Common expressions that are wrong....

Monkey Turned Wolf

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
11,166
Reaction score
5,107
Location
New York
Btw I know I’m not funny, but I keep trying. That has also been discussed on MT. Perhaps I shall start a thread…
There's a whole joke thread you can practice in. Multiple actually, if you want to rev old threads.

Practice, practice, practice...
 

Steve

Mostly Harmless
Joined
Jul 9, 2008
Messages
21,239
Reaction score
6,756
Location
Covington, WA
I think your mistake is that you think you know me, despite my obvious lack of ability to articulate clearly.
I actually find you quite confusing most of the time, to be honest. I just go with the flow. I used the word "may" on purpose, because no one but you can really know for sure. I just react to your words.
 

Kung Fu Wang

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Sep 26, 2012
Messages
12,684
Reaction score
3,853
Location
Austin, Tx/Shell Beach, Ca
Practice makes perfect.

If you’re doing things wrong, it doesn’t matter how much you practice, it’ll never be right.
Agree! If you train "muscle group isolation" for your entire life, you will never be able to understand the meaning of "body unification".

The human body is like 3 separate springs. Without training, each sping will compress and release by itself. With "body unification" training, all 3 springs can be compressed at the same time, and also release at the same time.
 

Wing Woo Gar

Senior Master
Joined
Sep 30, 2021
Messages
2,711
Reaction score
1,367
Location
Northern California
I actually find you quite confusing most of the time, to be honest. I just go with the flow. I used the word "may" on purpose, because no one but you can really know for sure. I just react to your words.
Agree! If you train "muscle group isolation" for your entire life, you will never be able to understand the meaning of "body unification".

The human body is like 3 separate springs. Without training, each sping will compress and release by itself. With "body unification" training, all 3 springs can be compressed at the same time, and also release at the same time.
Well said.
 

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
28,849
Reaction score
9,731
Location
Hendersonville, NC
Thanks for reminding me of another

Practice makes perfect.

If you’re doing things wrong, it doesn’t matter how much you practice, it’ll never be right.
The head of the association I used to belong to often said, “Practice doesn’t make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect, and there’s no such thing.” The implication was good practice makes better.
 

tkdroamer

Purple Belt
Joined
Sep 24, 2022
Messages
341
Reaction score
161
The head of the association I used to belong to often said, “Practice doesn’t make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect, and there’s no such thing.” The implication was good practice makes better.
I have used that inference for years. If you go all the way down the rabbit trail then no, there is no such thing as perfect practice. But we do and create the best we can. That is close enough for me. Otherwise, we could drive ourselves crazy obsessing over 'perfect'.
Pursue perfection, absolutely. But it can be a burden if not careful.
 

Steve

Mostly Harmless
Joined
Jul 9, 2008
Messages
21,239
Reaction score
6,756
Location
Covington, WA
I have used that inference for years. If you go all the way down the rabbit trail then no, there is no such thing as perfect practice. But we do and create the best we can. That is close enough for me. Otherwise, we could drive ourselves crazy obsessing over 'perfect'.
Pursue perfection, absolutely. But it can be a burden if not careful.
There’s another common saying, don’t let perfect be the enemy of good. And I tend to subscribe to that. I’ve been in the training business for a very long time. I have found that practice and training in general should be the bare minimum required to enable application. It doesn’t have to be fancy and it doesn’t have to be perfect, because application is messy and imperfect, which is where most of the learning actually happens.
 

Gyakuto

Master Black Belt
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
1,200
Reaction score
934
Location
UK
When training, a high ‘repetition-count’ is better than training ‘intelligently’.
 

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
28,849
Reaction score
9,731
Location
Hendersonville, NC
When training, a high ‘repetition-count’ is better than training ‘intelligently’.
A while back, I did some research on that. There are studies that show high-repetition practice isn’t optimal. Rather, low or moderate reps, separated by breaks. I’ll see if I can dig up the most direct study. (NOTE: The study shows quite low repetitions as optimal, but IIRC was for a fairly simple task, compared to some MA tasks.)
 

Gyakuto

Master Black Belt
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
1,200
Reaction score
934
Location
UK
A while back, I did some research on that. There are studies that show high-repetition practice isn’t optimal. Rather, low or moderate reps, separated by breaks. I’ll see if I can dig up the most direct study. (NOTE: The study shows quite low repetitions as optimal, but IIRC was for a fairly simple task, compared to some MA tasks.)
I’m lucky to have a teacher who is intelligent and put’s that to use in his analysis of our art. He’ll say things like ”rise with the feeling of pushing through the balls of the feet rather that using the ‘sky crane’ apparently attached to your shoulders to pull you up! This relaxes the shoulders, makes your movement appear effortless and allows your cuts to be properly aligned because your shoulders are ‘aligned’.” He’s thought it through, experimented with it, refined it and then shares it with us. When he was awarded 6th Dan, many years ago, he spent the following two years training at only half speed so he could spot and iron out any wrinkles etc. That takes considerable discipline. He’s articulate as is his teaching. But only a few of us really appreciate this style of teaching and many don’t and want to do reps and ‘sweat it through’ instead!🤷🏽‍♂️
 

Steve

Mostly Harmless
Joined
Jul 9, 2008
Messages
21,239
Reaction score
6,756
Location
Covington, WA
A while back, I did some research on that. There are studies that show high-repetition practice isn’t optimal. Rather, low or moderate reps, separated by breaks. I’ll see if I can dig up the most direct study. (NOTE: The study shows quite low repetitions as optimal, but IIRC was for a fairly simple task, compared to some MA tasks.)
I’m interested to see what you come up with. Looking forward to it.
 

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
28,849
Reaction score
9,731
Location
Hendersonville, NC
I’m interested to see what you come up with. Looking forward to it.
I'll go looking for that primary study.

On a related note, there are some studies that suggest dividing repetitions over a variety of variables (different bat weights for baseball was an example), rather than doing the same exact thing every time. A good argument for giving scenarios and varied drills priority over repeating kata when looking at skill development (of course other objectives can change that prioritization).
 

GojuTommy

Black Belt
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
509
Reaction score
189
A while back, I did some research on that. There are studies that show high-repetition practice isn’t optimal. Rather, low or moderate reps, separated by breaks. I’ll see if I can dig up the most direct study. (NOTE: The study shows quite low repetitions as optimal, but IIRC was for a fairly simple task, compared to some MA tasks.)
Have a magazine somewhere that talks about this.
They say 15minutes of fry fire 4 times a day is better than an hour at the range once a week.
 

tkdroamer

Purple Belt
Joined
Sep 24, 2022
Messages
341
Reaction score
161
There’s another common saying, don’t let perfect be the enemy of good. And I tend to subscribe to that. I’ve been in the training business for a very long time. I have found that practice and training in general should be the bare minimum required to enable application. It doesn’t have to be fancy and it doesn’t have to be perfect, because application is messy and imperfect, which is where most of the learning actually happens.
To put it is a competition sense, you train, and compete, just enough to be better than your competitor. No need to burn out or smoke a competitor. You may have several more matches that day.
 

tkdroamer

Purple Belt
Joined
Sep 24, 2022
Messages
341
Reaction score
161
Have a magazine somewhere that talks about this.
They say 15minutes of fry fire 4 times a day is better than an hour at the range once a week.
It depends on the intensity and environment, but I agree.
 
Top