. Once with the ball of the foot and, using the other leg, with the top of the foot in quick succession.
 

Jimmythebull

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to me it織s lack of coordination & lack of fitness ( muscle control )
 

Jimmythebull

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infact this is why deeper muscles need to be trained. In a karate dojo or whatever most Instructors are not knowledgable about anatomy.
 
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