Class or Practice?

stone_dragone

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How many people regularly attend a karate/TKD/escrima/other practice?

How many attend a karate/TKD/escrima/other class?

I was just thinking about the difference between classes and practice. To me the term "practice" indicates a sport or more physical training, whereas the term "class" shows a more academic feeling...

Your thoughts?
 

terryl965

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I hold practices they sweat and sometimes bleed so it would not be consider classes. Just my opinion.
 

MBuzzy

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That is a great point, although I think that they are connected as well. One session can be a mix of both. I think of practice as the rehearsing or repeating of certain movements to improve execution and gain muscle memory. Class though is when you are learning a new movement or technique - not necessarily in a classroom.

I'm also a musician, so I draw a similar dichotomy between rehearsing and practicing. Practicing should be done at home, so that the things that have been learned can be put together and refined during rehearsal.

I feel that the same goes for martial arts. People should be practicing at home to gain proficiency in new material, so that it can be refined, corrected, and added to during class. Unfortunately, that doesn't happen very often, so martial arts classes end up being more of a practice for most people who are trying to just get better at things that they have learned in the past.

Now - the optimal martials arts class is probably a blending of these, because it is best to practice things under a trained eye.
 

lady fighter

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Though I try to explain to students that they should "practice" at home and "learn" in the Dojang.. Our sessions usually consit of both Practice and Class! I teach 3 to 4 days a week (depending on outside contract programs) I train atleast 2 days a week (wish I had more time)
 

jks9199

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Class = instructor teaching material; this may be new or may be review of previously taught material.

Practice = time spent working to increase skill. An instructor may or may not be new material.

Thus... all classes are practices, but not all practices are classes.
 

still learning

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Hello, When we first start learning about martial arts......One of our Sensi mention: " For every hour of class."... "You should practice at home ( 5 )hours"

This was "HIS rule of thumb".....the longer you can train or practice at home...the more advance you will become in your learning.

Many students do not excercise or practice of any kind at home....those who do alot..they will see more improvements in themselves and the trainings.

Common sense here.....learn the correct ways in class, take it home....practice and practice and practice what you learn in class.

Aloha .....home is a place to rest and sleep too!
 

IcemanSK

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I believe the time with one's instructor should be a time of both practice & class. Often, it's necessary for the instructor to instill the ethic of practice in the students. TV & movies show the "great master" who can barely walk jump up and fight 4 guys at once. Students (especially kids) feel that their instructor lives in the dojang/dojo &/or never needs to train. We need to dispell that myth.:mst:
 
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stone_dragone

stone_dragone

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Hello, When we first start learning about martial arts......One of our Sensi mention: " For every hour of class."... "You should practice at home ( 5 )hours"

This was "HIS rule of thumb".....the longer you can train or practice at home...the more advance you will become in your learning.

Many students do not excercise or practice of any kind at home....those who do alot..they will see more improvements in themselves and the trainings.

Common sense here.....learn the correct ways in class, take it home....practice and practice and practice what you learn in class.

Aloha .....home is a place to rest and sleep too!

I admit that I no longer hold myself to this standard, when I was a teenager and had the freedom to practice nonstop at home, I probably was close to the 5:1 ratio.

Good point!
 

newGuy12

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I am a little ashamed to say that I do not practice outside of the school very much. I do pushups and ab exercises (Legendary Abs), and stretches.

I also do hyung in the back yard after it is dark and no one can see me.

I do, however, go early to class and get extra practice before class. When I finally leave the dojang (or any other training facility which I have occasion to go to) I am always fully spent, out of gas, if I have anything to do with it. So, at least I know that when I DO practice, I tend to really put it on, no joking around.

I think its a bit much if I get too much new information at one time. I feel overwhelmed when that happens. Its as if a cup can only hold so much new tea at any one time! It has to soak in a little sometimes!
 

still learning

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I am a little ashamed to say that I do not practice outside of the school very much. I do pushups and ab exercises (Legendary Abs), and stretches.

I also do hyung in the back yard after it is dark and no one can see me.

I do, however, go early to class and get extra practice before class. When I finally leave the dojang (or any other training facility which I have occasion to go to) I am always fully spent, out of gas, if I have anything to do with it. So, at least I know that when I DO practice, I tend to really put it on, no joking around.

I think its a bit much if I get too much new information at one time. I feel overwhelmed when that happens. Its as if a cup can only hold so much new tea at any one time! It has to soak in a little sometimes!

Hello, Just a suggestion here.....When you are home...sitting down watching TV....when a commercial come on....do push-ups or squats... or stretching or do a few things from class....when the commercial is (PAU!)...hawaiian word for finish/done. sit back down....MAKE THIS A HABIT.....you will be surprise what you can acomplish here
Even just 5-10 minutes a day can make a big difference.

Got 5 - 10 minutes at home.....jump rope, one of the best excerise's you can do for your self!

IN the shower...you can do many different excerises too! NEVER say I got NO time at home.....it is easy to do NOTHING.......

Aloha , .....5 minutes a day is 35 minutes in one week, times 52 weeks is over 30 hours a year....and that is just in the shower!
!
 

amishman

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I think its a bit much if I get too much new information at one time. I feel overwhelmed when that happens. Its as if a cup can only hold so much new tea at any one time! It has to soak in a little sometimes!

I just started Kuk Sool Won 2 weeks ago and after 20+ years of not doing any martial arts, I have to agree getting too much too soon is a bit over-bearing. Scares me off a bit like questioning what I got myself into. hehehe.

In the two weeks and two days of joining, I have done the following. Went to 6 classes that are each an hour long and even attended a KSW tournament (as a spectator) that 1st week. So, I feel like I am jumping in with both feet. I plan on attending classes 2, maybe 3 times per week. I don't want to over-do it and burn out. While away from class, I find myself not "really" practicing hard like putting aside a whole hour and practice my Hyung but I periodically 1 little part if the Hyung here and then later do a little more. Over time I will learn it that way I hope. Maybe if time permits later I will practice at home better but for now, my classes are like my practice time for me with little bits here and there while I am away.

tj
 

Drac

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I hold practices they sweat and sometimes bleed so it would not be consider classes. Just my opinion.

I agree with Terry..Class is where you learn, practice is where you put what you have learned to the test...My opinion
 

loyalonehk

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How many people regularly attend a karate/TKD/escrima/other practice?

How many attend a karate/TKD/escrima/other class?

I was just thinking about the difference between classes and practice. To me the term "practice" indicates a sport or more physical training, whereas the term "class" shows a more academic feeling...

Your thoughts?


21yrs and counting... At this point in my journey, I am teaching my 2 group "classes" a week at my school. I attend my teachers school twice a week when possible (1 day I just "practice" and sneek in a bit of assistance where requested and if I make it the 2nd time in a week I teach the class for about 50% of the time).

I practice whenever and where ever possible. My class time comes at random when in the company of my teacher.

I also randomly teach private lessons to some of my students that want private lessons (ie to polish certain things or make up for lost class time due to vacation or deployments)
 

Brother John

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I see 'class' as the place to learn, review and work some buggs out.
I see 'practice' as working hard outside of the regular class-time. It could be with others, but more often than not it's on your own. I'm a big believer in DAILY practice and constant STUDY.

Study is when you not only practice but also ponder or put thought into what you do, how you do it and why you do it. Like Master Funakoshi said:
"Every lesson in life is a lesson in Karate-Do."

Your Brother
John
 

Andrew Green

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I feel that the same goes for martial arts. People should be practicing at home to gain proficiency in new material, so that it can be refined, corrected, and added to during class. Unfortunately, that doesn't happen very often, so martial arts classes end up being more of a practice for most people who are trying to just get better at things that they have learned in the past.


This would only work in a system based around solo work, how do you practice wrestling or Judo at home? Kata yes, sparring no.

Personally the idea of someone going to a "Football class" just sounds a little weird, and in my mind, martial arts is just another sport.
 

Brother John

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This would only work in a system based around solo work, how do you practice wrestling or Judo at home? Kata yes, sparring no.

Personally the idea of someone going to a "Football class" just sounds a little weird, and in my mind, martial arts is just another sport.
I'll have to disagree with you there. At least....on how it's worded.

There are MANY martial arts that aren't "Based" on solo work, yet have skill sets that can be trained and 'practiced' on ones own. For instance, I train in American Kenpo Karate. The BEST training is with another person, definitely....can't beat body to body workouts!!!! But the self defense techniques should be trained/practiced when you are alone as well. The system is definitely not 'based around solo work', but you can practice pretty much everything w/in it's curriculum either with another person or alone.
And Kenpo is not unique in this.

True, there are some arts or elements of arts that would be difficult to train in alone. Though I do know friends in Judo who do train alone. One likes to wrap a belt around a tree in his back yard and practice a simulation of a hip throw by slamming his hip into it repeatedly. Granted...that's just a simulation and little more than an 'exercise' I suppose.....but a Judoka isn't at a complete loss for training experiences when she/he is alone.

Your Brother
John
 

jks9199

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This would only work in a system based around solo work, how do you practice wrestling or Judo at home? Kata yes, sparring no.

Personally the idea of someone going to a "Football class" just sounds a little weird, and in my mind, martial arts is just another sport.
You can "practice" for many activities, like football, wrestling, and boxing, at home and alone. You can do various drills and exercises designed to develop the skills of your sport; you can walk through moves, plays, or combinations without an opponent or bag. You can do conditioning so that every moment of your team or group practice can be used doing things that you can't do at home.
 
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