Community Ed Sanchinryu

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mito

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I guess Im still a student of Sanchin Ryu and can provide some inside perspective. Ive been around for 10-ish years. First let me say, the actual karate/movements/etc are good. It accomplishes what needs to no more, no less.

My concern is in the business side of the house. When Bill Adams was running the show less went wrong. Classes were started for new instructors. New instructors were tutored. Belts/promotions were sent on time (normally). Cliques were broken apart. But once Bill left (and Im not going to spread rumors as to why) and the boys took over, things broke down. First problems with belts arriving a little late. Then never at all. Phone calls would go unanswered. Emails unanswered. About the only time you could get a response was when it involved the office getting money.

The cliques have taken over. There is a group of young, male masters (including 4th degree on up) who always seem to be together. Heaven forbid if you talk to one of them w/o be spoken to first. If youre over 14 or so you are politely shunned and then politely told go away and finally they will either walk off or tell you to go away. I had one of my kids come up crying after this happened to him. He left the style a few weeks later. These young male masters have somehow taken over.


Im on my way out. Looking for something new. Id love to see Sanchin Ryu prosper. The ideas behind it are fantastic. The karate is good. The business is needs help. The way it is today Sanchin Ryu wont be around in 10 years. Its sad. So Im looking for a new style suggestions?


PS:
Shidan. So you actually got to speak with Master Dearman. Lucky you didnt walk away crying. Ive seen at least 3 people cry after he has spoken with them and it wasnt because they couldnt get a promotion or something superficial. He basically called them stupid. And regarding the physical abilities. Im just not even going to go there. If a person with a physical disability wants to learn more power to him/herbut that person should not be made a physical example of how to do Sanchin Ryu. It happens all the time. They even get promoted faster than most because they are so mentally and spiritual knowledgeable. Lot of BS if you ask me.


Punisher. I know who you are and you are one of the few people I truly admire inside of Sanchin Ryu. Youre a good guy. Dont change and dont let them change you. The style needs more of you running about, dont think thatll happen.
 
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With all due respect,

No one here truly understands the nature of the Sanchin-Ryu Philosophy here from your comments on names of kata to the very impatient complaining about not studying weapons early on. The negitive energy in your voice is not welcome in the Sanchin world:
The name Sanchin, meaning three battles, is interpreted as the battle to unify the mind, body, and spirit​
Karate for us is more than a form, a kata fist, hand or foot but a away of life. As for you, you clam on encountering shady unclear history nothing has been coverd up as you will find down to the emblem Isshin Ryu is one of the roots of are art although many martial arts are great and have rich history. Many people are drawn into martial arts out of ego and have a very western way of thinking meshing many ideals and techniques insead of dedicating theirselves to one.​
Understand before I stop that Sanchin-Ryu has traditional setting in the respective Okanawan legacy. As for the slander on the permotion of a master no matter who it is or what age the individual is the one who grows time size or strength, age or athletic ability are not factors in defending ones self. Not factors in growing in Sanchin-Ryu as long as your heart beats the battle to unify the mind, body, and spirit in this art form lives on.​
any Q? EMAIL ME stratacon_hq@yahoo.com
 

dlentz

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I have recently joined this post and have not had the opportunity to express my opinions until now. I have studied Sanchin-Ryu for only 3 years and I am fairly new to the style. I am 32 years old and have never tried another form of MA so I do not have a good base for comparison.

However, I must share with you my observations and experiences with this school in response to some postings that I have read. In three years, I have enjoyed class very much. I attend one class weekly for two hours and also visit another local class, permitting 4 hours of class study per week. Most of my workouts are done at home which is obviously encouraged.

I have met most of the masters involved in this style and few are young. The masters that are young are masters for good reasons. The instructors and Masters struggle to remember all of the names of the students; however, I have been impressed to find that most remember after one or two meetings. Knowing many of them personally, they are now my friends and a great group of individuals who are very friendly and caring. If one were to act snobbish or to walk away from or insult a student, they would receive a private training lesson from a higher ranking master immediately!

I have met CGM Dearman only twice. Once for the first time at a workshop, at which we only paused our workout for some verbal instruction and water needs. He held a polite and inquisitive conversation with me for several minutes and hugged me before we parted ways. The second time, we spoke kindly over a glass of water; he remembered my name to my surprise and was constantly interrupted by children who wanted to speak with him. To which he was very gentle and kind as if they were his own. This was after class, so this type of behavior was permitted as it would not be during class.

I have attended many classes and have never seen mistreatment of any student, nor have I seen a Sensei allow children to run amok.

I am not calling anyone a liar, I only wish that they would give it another chance, perhaps visit another class. The class they attended was not taught the way it should be and would be frowned upon.

No one is getting rich from Sanchin-Ryu. The Senseis volunteer to teach classes, the organization is non-profit and it is taught that other martial arts are wonderful arts to learn. This is not a cult as some have said; although at times it is like family. The website http://www.sanchinsystems.com/ does sell gear, the profits from which do go to the dojo, which is not non-profit; however, they are not getting rich selling GIs for $28. They are very good people and care about the students; I do not mind helping them pay the bills through gear sales. By the way, it is not permitted to wear GIs or belts outside of the dojo as this is a sign of disrespect.

Unfortunately, I am only able to respond to questions on a very basic level, though I will try my best to respond to all inquiries. I am beginning my study, at a level of 3rd brown, I am not very smart. If I am unable to answer any questions about Sanchin-Ryu, I will save the question for class and ask my Sensei and get back to you.

Be fair, be kind and open-minded, for bitterness hinders all study.

PS, Sanchinka of the water; loved your post.
 

tenphse

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I feel the need to comment on the content of this thread. My background in the martial arts is primarily in TKD, but I have studied Judo, Kenpo, and Sanchin-ryu. I applaud the work and concept of Sanchin-ryu and CGM Dearman. To use the qualifying terminology used elsewhere in the post, I am prior military, served in a combat zone, prior law enforcement, and a highly educated professional. I also fought and competed in very limited number of tournaments in days long past. Just to let everyone know, that doesnt make what ever style I study more legitimate.

I laude the efforts to bring a self defense program into the schools and to make it accessible in a way that is non-threatening and positive. I also think that teaching situational awareness is an outstanding pursuit, great for teaching adults and worthy of being in our schools.

That being said, in my opinion, Sanchin-ryu is worthless as a self-defense system. I also think that teaching as self-defense to people who dont know any better is good way to get people hurt. When it comes down to it, martial arts is about combat. It isnt about self-esteem, if you want that study something else you can feel accomplished in, it isnt about discipline, if you want the join the military, it isnt even about exercise because you could go and buy a treadmill. Self-esteem, discipline and exercise are important and come from the study of martial arts, but in the end it all comes down to if you can apply a strategy and techniques to survive the situation. So when you are taught a strategy that is flawed and techniques that will not work, you are going to get hurt bad.

I studied Sanchin-ryu for about a year and had some friends who studied it for several years. I had my green belt and was up for promotion again when I stopped. I attended a seminar that was led by CGM Dearman and had a similar chaotic experience that other s reported on this thread, as far as organization and the technique quality of the individuals present. I left the style because I saw absolutely no self-defense use for the techniques taught in the style and I felt that, with one exception, all the people I interacted with would get seriously hurt if they tried to apply the techniques they were taught. This included the senior brown belts and the two black belts that taught the class. I dont think that the techniques are sound, it isnt good self-defense, and the whole precept is flawed.

One other issue I have is that Sanchin-ryu is in many schools in Michigan. The problem with this is that it often prevents other styles from using school space to teach a more legitimate system of defense. Many schools would not let more than one martial art style be taught on premise.

Lastly I saw on the Sanchin-ryu web site that CGM Dearmans sons had been promoted to 8th degree recently. As a martial artist, I find this appalling. This is the best indication of this styles lack of credibility that could ever be produced.
 

Tez3

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Interesting that it took two years for anyone to defend this style!
 

tenphse

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I agree that two years is a long time to respond to the original posts regarding Sanchin-ryu.

Two questions that I have are:

1. What documentation is there of CGM Dearman's all-comers challenge to defend his art? I remember hearing this story when I was a student, but I have never heard any names or documentation on this.

2. Where is all the online documentation of this style. I am slightly concerned that for a style that is in so many schools and has so many students, there is very little documentation outside of the official site. Not saying that this is too significant, but it is strange to me that people say so little about the style.
 

punisher73

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Tez3,

It didn't take 2 years for anyone to say anything. A new person posted on it after 2 yrs and resurrected the thread.


Tenphse:

What techniques do you find that wouldn't work in a real situation from the basics? What strategies do you find flawed?
 

Tez3

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With all due respect,

No one here truly understands the nature of the Sanchin-Ryu Philosophy here from your comments on names of kata to the very impatient complaining about not studying weapons early on. The negitive energy in your voice is not welcome in the Sanchin world:

The name Sanchin, meaning three battles, is interpreted as the battle to unify the mind, body, and spirit​

Karate for us is more than a form, a kata fist, hand or foot but a away of life. As for you, you clam on encountering shady unclear history nothing has been coverd up as you will find down to the emblem Isshin Ryu is one of the roots of are art although many martial arts are great and have rich history. Many people are drawn into martial arts out of ego and have a very western way of thinking meshing many ideals and techniques insead of dedicating theirselves to one.​

Understand before I stop that Sanchin-Ryu has traditional setting in the respective Okanawan legacy. As for the slander on the permotion of a master no matter who it is or what age the individual is the one who grows time size or strength, age or athletic ability are not factors in defending ones self. Not factors in growing in Sanchin-Ryu as long as your heart beats the battle to unify the mind, body, and spirit in this art form lives on.​

any Q? EMAIL ME stratacon_hq@yahoo.com


This is the post that reanimated the discussion, it is in defence of the style which as I said took two years.
 

TallAdam85

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well if anyone wants my help i currently moved back to Detroit and teaching private lessons and work shops in tang soo do and sport karate
 

tenphse

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punisher73: The flaws I remember are:

The good things I saw taught in class were the idea that get used to the idea that your going to get hit and get over it. Also learning to fight on your back while prone and keep an opponent off of you is a great idea and actually had good application in the way it was taught.

1. Bringing everything to a close distance isn't a bad idea, but the application is wrong. I thought the distance that we were taught to fight at in class would get you pummeled by anyone who has done any boxing or street fighting.

2. Closing the distance was never covered. If someone can fight at a distance (kicks or punches), they can beat you, you can't always wait for them to come in close.

3. I didn't see any strategies to handle how to defend yourself if someone grabs you or takes you down (wrestling).


try more later
 

punisher73

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1. Bringing everything to a close distance isn't a bad idea, but the application is wrong. I thought the distance that we were taught to fight at in class would get you pummeled by anyone who has done any boxing or street fighting.

I guess I would ask you to be more specific on what in the application would get you pummeled since I don't know what you are picturing mentally in the scenario. CGM Dearman used to box when he was younger and understands how a boxer fights and it is taken into consideration with certain strategies. If you give me a bit more specifics I can address how that is handled.



2. Closing the distance was never covered. If someone can fight at a distance (kicks or punches), they can beat you, you can't always wait for them to come in close.

It is covered, just not in the beginning because the emphasis is on in-fighting and most people's natural tendency when untrained in a range is keep them at a distance. To get past this, you learn to fight in close and face the uncomfortableness of being so close. Then when you understand that you learn other strategies for dealing with different types of fighters such as kickers/punchers/wrestlers etc. Also, when I worked in the jail for almost 7 years I NEVER saw a fight that resembled a martial arts tournament or boxing match that people kept their distance to employ their tactics, it was always up close and personal in the range we train for, and this matched CGM Dearman's experience as well to start as the base for the strategies and tactics used.

3. I didn't see any strategies to handle how to defend yourself if someone grabs you or takes you down (wrestling).

I work on that in my classes as it was taught to me by my instructors. I would agree that many instructors are not comfortable on the ground and probably don't address that topic with their class, but that lies with the individual instructor and not something in the style itself.

As I said in a previous post, people study Sanchinryu for many different reasons, be it a personal study of themself, a hobby that they like to do, exercise, or self-defense. Find an instructor that fits what you are looking for, to get what you need from your training. It's a buffet table and you need to select what you want to eat. But, that being said, there are other martial arts that might fit those needs better for some people than others. If it doesn't fit into your personality and something else does than find what works for you. This doesn't mean the style is useless, just that it doesn't fit your needs. For me, it is Sanchinryu and it has always worked for me in my 10 yrs at the department in corrections and on the law enforcement side. I incorporate alot of it into what I teach at the department since I am a defensive tactics instructor for our department and have always gotten positive feedback from the other deputies.

What documentation is there of CGM Dearman's all-comers challenge to defend his art? I remember hearing this story when I was a student, but I have never heard any names or documentation on this.

This was back in the 70's and 80's and it wasn't a "formal" challenge that he put out to people. It was people who just showed up and wanted to fight because they didn't think he should start the style or just wanted to test themselves and try to prove they were the better fighter, and in all of those he always showed that Sanchinryu was a viable system to protect yourself. I think it would be a bit egotistical on his part to write down all of their names and then advertise it. I believe he just looked at it as something that had to be done in the early stages of Sanchinryu to establish credibilty.
 

tenphse

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1. I didn't see anything that addressed defending against medium range (18" to 30") hits to the face and body (either from kicks or punches). I also didn't see any attacks at that range.

2. I am thinking that your situation (inside a jail) which is typically limited in space, is going to lend itself to a close fight. The fights that I have seen went to the ground or grapple most of the time, but I have seen fights that were at medium range with fists.

3. Coming from a TKD background I understand about not having strategies for grappling, but they do have a strategy for fighting outside of that range. The problem I have was that if you are going to fight someone at close range you are going to get grabbed. We had two BB (who each had been trained by different instructors, a 1st and a 2nd) and this was never brought up.

As for people studying martial arts for their own reasons, I can understand this. I understand that some martial arts have devolved into more religious or exercise based systems (ki society aikido and tae bo [sic] for examples). I can understand that some people want to improve their health or want a system of self defense or a hobby. But the system should be based on sound self defense, practicing in a realistic way (sparing and tournaments if an individual desires), and not self-esteem. The problem is when a style caters to people who just show up, promote to satisfy their ego, etc it suffers. If you can't perform all the techniques that a black belt is supposed too, then you are not a black belt. A person shouldn't be promoted because they are doing the best they can. If you went to college and did the best you could but still failed out, you shouldn't get a degree.

I disagree with you about taking names of challengers. If you are going to sell a style on the fact that it is battle tested, it had better be able to provide details about those battles.
 

punisher73

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1. I didn't see anything that addressed defending against medium range (18" to 30") hits to the face and body (either from kicks or punches). I also didn't see any attacks at that range.

If I had to guess, I would say that you didn't dig too deep into basics or CBA's then in your study, or look at sanchin-ichi. Also, for example, if you take the vertical punch to the face how does that differ in distance than a boxer's lead punch? Or the strategies of a ridgehand. Not to be insulting, but being go-kyu (green belt) I don't think you had enough time to dig into what was there.

2. I am thinking that your situation (inside a jail) which is typically limited in space, is going to lend itself to a close fight. The fights that I have seen went to the ground or grapple most of the time, but I have seen fights that were at medium range with fists.

The dayroom they are in and TV room is big and spacious, it is a direct supervision jail which means that 56 inmates are all out at once with one deputy in there. It's not a linear where they are narrow halls/cells. As far as going to the ground or staying in medium range. I have seen that, my comment was about closing the distance and alot of movement outside of the range like in sport competitions where they engage and disengage in their exchanges. When two people really want to go at it they stay in close.

3. Coming from a TKD background I understand about not having strategies for grappling, but they do have a strategy for fighting outside of that range. The problem I have was that if you are going to fight someone at close range you are going to get grabbed. We had two BB (who each had been trained by different instructors, a 1st and a 2nd) and this was never brought up.

There are strategies for grappling, both on the ground and standing. Both offensively and defensively. Did you see any techniques for getting in close and doing a single leg takedown, or other throws and dumps? Because they are there and taught. Did you incorporate your techniques starting from shoulder/wrist/arm grabs and working into a clinch? Because they are there and taught. Did you work on what to do if someone gains mount position? Because they are there and taught. Did you work on rolls, falls, etc. ? Because, yep they are there and taught. Do you start right off with new students, such as orange and green belts. No, you start to see if they have a handle on using the techniques in there basic version first and then expand on that. If you were to talk to my brown belt students they would know about those things, but if you talked to my new students they probably would say that it wasn't there because they haven't spent the time in their study.

I disagree with you about taking names of challengers. If you are going to sell a style on the fact that it is battle tested, it had better be able to provide details about those battles.

Go to the website, do you see that advertised to sell the style? No, that is something I said because I know the background and some of what CGM Dearman went through in Sanchinryu's early years. I also point it out because I have heard that it was never tested and he just put some stuff together and who knows if it would ever work for real.

Just out of curiousity. Can you provide a list of most styles "challenge matches" that the founders had when fighting and creating the style? More times than not, the answer is "no". It wasn't a marketing thing. The Gracies are the only ones I know that documented all of theirs to market themselves (nothing wrong with that approach if that's what you choose to do).

But the system should be based on sound self defense, practicing in a realistic way (sparing and tournaments if an individual desires), and not self-esteem. The problem is when a style caters to people who just show up, promote to satisfy their ego, etc it suffers. If you can't perform all the techniques that a black belt is supposed too, then you are not a black belt. A person shouldn't be promoted because they are doing the best they can. If you went to college and did the best you could but still failed out, you shouldn't get a degree.

Hmmmm, we do spar. Again, it's used sparringly and with a purpose when the student has a better understanding and control of their techniques so as not to encourage bad habits. What techniques in sanchinryu should a blackbelt be able to perform? All a blackbelt in sanchinryu means is that you have an understanding of the basic foundation and you are ready to start learning. Sanchinryu is based on understanding the physical, mental, and emotional parts of ourselves and our promotions reflect that.

How many fist fights do you get into each year? How many fights do you get into (verbal/emotional) with loved ones/friends or coworkers? If you truly want to practice "self-defense" shouldn't you understand how to use strategies to protect you and the other person in those other types of confrontations? How do you use your "wansu" on a mental level to upset their emotional balance to help gain control of the situation so it doesn't escalate? So no, all our class time is not spent on sweating with punches and kicks because that is a narrow focus for what most people deal with each day.
 

Dalum

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First off, I'd have to say that this is an amazing thread since it's trancended beyond 2 years of talk! Second, I'm an ex-student of the art. My instructor was very good at what he did but never stayed in one place when it came to styles. He found that the values and practicality in the style left him a bit "flat" so he went off in a different direction. I stayed in for quite some time (Brown Belt to be specific) and started feeling that I needed soemthing different as well. For my own reasons I left and went to a different style. By nothing but a cooincidence, I walk into the studio that I wanted to know more about and there he was! My old instructor... My new instructor!

All in all, I agree with the others that have bee nlevel headed about this whole thread. 1 style is not the best for everyone. Styles, like many other things, is like trying to order pizza for a group of people. I for one don't like fruit with my meat. ;)
 

tenphse

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You are right I did only have my greenbelt at the time, so I do accept the idea that I didn't see everything. On the other hand, at the time I had studied martial arts for over 5 years, so I think I was an OK judge of what I was learning and the quality of individuals I came into contact. I was associated with the style for about a year and had some associates that had years with the style, and I could judge their ability to engage and survive a conflict. So in my time and my evaluation of what I saw, it was not useful in a physical conflict.

We did work on falls and a few drills on grab scenarios, but I didn't think that the response to the grab scenarios were realistic. Never did see a throw, take down or realistic dump being taught or practiced.

As far as the CGM Dearman's defense of his art and it being advertised, it was one of the first things that was ever told to me when I started class. It was also reiterated on several occasions during my study. When it was brought up as many times as it was to me, including your post which was the first time that I have read anything about the art in 14+ years, that is a selling point. It comes down to when anyone challenges the history of the style, that is the defense, and my question is: are all these challenge matches verifiable.



Many styles out there either come from a culture of war, conflict or competition. Any of these are viable solutions for the testing of a style. Most of the "traditional" styles can trace their founding back to someone or a group that was involved in one of the three. There are several styles taught in Michigan that can trace themselves, publicly, to one of the above.

we do spar. Again, it's used sparringly and with a purpose when the student has a better understanding and control of their techniques so as not to encourage bad habits.
Holding sparring off so they don't develop bad habits is one of the craziest lines I have ever heard of. If someone has been associated with a style for a year and hasn't ever had a chance to see how to apply the techniques for fear of bad habits, that is crazy. From what I witnessed, the brown and low level black belts were still trying to avoid forming bad habits as well then.

You can practice your "wansu" all you want, but when it comes down to it, it wont help you when the fight starts. If you want to learn to avoid a fight, go take a conflict resolution class or read a book, if you want to survive, then go study martial arts. It should be about working from day one to give a student real world strategies and testing that will help them survive. After about a year with the system, outside of the concept of fighting from the prone position, which in my opinion other styles teach better, I didn't find anything useful, and some things that I thought were dangerous.

No one style is right for everyone, no one style has everything for every situation. Not all styles are created or taught equally.
 

punisher73

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Many styles out there either come from a culture of war, conflict or competition. Any of these are viable solutions for the testing of a style. Most of the "traditional" styles can trace their founding back to someone or a group that was involved in one of the three

Really? What challenge matches did the founders of Isshin-ryu, Uechi-ryu, Goju-ryu, Shotokan, American Kenpo, TKD have? They all might have a story or two about a fight, but again most of the time it wasn't formally recorded. It's also not a slam against those styles, it's a reflection that even though they have been used by people they didn't record alot of things.

Holding sparring off so they don't develop bad habits is one of the craziest lines I have ever heard of. If someone has been associated with a style for a year and hasn't ever had a chance to see how to apply the techniques for fear of bad habits, that is crazy

In a year you never engaged in ippon kumite? Never did hand to hand drills? "Free fighting" as you are probably referencing it, is introduced a little at a time. Look at a lot of other styles, they don't always use "free fighting" as a main tool either. You use drills to build up to that to understand in a controlled environment how to apply your tools and then little by little "up the resistance".

Never did see a throw, take down or realistic dump being taught or practiced.
You never worked on or learned throws/takedowns (using judo terminology since you referenced experience in it) like Tai Otoshi, Ippon Seoinage, Koshi Guruma, Morote Seoinage, O Goshi, Tomoe Nage, to name some? Some of those are variations on our Wansu concept.

You can practice your "wansu" all you want, but when it comes down to it, it wont help you when the fight starts. If you want to learn to avoid a fight, go take a conflict resolution class or read a book, if you want to survive, then go study martial arts. It should be about working from day one to give a student real world strategies and testing that will help them survive.

More to life and martial arts than just fighting. We are pretty open about addressing the fact that we want to improve ourselves in our physical, mental and spiritual/emotional (whichever term you prefer) lives. If all you want is the physical then fine, but know that most "RBSD" also teach conflict resolution and precontact awareness as part of their curriculum.

If you want hardcore training in a dojo that's fine. We prefer to leave that up to each individual if that is what they want, and help with those goals. BUT, don't assume that because you have met people that have different goals than you that the style doesn't have merit.

I think an old quote from an Aikido master is very applicable here. I apologize for not remembering the exact person that said it though, and it might be a bit of a paraphrase.

Student: Aikido doesn't work.
Sensei: Your Aikido doesn't work, mine works fine.


....My Sanchinryu works fine and have been using it actively for almost 14 years now.
 

tenphse

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With out research I can't comment on all the styles you listed, but I do know that a number of Ed Parker's students fought in full contact tournaments when it was getting started. I also know that GM Tae Park was a tournament champion before moving to America. Most "traditional styles" come from a combat oriented background, Sanchin-ryu is something that CGM Dearman developed on his own. I think it is reasonable to ask pertinent questions about how this style was tested since it doesn't directly evolve from those historical lines.

The only move that I recall that was close to a take down was something called a "dump", which neither the brown belt nor black belt could execute convincingly.

I am glad that your style works for you. The issue I has is that in my time associated with the style, and with those associated with it, I only met one person who had a chance to survive a fight. He got in trouble on several occasions because his technique wasn't the "sanchin-ryu" way. The rest were deluded into thinking that the colored clothe they tied around their waste meant they knew decent self-defense techniques.

I also don't see the point when a master instructor visits the class and spends the time discussing how the style just "materialized" in CGM Dearman's head. No technique, just talking for an hour.

As far as Aikido goes...it depends on the style. Some of it works, some doesn't. Some of them are dancers who are more interested in developing inner power or "looking flashy" or being a compliant (and telegraphing) partner than good technique, practice and application.
 

Sanchin-J

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It seems to me that a good portion of the people who make critical judgments of Sanchin-Ryu have made early assumptions based upon a single visit or even a lack of understanding of the art in itself. I myself am a long time dabbler in the Martial Arts, having picked up various techniques from "Law Enforcement" and Military training as well as prolonged studies in the Bujinkan system. What I find most disgruntling about the nay-sayers is that they assume because a school has not been around since ancient times, that it cannot be a credible school.

Sanchin-Ryu Karate isn't something you can simply peek into and get a full understanding of, it takes time, patience and participation. Many are critical of the techniques used in the art and criticize the effectiveness of the art in general when in fact, in the wrong hands, it could be just as deadly as any other Martial Art out there. Case in point, look at any professional sport for instance baseball. You go to batting practice, swing the bat hundreds of times, throw the ball hundreds of times, catch the ball hundreds of times, and then you go home and repeat it at the next practice. After awhile you end up establishing a very strong and capable technique. Same could be said for American Kick boxing, or any other number of Martial Arts out there. I also would like to comment about the techniques and katas, many people are saying they are "made up" when in fact they are not. Many of these kata are either taken from Okinawan Karate or utilize the basic movement and defensive techniques of Okinawan Karate. Some of the kata may have been slightly changed in some cases depending on what was considered more efficient or effective.

In any art, you can find deviations in technique, from my experience in Sanchin-Ryu, I've found my instructors to be open minded and to be encouraging regarding it. That is not to say that they want you to do your own thing, obviously you are there to learn Sanchin-Ryu not Bob-Ryu. However, they encourage you to keep an open mind and to use what works when or if the time comes when you need to take action. Sanchin-Ryu is not just about being able to throw a punch or kick, it's about building a strong mind body and spirit. If you want the flashier Martial Art like TKD with their Aerial kicks or Kung Fu with their energy draining movements, then by all means study it, but be forewarned, you'll get the good and the bad in those arts as well.


Wrapping this post up seems like the proper thing to do at this point, but I want to add that you get what you put into the training and into your personal arsenal. Someone mentioned a move they saw called a "dump" which obviously refers to a take down of sorts and how it was improperly executed. I find myself mildly amused simply because of the fact that I've always taken pride on being somewhat of a mixed Martial Artist myself, and yes there are times when a take down is avoided, it happens all the time in the MMA world. That however does not mean a technique was poorly executed, it could have simply been that the opponent saw what was coming and was able to counter it. Like I said originally, you get what you put into the training. The fact that Sanchin-Ryu is a community based school, means that the training Sanchin Systems offers has to be flexible and well monitored which often times can mean having to modify technique so that the student doesn't get harmed or harm others in the process of establishing a firm foundation.
 

Sanchin-J

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Oh, and I do apologize for resurrecting this post yet again, but when I found it on the net while searching for Sanchin-Ryu content, I couldn't help but register and defend the art.
 

Brian R. VanCise

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Welcome Sanchin-J please introduce yourself in the meet and greet and I look forward to hearing more about your martial studies in future threads.
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