Comination order in SKK

shihansmurf

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Hi,

I recently was gifted with Vilari's DVD series. It was interesting o gain more exposure to East Coast Kempo for lack of a better way to describe it. As I have nearly zero experience with Shao Lin Kempo aside from a short workout with a USSD guy in Colorado several years ago wherein I picked up Combo 3, I was oddly perplexed by the order that the Combos are taught in.

So, if anyone could shed some light on how the combos developed and why they are tought in the sequence they are I would really love to find out more about the subject.

Also I understand that Vilari had some Kajukenbo training. Do any of the combos come from Kaju? I don't have any real working knowledge of kaju aside from what I have seen on YouTube. My interest is academic, as I don't intend on branching out into SKK, but I am interested in the development of this branch of Kenpo/Kempo.

Thanks all, in advance

Mark
 
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Yondanchris

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In all of years I have been in SKK the question of technique ordering has always loomed. I have never heard a good explanation for the numerical system used.
Villari probably had Kaju influences but probably never "ranked" in any. I come from USSD background (no longer affiliated for 10 or more years)
so the veil is extremely thick on this side.
FYI although true that SKK is an East Coast art there are a lot of studios and organizations teaching SKK here on the west coast.
 

punisher73

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John Leoning was an early Kajukenbo student and came to California as one of the first on the mainland to teach Kajukenbo. Sonny Gascon learned some from him and eventually created his own style called "Karazenpo Goshin-jutsu". This was where the original combinations came from. Later on down the road, George Pesare learned and in turn taught Nick Cerio who in turn taught Fred Villari. Each person added material to the system in addition to what was taught by Sonny Gascon.

So, if you go back far enough you have some Kajukenbo in the roots via John Leoning. But, I believe that there are enough other influences added that you would be very hard pressed to say that Villari's SKK is a Kajukenbo offshoot. You can see some influences in the combos though. For example, SKK #6 was influenced by Kajukenbo's punch counter 1. You step with the left and do a left inward parry as you do a front kick (later versions in SKK only have the step back and kick). In Kajukenbo, as you do the left inward parry, you also hammer the bicep for a limb destruction with the right hand as you do your kick.

My personal opinion, Kajukenbo stayed with it's hardcore techniques and mentality whereas lineages down the line in the Villari method simplified things to make it more marketable to the mass public (not saying it's bad, just different focus).

In regard to the order, I have heard that they were originally taught in order but that as time went on and to make it easier they were taught out of order based on their percieved simplicity. So, you now learn combo/dm 6&7 first.

Mr. Bishop is a member of this site and probably the best historian on Kajukenbo history. If I got something wrong on that part, he could probably correct it, but I think I got the basics of it.
 
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shihansmurf

shihansmurf

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Thanks Gentlemen. I am appreciative of the information and grateful for you taking the time to fill me in.Mark
 

Matt

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There are plenty of theories, and plenty of 'orders'. Many folks have adjusted them. The perceived simplicity is one key, but also, instructors re-ordered them to differentiate from their past. I've collected a bit of Shaolin Kempo history on my site, kempoinfo.com
 

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