Common expressions that are wrong....

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
28,709
Reaction score
9,643
Location
Hendersonville, NC
I imagine the 2 hour training session, once or maybe twice a week was devised to fit in with student’s work/life and the teacher’s convenience.
I suspect mostly the former, as many instructors devote most or all of their evenings to classes, anyway. And it's MUCH easier to budget your time around getting to classes 2-3 times a week for a couple of hours, rather than managing to stop there every day on the way home from work for 15-30 minutes. And if you add in the need to travel, warm up, and change clothes, it doesn't add up to the same time commitment.
 

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
28,709
Reaction score
9,643
Location
Hendersonville, NC
This is an oft-used graphical representation of how learning/revision works for cognitive tasks. It’s only an assumption it’s similar for motor tasks.
View attachment 29338
More than an assumption - it's anecdotally observable, at least in principle (not the numbers - I rather doubt they're that consistent with information, either).
 

Gyakuto

Master Black Belt
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
1,073
Reaction score
854
Location
UK
Which is part of the reason it's so maddening when students obviously don't do anything to practice outside of class.
Yes, we used to get this quite a bit in my previous dojo and after a while the seniors would tell the students that any evidence of practise outside the dojo would lead to deeper instruction being delivered inside the dojo.

After telling a certain person to straighten up their back foot for the umpteenth time, they admitted they were only there while they saved up for white hakama, keikogi and sword so they could emulate an anime/manga character at Cosplay events 🙄
 

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
28,709
Reaction score
9,643
Location
Hendersonville, NC
Yes, we used to get this quite a bit in my previous dojo and after a while the seniors would tell the students that any evidence of practise outside the dojo would lead to deeper instruction being delivered inside the dojo.

After telling a certain person to straighten up their back foot for the umpteenth time, they admitted they were only there while they saved up for white hakama, keikogi and sword so they could emulate an anime/manga character at Cosplay events 🙄
They could have saved the money they wasted on lessons they didn't want, and used that toward the cosplay garb.
 

Gyakuto

Master Black Belt
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
1,073
Reaction score
854
Location
UK
They could have saved the money they wasted on lessons they didn't want, and used that toward the cosplay garb.
I think she wanted to be able to look a little convincing when wielding and resheathing her sword (to muggles, anyway). Plus the laws on owning a sword in the U.K. have been tightened-up somewhat and you have to have proof of membership of a national organisation, insurance and a letter from your teacher indicating your attendance at training! That’s just for a blunt sword! Apparently you have to give up ownership of the sword to the ‘old bill’ if you stop practising.
 

GojuTommy

Brown Belt
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
418
Reaction score
149
“Well my style only needs to work on untrained people” and any variation of that.

Speaking from the American perspective here.
Traditionally the school bullies for boys are the ‘jocks’ so if you’re going to protect yourself from a wrestler, your style better work on trained opponents. Football isn’t a martial art, but all players even on offense practice tackling, your style better have some level of take down defense if you want to have a hope in hell of avoiding a tackle from a football player. Some schools still have boxing teams

That’s just speaking from the public school system perspective. From a more general perspective martial arts is constantly growing and the idea that criminals who think they’re tough aren’t training to prove how tough they are, or to make themselves tougher is hilarious.
For women domestic violence is a bigger issue than for men, but we fairly often hear about fighters who beat their wives.

It would be interesting if a jail or a prison allowed a study to be done particularly upon intake of new prisoners with a questionnaire with one or more questions asking if they have train in martial arts or combat sports at all.
 

geezer

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Oct 20, 2007
Messages
7,186
Reaction score
3,295
Location
Phoenix, AZ
“Well my style only needs to work on untrained people” and any variation of that.

Speaking from the American perspective here.
Traditionally the school bullies for boys are the ‘jocks’ so if you’re going to protect yourself from a wrestler, your style better work on trained opponents. Football isn’t a martial art, but all players even on offense practice tackling, your style better have some level of take down defense if you want to have a hope in hell of avoiding a tackle from a football player. Some schools still have boxing teams
I'm a high school teacher here in the states and I don't know of any public high school that allows boxing ...either as a team sport or extracurricular club. I did a quick google search and found a reference to just one school boxing program in the Chicago area ...but that's a rare exception.

If I were advising a teen on what to practice to physically defend himself, I'd recommend going out for wrestling, and take MMA, Jits, or boxing at a private club ...and avoid ever getting in a fight on school grounds. Doesn't seem to matter if you are the attacker or defender ...you will get suspended.

Of course if it happens off-campus weapons and multiple attackers are a greater possibility.

Maybe we should just bring back HS school boxing or maybe MMA? Sounds less dangerous to me.
 

GojuTommy

Brown Belt
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
418
Reaction score
149
I'm a high school teacher here in the states and I don't know of any public high school that allows boxing ...either as a team sport or extracurricular club. I did a quick google search and found a reference to just one school boxing program in the Chicago area ...but that's a rare exception.

If I were advising a teen on what to practice to physically defend himself, I'd recommend going out for wrestling, and take MMA, Jits, or boxing at a private club ...and avoid ever getting in a fight on school grounds. Doesn't seem to matter if you are the attacker or defender ...you will get suspended.

Of course if it happens off-campus weapons and multiple attackers are a greater possibility.

Maybe we should just bring back HS school boxing or maybe MMA? Sounds less dangerous to me.
Did you try googling high school boxing teams? Here’s one example



Not public but not sure it matters lol

So yes a few seconds on google and you can find a handful of examples.
 
Last edited:

drop bear

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
22,355
Reaction score
7,106
“Well my style only needs to work on untrained people” and any variation of that.

Speaking from the American perspective here.
Traditionally the school bullies for boys are the ‘jocks’ so if you’re going to protect yourself from a wrestler, your style better work on trained opponents. Football isn’t a martial art, but all players even on offense practice tackling, your style better have some level of take down defense if you want to have a hope in hell of avoiding a tackle from a football player. Some schools still have boxing teams

That’s just speaking from the public school system perspective. From a more general perspective martial arts is constantly growing and the idea that criminals who think they’re tough aren’t training to prove how tough they are, or to make themselves tougher is hilarious.
For women domestic violence is a bigger issue than for men, but we fairly often hear about fighters who beat their wives.

It would be interesting if a jail or a prison allowed a study to be done particularly upon intake of new prisoners with a questionnaire with one or more questions asking if they have train in martial arts or combat sports at all.

A lot of our Mafia went through a tkd stage there at one point.
 

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
28,709
Reaction score
9,643
Location
Hendersonville, NC
“Well my style only needs to work on untrained people” and any variation of that.

Speaking from the American perspective here.
Traditionally the school bullies for boys are the ‘jocks’ so if you’re going to protect yourself from a wrestler, your style better work on trained opponents. Football isn’t a martial art, but all players even on offense practice tackling, your style better have some level of take down defense if you want to have a hope in hell of avoiding a tackle from a football player. Some schools still have boxing teams

That’s just speaking from the public school system perspective. From a more general perspective martial arts is constantly growing and the idea that criminals who think they’re tough aren’t training to prove how tough they are, or to make themselves tougher is hilarious.
For women domestic violence is a bigger issue than for men, but we fairly often hear about fighters who beat their wives.

It would be interesting if a jail or a prison allowed a study to be done particularly upon intake of new prisoners with a questionnaire with one or more questions asking if they have train in martial arts or combat sports at all.
In none of the fights I got in back in school, did anyone do anything remotely reasonable with any of the skills they may have had. Athletes just got mad and attacked, much like everyone else, but with more strength and agility. I doubt any of them were wrestlers, though - I'd expect that kind of experience to show up.
 

Gyakuto

Master Black Belt
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
1,073
Reaction score
854
Location
UK
If I were advising a teen on what to practice to physically defend himself, I'd recommend going out for wrestling, and take MMA, Jits, or boxing at a private club ...
From the many school fights I witnessed, it seemed the striking arts (boxing) seemed to quell the incident more quickly than grappling. It seems a hardship punch to the face is unsettling, frightening and if sufficient, rattles the brain enough to put off further aggression.

The best tactic I ever saw was one boy, whipping down the trousers and underwear of his adversary, in blindingly fast motion, pushing him over, as his ankles were bound and running away 😂 They don’t teach you that in Krav Maga!
 

tkdroamer

Purple Belt
Joined
Sep 24, 2022
Messages
341
Reaction score
161
I'm a high school teacher here in the states and I don't know of any public high school that allows boxing ...either as a team sport or extracurricular club. I did a quick google search and found a reference to just one school boxing program in the Chicago area ...but that's a rare exception.

If I were advising a teen on what to practice to physically defend himself, I'd recommend going out for wrestling, and take MMA, Jits, or boxing at a private club ...and avoid ever getting in a fight on school grounds. Doesn't seem to matter if you are the attacker or defender ...you will get suspended.

Of course if it happens off-campus weapons and multiple attackers are a greater possibility.

Maybe we should just bring back HS school boxing or maybe MMA? Sounds less dangerous to me.
I am at the age that it feels like I grew up in a different era. I went to grade school in groups of three, changing physical locations every three years. When I was in the 4th/5th/6th grade, our P.E. teacher regularly had the boys 'fight' when it was warm or dry enough for us to go outside. There was zero input from the teacher and little to nothing was learned as far as technique or strategy. But I fully believe it was very good for all the boys. There was no animosity, and it was 'light' and fun. Lots of rolling and wrestling. Yes, we could punch to the face and kick. But once you were popped in the face a few times, you thought twice about doing it. There were zero issues with fighting in the school.
Fast forward to high school, we had very few issues until race hate reared its ugly head. Then it got really, really bad. The day of our graduation practice a riot was expected and there was LEO from five counties there. The full- blown riot never broke out but there were two big group fights. Several kids went to jail, and some did not graduate. Just utterly stupid stuff looking back.
 

Gyakuto

Master Black Belt
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
1,073
Reaction score
854
Location
UK
I am at the age that it feels like I grew up in a different era. I went to grade school in groups of three, changing physical locations every three years. When I was in the 4th/5th/6th grade, our P.E. teacher regularly had the boys 'fight' when it was warm or dry enough for us to go outside. There was zero input from the teacher and little to nothing was learned as far as technique or strategy. But I fully believe it was very good for all the boys. There was no animosity, and it was 'light' and fun. Lots of rolling and wrestling. Yes, we could punch to the face and kick. But once you were popped in the face a few times, you thought twice about doing it. There were zero issues with fighting in the school.
As long as the teachers didn’t throw ‘jello’ on you while you were fighting and take photos, that’s fine!😉
 

Gyakuto

Master Black Belt
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
1,073
Reaction score
854
Location
UK
Fast forward to high school, we had very few issues until race hate reared its ugly head. Then it got really, really bad. The day of our graduation practice a riot was expected and there was LEO from five counties there. The full- blown riot never broke out but there were two big group fights. Several kids went to jail, and some did not graduate. Just utterly stupid stuff looking back.
The world often looks at how US High Schools are depicted in films and TV and we laugh and think they‘re exaggerated-for-dramatic effect rendering of the schools. Now I’m wondering if that’s the case…😳
 

GojuTommy

Brown Belt
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
418
Reaction score
149
From the many school fights I witnessed, it seemed the striking arts (boxing) seemed to quell the incident more quickly than grappling. It seems a hardship punch to the face is unsettling, frightening and if sufficient, rattles the brain enough to put off further aggression.

The best tactic I ever saw was one boy, whipping down the trousers and underwear of his adversary, in blindingly fast motion, pushing him over, as his ankles were bound and running away 😂 They don’t teach you that in Krav Maga!
This reminds me of the ‘naked’ wrestler prank on YouTube but in reverse.
 

GojuTommy

Brown Belt
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
418
Reaction score
149
The world often looks at how US High Schools are depicted in films and TV and we laugh and think they‘re exaggerated-for-dramatic effect rendering of the schools. Now I’m wondering if that’s the case…😳
I’d say most Hollywood depictions are exaggerated, but if you tone it down like 20-25% that wouldn’t be too far off for some people.

The most accurate depiction to my experience how ever was boy meets world.
 

geezer

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Oct 20, 2007
Messages
7,186
Reaction score
3,295
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Not public but not sure it matters lol
...So yes a few seconds on google and you can find a handful of examples.

Every example you posted was a private school ... either secular or religious, as in the case of the first one which is Catholic. And I think it does matter. I attended private schools myself and they offered all manner of programs and extra curricular-activities that most public schools can't. Martial arts and boxing, for example. :)
 

Wing Woo Gar

Senior Master
Joined
Sep 30, 2021
Messages
2,706
Reaction score
1,365
Location
Northern California
I’d say most Hollywood depictions are exaggerated, but if you tone it down like 20-25% that wouldn’t be too far off for some people.

The most accurate depiction to my experience how ever was boy meets world.
I went to Long Beach Polytechnic High School. Graduated in 1989. We had metal detectors because so many firearms and weapons came in. Many students were gang members and people were regularly shot/stabbed/beaten in those days. I havent seen a movie that properly depicts my high school experience. My school wasn’t even the most dangerous in the area. Anyone here grow up in L.A. in the 80s? I lived in the Rolling 20s Crip/ICG neighborhood. Less than 3 years after graduation, I lived through the 1992 LA riots. We traded our guitars for shotguns at the pawn shop during it. Ah good times…
 

Latest Discussions

Top