Common expressions that are wrong....

Wing Woo Gar

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It's submachine gun, and he's not serious. Ownership is tightly regulated, and extremely expensive. Civilians own them because they're fun to shoot. Or because they're collectors. But outside of Hollywood, you're just not going to find them being used by criminals.
Not true. I was serious. Ingrams Mac 11 to be specific. As Im sure you know, any semi auto that will fire from an open bolt can be easily converted to fire doubles. An auto sear is not difficult to manufacture for people with some military knowledge of firearms. Full auto Glock switches are commonplace in the city these days. They are usually chinese in origin and bought on the web.
 

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Not true. I was serious. Ingrams Mac 11 to be specific. As Im sure you know, any semi auto that will fire from an open bolt can be easily converted to fire doubles. An auto sear is not difficult to manufacture for people with some military knowledge of firearms. Full auto Glock switches are commonplace in the city these days. They are usually chinese in origin and bought on the web.
Not difficult for people with military knowledge of firearms.
I was a navy gunners mate, and was in charge of my ships armor, which included maintaining all the small arms as well as my 25mm guns, and I can tell you most people with military knowledge of firearms have no clue how to convert a semi-sear into an auto-sear, me being one of them.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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Not difficult for people with military knowledge of firearms.
I was a navy gunners mate, and was in charge of my ships armor, which included maintaining all the small arms as well as my 25mm guns, and I can tell you most people with military knowledge of firearms have no clue how to convert a semi-sear into an auto-sear, me being one of them.
Fair enough. You are an actual expert, I am not. What I should have said was armorers. That would have been somewhat more accurate. I would assume you had an armorer somewhere that would know how the guns he repaired actually worked. It isnt very complicated, even for a gunners mate. My point is that it isnt that difficult for criminally minded people to figure it out. Some moron even printed out the parts on metal cards and was prosecuted for selling them through his YouTube videos.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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Not difficult for people with military knowledge of firearms.
I was a navy gunners mate, and was in charge of my ships armor, which included maintaining all the small arms as well as my 25mm guns, and I can tell you most people with military knowledge of firearms have no clue how to convert a semi-sear into an auto-sear, me being one of them.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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Not difficult for people with military knowledge of firearms.
I was a navy gunners mate, and was in charge of my ships armor, which included maintaining all the small arms as well as my 25mm guns, and I can tell you most people with military knowledge of firearms have no clue how to convert a semi-sear into an auto-sear, me being one of them.
Sorry, I just reread my last post and it has an ******* tone that wasnt actually intended.
 

Gyakuto

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No. Machine guns, or fully automatic weapons, are rather strictly regulated by federal laws dating back to 1934 which are enforced by the ATF. I don't pretend to know much about it, but if you care you can google it.
Ah字ight.

It's not surprising to me that certain weapons are restricted. I mean would you want your crazy neighbor to have a rocket launcher?
Theyre elderly and have the best parties! Id be happy for them to have a rocket launcher!

What strikes me as most inconsistent about weapons laws is how easily some very lethal modern weapons that didn't exist when the US Constitution was first adopted are protected, while weapons in universal use in those times like large knives and swords are often prohibited.
I can here lawyers rubbing their hands together all the way from here!
However I live in the "Wild West". Pretty much everything is legal here with no permit necessary: Rifles, handguns, swords, knives, batons ...even the that terrible weapon of mass-destruction, the nunchaku!
So would you be allowed to walk down in a shopping mall wearing a sword? Nunchakus佞中
 

Gyakuto

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You can buy them in wal mart. What you can buy, depends on state. Each state has widely differing laws regarding individual firearm features, magazine capacity, type of ammunition available, background checks, waiting periods, etc. Some states are wide open like Tennesse, Texas, Alaska. Some states are nearly draconian in comparison.
I didnt realise that each state has it s own, differing laws! Just like Europe!
 

Gyakuto

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We can buy guns and ammo in Walmart, but no part of the bill of rights is beyond limits.

Civilians generally cannot own artillery (sub)machine guns, any firearm intended to be fired with 2 hands with a barrel less than 16 in length (the wording on all this can be very complicated legalese), suppressors, or explosives. Incendiaries are state by state.
Good heavens!

To get any of those weapons you need a special tax stamp, and theyre almost all extremely expensive generally. A legitimate machine gun or sub machine gun will cost about as much as a new car, or a even a small house.
So if youre wealthy, you can own a machine gun (in some states)? Astonishing! Surely the poor should be able to strafe their neighbourhoods with bullets just like those in佞...Malibu (thats where Charlie Harper lives, isnt it?).
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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I didnt realise that each state has it s own, differing laws! Just like Europe!
The US makes a lot more sense if you consider it to be the EU with states instead of countries, and everyone speaks (mostly) the same language.

Not a 1:1 comparison, but clears up a lot of the misunderstandings that happen overseas.
 

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Civilians generally cannot own artillery (sub)machine guns, any firearm intended to be fired with 2 hands with a barrel less than 16 in length (the wording on all this can be very complicated legalese), suppressors, or explosives. Incendiaries are state by state.
Not true. Owning a item covered by the National Firearms Act (NFA) is not all that difficult for law abiding citizens.

The NFA regulates ownership of shotguns with an overall length of less than 26" or a barrel less than 18", a rifle with an overall length less than 26" or a barrel less than 16", weapons capable of automatic fire, suppressors, and explosive devices.

The process is simple and straight forward. It's time consuming, because it involves multiple government agencies. I've made a detailed post about the process elsewhere. The short version is that you buy the item and it sits at the FFL dealer while you do paperwork. You get a signature from your local sheriff or judge, send that with more papers to the ATF (along with $200), they forward part of it to the FBI for the background check, and when it's all done they send it back with the tax stamp.

To get any of those weapons you need a special tax stamp, and theyre almost all extremely expensive generally.
Not true at all. The tax stamp costs $200, which is not prohibitive at all for the vast majority of people. Especially when you consider the other costs. My bedside gun is a Glock 41 with TrueGlow sights, TLR-4, Pyramid trigger, Lone Wolf extended/threaded barrel, and a SilencerCo Osprey 45. So I've got about $2000 invested in the hardware. That $200 is no big deal
A legitimate machine gun or sub machine gun will cost about as much as a new car, or a even a small house.
Also not really correct.

Automatic weapons are divided into two categories. Pre- and Post-1986 manufacture.

The road to owning a Pre-1986 weapon is the same as any other NFA device. Buy it. Add one more form for a "Curios & Relics" collector license. Get the tax stamp. Take it home.
These weapons are scarce, and collectible. That drives up the price. A full-auto pre-1986 AR-15 might well cost you $30,000. That won't really buy you much car, and certainly not much of a house.

Or you can spend $150 for a three year Class I FFL. Pay an additional $500-$1000 per year to upgrade that to the Class III FFL SOT. Now you can buy a brand new full-auto AR-15 for $1500.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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I didnt realise that each state has it s own, differing laws! Just like Europe!
Its not great for consistency. The difficult part is keeping up with the changes. Laws can change quickly and one must stay abreast of these changes in order to remain compliant. I for one am meticulous about following the laws and staying informed of ongoing civil litigation of these.
 

Dirty Dog

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So if youre wealthy, you can own a machine gun (in some states)? Astonishing! Surely the poor should be able to strafe their neighbourhoods with bullets just like those in佞...Malibu (thats where Charlie Harper lives, isnt it?).
The information you're replying to is inaccurate. You do not need to be particularly wealthy. I certainly am not.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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Good heavens!


So if youre wealthy, you can own a machine gun (in some states)? Astonishing! Surely the poor should be able to strafe their neighbourhoods with bullets just like those in佞...Malibu (thats where Charlie Harper lives, isnt it?).
You hit on something in your first statement that I believe gets to the heart of gun rights/laws in this country. I dont want to get into political discussion here.
 

Dirty Dog

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Its not great for consistency. The difficult part is keeping up with the changes. Laws can change quickly and one must stay abreast of these changes in order to remain compliant. I for one am meticulous about following the laws and staying informed of ongoing civil litigation of these.
It's not really difficult to keep up. The author of THIS booklet is an attorney specializing in gun laws. It's updated every year. We keep a copy with us when we travel and check each state before we cross the border.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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Not true. Owning a item covered by the National Firearms Act (NFA) is not all that difficult for law abiding citizens.

The NFA regulates ownership of shotguns with an overall length of less than 26" or a barrel less than 18", a rifle with an overall length less than 26" or a barrel less than 16", weapons capable of automatic fire, suppressors, and explosive devices.

The process is simple and straight forward. It's time consuming, because it involves multiple government agencies. I've made a detailed post about the process elsewhere. The short version is that you buy the item and it sits at the FFL dealer while you do paperwork. You get a signature from your local sheriff or judge, send that with more papers to the ATF (along with $200), they forward part of it to the FBI for the background check, and when it's all done they send it back with the tax stamp.


Not true at all. The tax stamp costs $200, which is not prohibitive at all for the vast majority of people. Especially when you consider the other costs. My bedside gun is a Glock 41 with TrueGlow sights, TLR-4, Pyramid trigger, Lone Wolf extended/threaded barrel, and a SilencerCo Osprey 45. So I've got about $2000 invested in the hardware. That $200 is no big deal

Also not really correct.

Automatic weapons are divided into two categories. Pre- and Post-1986 manufacture.

The road to owning a Pre-1986 weapon is the same as any other NFA device. Buy it. Add one more form for a "Curios & Relics" collector license. Get the tax stamp. Take it home.
These weapons are scarce, and collectible. That drives up the price. A full-auto pre-1986 AR-15 might well cost you $30,000. That won't really buy you much car, and certainly not much of a house.

Or you can spend $150 for a three year Class I FFL. Pay an additional $500-$1000 per year to upgrade that to the Class III FFL SOT. Now you can buy a brand new full-auto AR-15 for $1500.
Aha! The bottom is the one I forgot to mention. Another point is none of the nfa stuff matters in california because state law prohibits all nfa items for non LEO unless there is a gun trust. It is quite complicated here.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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It's not really difficult to keep up. The author of THIS booklet is an attorney specializing in gun laws. It's updated every year. We keep a copy with us when we travel and check each state before we cross the border.
Im curious about how you handle traveling to California? You must have to leave the bedside hardware at home? Magazine capacity, threaded barrel, and suppressor are all prohibited here. Do you just swap out?
 

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Aha! The bottom is the one I forgot to mention. Another point is none of the nfa stuff matters in california because state law prohibits all nfa items for non LEO unless there is a gun trust. It is quite complicated here.
You can pay to have someone set up a gun trust for less than $100. Or you can wade through the paperwork yourself for free. It's not really that difficult. Complications removed.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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You can pay to have someone set up a gun trust for less than $100. Or you can wade through the paperwork yourself for free. It's not really that difficult. Complications removed.
Honestly, the only nfa item I would be interested in owning is a suppressor. As you stated earlier, machine guns are fun to shoot, they are also expensive to feed, especially for someone like me.
 

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Im curious about how you handle traveling to California? You must have to leave the bedside hardware at home? Magazine capacity, threaded barrel, and suppressor are all prohibited here. Do you just swap out?
There's that whole gun trust exemption...
But I could swap out parts or swap guns and leave the G41 locked up in the Assassin Kit.
Where we are going plays into decisions about which guns to take.
And since California doesn't recognize any other states CHP, whatever I'm carrying would be left in the car or where we're staying.
 

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