Checking the Storm...

kenpo3631

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In the mid eighties I learned Checking the Storm with a front chicken kick.

Why was it changed from the original way it was taught (besides creativity from an EP Student...heard that one already:shrug: )?

In the current version, how many people deliver the side kick to the opponent's left leg and why? :asian:
 
I learned it as a left kick to the groin followed by a right knife
edge kick to the inside of the attacker's right knee.
 
By kicking their the attackers leg knee you are cancelling their height and lower their hed for the ensuing backfist. The backfist will be stronger if it strikes parallel to the ground and even stronger if travelling diagoanlly downward than it would if it had to strike up to the attackers head.
 
Originally posted by Kirk

I learned it as a left kick to the groin followed by a right knife
edge kick to the inside of the attacker's right knee.
Is there anyone out there that does not and why?
 
Originally posted by Rob_Broad

By kicking their the attackers leg knee you are cancelling their height and lower their hed for the ensuing backfist. The backfist will be stronger if it strikes parallel to the ground and even stronger if travelling diagoanlly downward than it would if it had to strike up to the attackers head.

By kicking their the attackers leg knee you are cancelling their height and lower their hed for the ensuing backfist.
Okay....WHICH leg do you mean?:asian:
 
I should have stated kicking their left leg with your right side kick. If you were to kick somehow kick the right knee with your right side kick you could accidentally cause their head to snap into you on the way down.
 
Originally posted by Rob_Broad

By kicking their the attackers leg knee you are cancelling their height and lower their hed for the ensuing backfist. The backfist will be stronger if it strikes parallel to the ground and even stronger if travelling diagoanlly downward than it would if it had to strike up to the attackers head.

By kicking their the attackers leg knee you are cancelling their height and lower their hed for the ensuing backfist.

Depending on which leg you are talking about...:rofl: You would also cancel out the opponent's width by cross checking him.

The backfist will be stronger if it strikes parallel to the ground and even stronger if travelling diagoanlly downward than it would if it had to strike up to the attackers head. [/B]

Yes, the backnuckle would be stronger but you forgot a key ingredient if you use it that way...Marriage with Gravity. The opponent's head should "ideally" be right in line for the backnuckle anyway. It is set up with the first kick. Hee hee, that is if he is still standing after the groin shot..... :rofl:
 
Quick question for everyone,
How many people actually swing a club the way the attack is written? I know my shoulder can't take it personally.
Respectfully,
Mace
 
Originally posted by Mace

Quick question for everyone,
How many people actually swing a club the way the attack is written? I know my shoulder can't take it personally.
Respectfully,
Mace

How many people actually swing a club the way the attack is written?

I know it is not polite to answer a question with a question, but how many people actually think the attacker will stop after the over head club????:confused:
 
The way we practice it in our class is after the overhead club the arm bounces back when the stick hits the ground then travels horizontally. Basically overhead club to inward horizontal club attack. Just a thought for everyone.
Jason Farnsworth
 
Originally posted by Rob_Broad

I should have stated kicking their left leg with your right side kick. If you were to kick somehow kick the right knee with your right side kick you could accidentally cause their head to snap into you on the way down.

Sorry about that Rob. I replied a little faster to the previous post than you did.

I have to disagree with you on that point though. By kicking the left leg you can send your opponent into a negative orbit causing possible unintentional harm to yourself. If he falls the line to your groin is wide open...:erg:

Just food for thought...:asian:
 
He can fall to your groin, but not if you close your line by extending the leg and rolling your hip inward. This is going to come down to the semantics fo how big the attacker and the defender are. I am not a tal person so it is easier for me to close my line than it is for a taller person.
 
But if you cross check him your body is already in position to check off the unintentional attack. No need to roll anything.


How do you roll the hip by the way? Just turn the foot inboard?
 
Originally posted by kenpo3631

But if you cross check him your body is already in position to check off the unintentional attack. No need to roll anything.


How do you roll the hip by the way? Just turn the foot inboard?

And if you retain the attacking arm at the hand as it is still holding the club you can control the attacker as he drops, again it comes down to your personal kenpo, the techniques must be tailored to fit the individual. Since I am a smaller guy Iwould rather keep a little distance between the attacker and me until the final strike.
 
Originally posted by Rob_Broad



And if you retain the attacking arm at the hand as it is still holding the club you can control the attacker as he drops, again it comes down to your personal kenpo, the techniques must be tailored to fit the individual. Since I am a smaller guy Iwould rather keep a little distance between the attacker and me until the final strike.


And if you retain the attacking arm at the hand as it is still holding the club you can control the attacker as he drops

I was hoping that both of his hands would grab for his groin after the first kick. Besides won't he be bent over in the first place if you kick him in the groin. If so you won't have a hand to hold on to and the club should be out the picture....."ideally"
 
Hey Lance,
When I originally learned the tech, it was an overhead attack that continued into an inward attack. So to answer your question, I don't think that the attacker would stop after the first swing. To answer my question, I also don't think any attacker would come straight overhead with the first strike. Put a stick (foam hopefully :p ) into a white belts hand and ask them to take a shot at your head. I'm willing to bet it'll be on a 45.
Respectfully,
Mace (who's gonna jam em and not wait for the big piece of wood to find me stepping away)
 
Kenpo 3631 brought up a good point when he said ideally. Remember that when we are teaching a new student Checking the Storm, we are teaching in the ideal phase. The more advanced student would start kicking around the what if stage as we are predominantly doing here. Then as they progress, the move onto the formulation phase, which is a lot of what we seem to be doing here.
Just to use an example of how I teach the technique:
Step out to 1:30 with the right foot while parrying with the right hand. Slide into a 45 Degree Cat as you execute a left EOB. Execute a left fron kick to the groin and follow with a right knife edge kick to the groin.
Now depending on the distance and the elvel of the practioner involved after the left front kick is delivered, i may have them change the weapon to a right twist kick. In both instances,if they are close enough to the attacker, I have them follow up with a downward/diagonal back fist to the temple/or mastoid.
 
Hi Seig,
That's about how I have the tech for the ideal phase, too. But I've found pretty much anything after the ideal, and you are getting whacked with a stick, whether to the left shin/thigh, left OEB, or right side of the head. Just what I've found when picking up the pace of the club for realism.
Respectfully,
Mace
 
Checking the Storm

1. Step with your right foot to 3 o'clock into a left cat stance. Your left hand is covering high and your right hand is covering your solar plexus.

2. Execute a left front snap kick to your attacker's groin.

3. Plant your left foot into a left front twist stance with a right side snap kick to attacker's right knee.

4. Land forward into a right neutral bow with a right outward back-knuckle to attacker's temple.

This is the Ideal phase. I was also taught one time to do it with a chicken kick, one to the left knee cap and the other to the groin.

So my question now would be, what would you do with it coming in at a 45, or horizontally? Evading the Storm or Calming the Storm?


:asian:
 
Hey Klondike,
I'd probably go with calming the storm to get to the inside of the attack and just guard and tuck the head more. I wouldn't recommend evading if you were taught to step up to 10:30, you'll be stepping right into the orbit of most people's swing. If you were taught to go back on a 45, its slightly better but should be executed quickly. That's my thought, anyway.
Respectfully,
Mace
 

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